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Crown Molding for Built-In

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Forum topic by Kenkussions posted 06-23-2015 08:17 PM 822 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kenkussions

8 posts in 532 days


06-23-2015 08:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: crown ceiling slope molding

Hello,

I am new to the forum and am having a problem with a built-in I am working on. I have searched the web, forums and watched youtube videos but cannot figure out my issue. This is my first time ever working with crown molding so maybe this is something fairly routine. Anyway, onto the issue, the way I have constructed the built-in is to be flush with the sloped ceiling and the part I am having trouble with is the outside corner where I am trying to join a piece to the sloped ceiling. I cannot get the piece of crown to line up properly. I have attached pictures as that does a better job of explaining what I am talking about. Any help/ insight would be greatly appreciated. Notes: The crown I am working with has a 45 degree spring angle the angle between the ceiling and the slope is approx. 148 degrees which I believe would mean the cut I would make is approx 29 degrees (148-90/2). I am using a compound miter saw to make my cuts as well.

Thanks for any help,

Ken


13 replies so far

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 596 days


#1 posted 06-23-2015 08:34 PM

I could be wrong, but that doesn’t look like a 45 deg spring angle.
Try cutting the crown on the saw tilted at the angle it will be when it’s on the wall, not flat, set your miter to 16 degrees. Cut the same angle for both pcs.

-- -

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3674 posts in 1728 days


#2 posted 06-24-2015 12:01 AM

That is one tough looking corner. My hats off to you if you can make that work. Wish I had an easy answer for you. Good luck.

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Kenkussions

8 posts in 532 days


#3 posted 06-24-2015 01:32 AM

Woodust! You saved me a lot of frustration! I appreciate the help and insight. Makes total sense after reading your reply. I’ve got it to the “good enough” stage as I will be caulking and painting (and this is going in my first child’s nursery and time is of the essence) :). Thanks again for helping me out as this is my first large project and I am just beginning my woodworking journey.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#4 posted 06-24-2015 02:16 AM

Good for you

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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runswithscissors

2187 posts in 1488 days


#5 posted 06-24-2015 03:25 AM

Caulking and putty are the woodworker’s saviors.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 596 days


#6 posted 06-24-2015 04:26 AM

Glad I could help.

I always say…Putty and Paint, is what I aint :)

-- -

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3205 days


#7 posted 06-24-2015 04:48 AM

A lot of times you can “tighten” the gap by using a block plane and shaving/back beveling the faces of the pieces so that the outside face of the joint comes together tighter.

I had to do that to fine tune the segments as I wrapped a hexagon aquarium base with crown molding at the bottom, and just casing at the top. Few swipes on that inside corner with a block plane closed up the gaps, then I pin nailed it at the joint.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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Kenkussions

8 posts in 532 days


#8 posted 06-24-2015 12:46 PM

I like your saying woodust. DrDirt, that is a great tip!

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 694 days


#9 posted 06-24-2015 12:57 PM

I remember my first time doing crown. We had just installed the cabinets and it was time to do the crown. I had a theoretical understanding of it but had never done it. I though my boss was going to give me the 101. Well, he did. We got the compressor, guns and saw off the truck and he said he would be back later. I told him i hadnt done crown yet.

“Upside down and backwards, have fun.”

It was a 101 in crown. I did it well. I was quite scared as it was stained oak. The saving grace was that it was on cabinets rather than walls.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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Kenkussions

8 posts in 532 days


#10 posted 07-27-2015 06:22 PM

Thanks again to everyone for their helpful comments. I have finally finished this project (took 2 months as I only had a few hours here and there to work on it). I figured I would follow up with the finished product. Again I appreciate the insight that was lent.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1890 days


#11 posted 07-27-2015 11:52 PM

Looks good enough to post as a real project! Might even get a daily top three… Well done from me.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3674 posts in 1728 days


#12 posted 07-28-2015 12:20 AM

Got to agree that looks really nice. When I saw you first question I was stumped too. I’ve done a good amount of crown molding and never came across a problem like yours. Suffice it to say, ’ you really nailed it.’ I meant to say that.

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Kenkussions

8 posts in 532 days


#13 posted 07-28-2015 02:48 AM

Thanks for the kind words. I might post it under projects in the coming days with some photos of the various stages of the build.

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