LumberJocks

phase converter for 3 phase 5-HP Delta table saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by lazyborn1 posted 09-27-2009 03:03 PM 16490 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View lazyborn1's profile

lazyborn1

20 posts in 2710 days


09-27-2009 03:03 PM

Has anyone here used a phase converter?

I have a 3-phase, 5-hp delta 10” table saw. I am thinking of buying a phase converter so that I can run the table saw in my home workshop (single phase). I hope someone can give me some advise on this topic, including the set-up and type of converter (brand name).

—Thanks


37 replies so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3562 days


#1 posted 09-27-2009 03:14 PM

I don’t use phase converters but I have friends that do. The most recommended is a rotary phase converter. It runs off of single phase and generates the third leg of electricity to create three phase.

They work well but get an electrician for the hook-up.

An electrician will also be able to give you some good advice on getting one.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Moron's profile

Moron

5032 posts in 3355 days


#2 posted 09-27-2009 03:24 PM

I have a rotary phase converter that can handle up to 15 HP, meaning I can run up to 3 tools at a time. I think you also need a transformer too, as the voltage on 3 phase is generally 550/560.

I spent around 6K for both units plus labour. I had a master electrician hook mine up.

It would be less $$$$ to change over the motor and switch!

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3863 days


#3 posted 09-27-2009 03:54 PM

I own 2 phase converters, but only use one. it’s a 5 – 7.5 HP version. It’s an electronic version that kicks in the Third phase to start the motor (tablesaw.) and then drops off.

The saw then continues to run on 2 phase current, (220 Volts, really single phase on 2 wires). I’ve run this setup for about 25 years. So essentially you only get 2/3 of the rated HP of the motor.

It was first hooked up to planer that has a 5hp motor. I bought a new looking motor for $5.00 and figured that would be a lot cheaper that a new 5 hp motor.

I bought mine on eBay for $70.00 – $120.00. I don’t remember the price.

I’m happy with the way it works. I burnt an earlier one out when the cord was laying in some wet sawdust and when I turned the saw on the power shorted out.

I hooked everything up myself. To reverse the motor you change any two of the three wires. So if your saw runs backward, you just reverse two of the leads.

On my magnetic switch on the saw the two hot wires are going through the coil contacts and the M line (manufactured power) goes through the switch.

I’ve been looking at making a rotary converter but haven’t been able to pick up 10 HP 3 phase motor to make one. I had my eyes on one but the junk yard scrapped it before I grabbed it.

Chuck Bender a LJ’er uses a rotary version in his shop.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3863 days


#4 posted 09-27-2009 04:03 PM

My saw is 220 volts so I don’t use a transformer like Romas states.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3450 days


#5 posted 09-27-2009 04:18 PM

I use a Phase-A-Matic on my 2HP vertical mill. I have used it for going on 12 years now with no problem.

Here’s the model for a 5HP one for $325:

http://www.drillspot.com/products/42118/Phase-A-Matic_PAM-900HD_Static_Phase_Converter

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3562 days


#6 posted 09-27-2009 04:50 PM

I did not get to finish my thought earlier because I got called off to breakfast.

Anyway, an electrician would be able to give you advice specific to your needs. The other guys are right in that you will only need a certain size for running just your tablesaw. But there are other things to consider such as hooking it up. As a remodeling contractor I suggest an electrician.

But another option may be to just replace the motor with a single phase. It will probably be less expensive.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3199 days


#7 posted 09-27-2009 04:59 PM

I use a Kay Industries rotary phase converter. You should make sure you balance the voltages on the three legs so they are very close to each other. Voltages vary across the country and can affect the motor’s performance. I used a buck/boost transformer in conjunction with the phase converter to get my voltages within 1 volt of each other. Some electronic controlled switches are quite sensitive to voltage fluctuations between the three legs.
Kay Industries rates their converters differently than most other manufacturers in that they rate their converters for the maximum size motor theat can be started at a time. For example a 7.5 HP converter is rated to start one motor at a time up to 7.5 HP. Once started the converter can then start another one. One can run up to about 18 to 21 HP at a time by starting the motors up one at a time. Other companies rate their converters at the maximum Hp allowed on the converter. Also, the general rule of thumb is that the heavier the converter the better the performance. Stay away from light weight converters. Mine weighs about 260 lbs.
Here is a link to Kay : http://kayind.com/tech_center/sizing_tables.html

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View lazyborn1's profile

lazyborn1

20 posts in 2710 days


#8 posted 09-27-2009 05:01 PM

thanks for the inputs. I will probably buy a 3-hp, single phase motor. But I hate to throw away my 5hp motor which came with the saw.

View MarkwithaK's profile

MarkwithaK

370 posts in 2640 days


#9 posted 09-27-2009 05:20 PM

Using 3-phase in a residential setting always makes me nervous. All it takes is that one leg dropping out for any reason and single phase the motor which can fry it in a heartbeat. Most recently I had a 3-phase refrigeration compressor lose the one leg all because the 3rd pole of the breaker failed….very expensive repair.

-- If at first you don't succeed then maybe skydiving isn't for you.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17664 posts in 3138 days


#10 posted 09-28-2009 02:49 AM

I have installed a few of them in the last 40 yrs. Changing the motor to single phase is what I wouild recommend unless you need 3 phase for equipment that can’t be retrofited.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3863 days


#11 posted 09-28-2009 03:58 PM

Rick You are absolutly correct. It’s a phase converter and it even looks like the one in the Enco catalog.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1610 posts in 2924 days


#12 posted 09-28-2009 04:29 PM

As Rick has suggested I would go with a VFD. The one you need is here
I have a 2hp VFD powering my ‘68 unisaw and I must say I love it. The installation was very easy and straight forward. Its as close to plug and play as you can get. I would most definately stay away from a static converter. They are hard on motors. If you decide to go with a rotary converter send me a PM and I can send you more info.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17664 posts in 3138 days


#13 posted 09-28-2009 06:45 PM

One of the issues with modern VFDs is the requirement for VFD rated motors. Depending the cycles they are running at, they can blow out the insulation on older motors. You always run the risk of putting a lot of noise on the line that interferes with all kinds of electronic equipment. All of out modern electronic equipment; computers, electronic balllasts and VFDs raise problems with efficiency known as power factor. That is having the current our of sync with the voltage.

Everyone always says to get an electrician to wire it. I have been for 40 yrs+. My first choice would be to change the motor to 240 v single phase if it is an option as in this case and other 3 phase considerations are not a requirement. Especially in a residential enviornment.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View lazyborn1's profile

lazyborn1

20 posts in 2710 days


#14 posted 09-28-2009 07:09 PM

what is the difference between VFD and a static converter? I see that I can buy a rotary converter about $500. I must say that woodworking is my weekend hobby. I do not really require a 5-hp saw. I got it from the IRS auction, and realized that it was a 3-phase saw.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17664 posts in 3138 days


#15 posted 09-28-2009 07:14 PM

The static phase converter makes 3 phase power to run the motor at a set voltage. VFD, variable frequency drive will run the motor at a varying speed, voltage and frequency. One of the advantages of a VFD would be soft starting the motor with out the dramatic inrush current you see dimming the lights a bit. I wouldn’t do it for that alone on a table saw starting without a load.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

showing 1 through 15 of 37 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com