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Forum topic by kenthemadcarpenter posted 06-24-2015 04:53 PM 1034 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kenthemadcarpenter

122 posts in 529 days


06-24-2015 04:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig tip pine tablesaw router drill press

In today’s woodworking world there always things we need in our wood shop to make the job easier. Of course having an extra hand would be nice, but every wood shop needs besides the tools are jigs. There are plenty of jigs on the market you can buy and some them for the few extra bucks it would cost you to buy versus building can be well worth the investment. For the most part how ever i will say before starting any projects besides familiarizing yourself with your tools. start by researching the project you plan on building and any jigs you might need to make them. Most jigs can be made out of scrap lumber. but if you are just getting started you probably don’t have any scrap. typically what i suggest is to buy trim boards and make your jigs out of that. typically i like to make my jigs out of popular. If you need a more durable jig you can buy MDF sheets and cut it down.


16 replies so far

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 638 days


#1 posted 06-24-2015 05:36 PM

Jigs can be made or bought.

Sometimes there is pleasure in making a jig but other times spending hours to make your own dovetail jig distracts from woodworking and it is better to simply go out and buy one. Since I am working towards selling enough woodworking to pay for the tools and stuff for me. I can’t spend hours or days making a jig I need that time to make product.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View sawdust703's profile

sawdust703

270 posts in 881 days


#2 posted 06-25-2015 12:23 AM

Jigs aren’t all there is to woodworking. Make no mistake, its an excellent way to learn to square, size, & fit your needs, but to be a beginner in woodworking is an exciting experience! You are looking & learning at all the projects you want to build, the tools on your wish list, the fancy shop in your dreams, etc. The little things are what’s forgotten. Learning the different species of wood available to you, their workability, and storage. Finishes, & how to use them. Sanding, saw blades, router bits, things of this nature. Learning to use your tools properly, shop safety, personal safety. Read & learn all you can. That’s the biggest secret. The second, learn to put it all to use to your benefit. Enjoy your venture.

-- Sawdust703

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2692 days


#3 posted 06-25-2015 02:41 AM

I think you need a jig that will help you with your writing, grammar, spelling and punctuation. :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23142 posts in 2328 days


#4 posted 06-25-2015 03:00 PM

I often buy jigs because I am always short of time. Whenever I build a jig or a piece of shop furniture I am always content for it to be accurate and/or functional. In other words, I never have the time to make it also look beautiful. This may be a fault of mine but time and material is usually the determining factor. My main goal right now is to turn my shop into a business in order to supplement my retirement income. I need to have a going business before my wife retires from her job. I have found that starting my business is taking more work and time than I had anticipated.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View kenthemadcarpenter's profile

kenthemadcarpenter

122 posts in 529 days


#5 posted 06-30-2015 05:00 PM



Jigs aren’t all there is to woodworking,In my workshop they are vital, I have three jigs I use religiously, My frame jig, my table saw jig for making cove’s and my dedicated 3/4” dado jig. Jigs are not just about squaring or sizing, there many different applications as to when and where a jig can and should be used. By building your own jigs, you have greater control and can customize them to fit your own particular needs. As an example I could have gone out and bought an adjustable dado jig, how ever I know I have 6 book shelves I am building each of them 22” wide. It was simpler and in the long run smarter to build a dedicated jig. While jigs aren’t the only aspect of woodworking they can play a vital role in building your projects, while some jigs may only serve as a single use others will become a mainstay in your workshop

Jigs aren t all there is to woodworking. Make no mistake, its an excellent way to learn to square, size, & fit your needs, but to be a beginner in woodworking is an exciting experience! You are looking & learning at all the projects you want to build, the tools on your wish list, the fancy shop in your dreams, etc. The little things are what s forgotten. Learning the different species of wood available to you, their workability, and storage. Finishes, & how to use them. Sanding, saw blades, router bits, things of this nature. Learning to use your tools properly, shop safety, personal safety. Read & learn all you can. That s the biggest secret. The second, learn to put it all to use to your benefit. Enjoy your venture.

- sawdust703


View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1965 days


#6 posted 06-30-2015 05:22 PM



I think you need a jig that will help you with your writing, grammar, spelling and punctuation. :-)

- MT_Stringer

I agree. How can you be expected to be taken seriously if you can’t write?

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#7 posted 06-30-2015 05:46 PM


typically i like to make my jigs out of popular.

- kenthemadcarpenter

I like it when my jigs have lots of friends, too.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View sawdust703's profile

sawdust703

270 posts in 881 days


#8 posted 07-01-2015 04:28 AM

I have to say, two of the most idiotic things that never end on this forum are smart ass wanna be experts, & them that just can’t shut their mouths about other folks way of typing & spelling. I hope the whole damn world never gets the “I’m better than all of you” attitude, because if folks get to picking at other folks like you know it all no accounts do, we just as well kiss our asses good bye!!!!

-- Sawdust703

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1965 days


#9 posted 07-01-2015 04:33 AM



I have to say, two of the most idiotic things that never end on this forum are smart ass wanna be experts, & them that just can t shut their mouths about other folks way of typing & spelling. I hope the whole damn world never gets the “I m better than all of you” attitude, because if folks get to picking at other folks like you know it all no accounts do, we just as well kiss our asses good bye!!!!

- sawdust703

Well said sawdust703. My kind of guy. Now, about that above paragraph…

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View jhon09's profile

jhon09

1 post in 526 days


#10 posted 07-01-2015 08:54 AM

I dabble in woodworking, primarily in the winter when there is less daylight, but I got started by building a small treasure-like chest with dovetail joints. chinese commercial plywood is good i found that. I also added the additional challange to myself of not using any power tools. It was a challenge and I made a number of mistakes but I learned a lot. Just jumping in is the best way to learn in my opinion. Pick something you would like to make and go for it!
Most importantly, have fun.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#11 posted 07-01-2015 02:07 PM

Jigs…...

Once you realize you need one you have to stop the project to build it

Once you build it, you have to put it somewhere.

Once you found a place to put it you have to remember where you put it.

Once you drag it out, as soon as you put it away, you will need it again.

BTW, I don’t build them out of MDF anymore I hate that stuff.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 982 days


#12 posted 07-01-2015 02:19 PM


Jigs…...

Once you realize you need one you have to stop the project to build it

Once you build it, you have to put it somewhere.

Once you found a place to put it you have to remember where you put it.

Once you drag it out, as soon as you put it away, you will need it again.

BTW, I don t build them out of MDF anymore I hate that stuff.

- rwe2156

Also, the next time you drag it out you will have forgotten how to use it. (Always write identification and instructions on the jig.)


Most importantly, have fun.

- jhon09

That is the most important part. That’s why we do woodworking, right ?

View kenthemadcarpenter's profile

kenthemadcarpenter

122 posts in 529 days


#13 posted 07-02-2015 12:39 PM


typically i like to make my jigs out of popular.

- kenthemadcarpenter

I like it when my jigs have lots of friends, too.

- BinghamtonEd


Common Name(s): Poplar, Tulip Poplar, Yellow Poplar
Scientific Name: Liriodendron tulipifera
Distribution: Eastern United States
Tree Size: 130-160 ft (40-50 m) tall, 6-8 ft (1.8-2.5 m) trunk diameter
Average Dried Weight: 29 lbs/ft3 (455 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .40, .46
Janka Hardness: 540 lbf (2,400 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 10,100 lbf/in2 (69.7 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,580,000 lbf/in2 (10.90 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 5,540 lbf/in2 (38.2 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 4.6%, Tangential: 8.2%, Volumetric: 12.7%, T/R Ratio: 1.8

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#14 posted 07-02-2015 01:25 PM

typically i like to make my jigs out of popular.

- kenthemadcarpenter

I like it when my jigs have lots of friends, too.

- BinghamtonEd

Common Name(s): Poplar, Tulip Poplar, Yellow Poplar
Scientific Name: Liriodendron tulipifera
Distribution: Eastern United States
Tree Size: 130-160 ft (40-50 m) tall, 6-8 ft (1.8-2.5 m) trunk diameter
Average Dried Weight: 29 lbs/ft3 (455 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .40, .46
Janka Hardness: 540 lbf (2,400 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 10,100 lbf/in2 (69.7 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,580,000 lbf/in2 (10.90 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 5,540 lbf/in2 (38.2 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 4.6%, Tangential: 8.2%, Volumetric: 12.7%, T/R Ratio: 1.8

- kenthemadcarpenter

I’m familiar with poplar. I was just poking fun because I think you were a victim of auto-correct. Your jigs are very popular. I think a couple people got too wound around the axle about it, lighten up, guys.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1965 days


#15 posted 07-02-2015 04:00 PM

I m familiar with poplar. I was just poking fun because I think you were a victim of auto-correct. Your jigs are very popular. I think a couple people got too wound around the axle about it, lighten up, guys.

- BinghamtonEd

Your poplar jigs are popular. Or, your popular jigs are poplar.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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