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What/How are you guys cutting ipe?

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Forum topic by CB_Cohick posted 06-22-2015 04:24 PM 2001 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 710 days


06-22-2015 04:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question ipe milling cutting

I have some 2×6 ipe cutoffs I am trying to find some uses for. Just messing around, I was squaring up the edges of my cutoffs to get a feel for the material. Holy smokes is this stuff hard! My saw blade was getting close to needing sharpening before. It is dead dull now. How do you folks cut your ipe? What tools do you use? What tools and/or accessories do you not use?

Thanks,

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.


14 replies so far

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1431 posts in 2222 days


#1 posted 06-22-2015 04:42 PM

Send all you have to me – I’ll figure something out!

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7902 posts in 1839 days


#2 posted 06-22-2015 04:53 PM

Don’t bother with anything but carbide. Carbon steel blades will cut it but you’ll have to sharpen them after. I ruined a brand new bandsaw blade playing around with this stuff. Ipe will reset your definition of ‘hard’.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#3 posted 06-23-2015 12:45 AM

I have cut, resawed, and routed a fair amount of Ipe using: Freud Diablo 24 tooth blade on the TS, Timberwolf blades on the BS (non carbide), and Whiteside router bits. It seemed to play well with all these cutters. I am pretty anal about keeping all my cutters CLEAN and sharp.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 901 days


#4 posted 06-23-2015 01:05 AM

Ipe is just nasty. Hard, resinous, and with a high silica content (like cutting through sand)—- it dulls blades. Just have to face it.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#5 posted 06-23-2015 02:08 AM

http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/ipe/

Workability: Overall, Ipe is a difficult wood to work, being extremely hard and dense, with high cutting resistance during sawing. Ipe also has a pronounced blunting effect on cutting edges. The wood generally planes smoothly, but the grain can tearout on interlocked areas. Also, Ipe can be difficult to glue properly, and surface preparation prior to gluing is recommended. Straight-grained wood turns well, though the natural powdery yellow deposits can sometimes interfere with polishing or finishing the wood.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7902 posts in 1839 days


#6 posted 06-23-2015 05:32 AM

It does turn well, with carbide tools. You can cut it with steel but you’ll be sharpening every couple minutes. The good thing is that even carbide produces a nice surface since the wood is so hard and doesn’t tear easily.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Stewbot's profile

Stewbot

195 posts in 543 days


#7 posted 06-23-2015 06:53 AM

We did a handful of large Ipe decks in San Fransisco and San Diego and probably used 1-3 blades, (Freud Diablo blades and Freud router bits) per job, depending on the amount of details. The decks turned out great ( and must have cost the client a fortune….stainless steel screws at about $100/5Lbs ) but thinking back on them brings back aggravating memories of trying to manipulate that stuff into parallel spacing, and don’t even get me started on that feeling of snapping screws in the stuff.

Have you worked with tiger wood? (I don’t know if there is a more legitimate term for it, but I’ve only heard it called tiger wood) It seems to have many similiar qualities as Ipe, but with very elaborate colors, predominately orange with black accents. anyway it’s seems a bit easier on the blades and bits etc. and looks great.

-- Hoopty scoop?

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

460 posts in 710 days


#8 posted 06-23-2015 02:02 PM



I have cut, resawed, and routed a fair amount of Ipe using: Freud Diablo 24 tooth blade on the TS, Timberwolf blades on the BS (non carbide), and Whiteside router bits. It seemed to play well with all these cutters. I am pretty anal about keeping all my cutters CLEAN and sharp.

- gfadvm

I noticed your mention of a 24 tooth blade on your TS. Thinking about it, it seems logical that the 24 tooth count might be advantageous for very dense wood. Something more like a rip blade than say a crosscut blade.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View abie's profile

abie

818 posts in 3230 days


#9 posted 06-23-2015 04:25 PM

Hard Hard and nasty on your lungs you cannot glue this stuff
use only screws or Epoxy..

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#10 posted 06-23-2015 07:11 PM

Chris, That’s my thinking. And I use a 2-3 TPI on the bandsaw to resaw.

I’ve read about the gluing problems, but Titebond 2 has worked for me and no acetone wipe before gluing.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7902 posts in 1839 days


#11 posted 06-23-2015 07:40 PM

I haven’t had any problems using wood glue but the stuff I have has been around a few years.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1116 posts in 2585 days


#12 posted 06-25-2015 07:25 PM

I use Ipe all the time… table sleds… candle sticks… a bathroom vanity…. I love the stuff. It carves really well and I have no problem with glue ups. There are about 20 species from both the Tabebuia and Handroanthus genus…. so the color, and workability has a small variety, but they all suit the same purposes for us. I use a Freud Diablo 44t for cutting it. Not so bad if you don’t let the resin gum build on the blades and take shallow cuts. It is the friction heat that starts to take the cutting edge down so fast. But yeah, compared to walnut.. it dulls edges really fast. I have used 2 part epoxy, hide glue, and tight bond 3…. epoxy kinda works better if you use alcohol first and the hide glue with a bit of water. I love it because it is so stable and it smells great… but yes the dust is bad for you… really bad for you.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 901 days


#13 posted 06-26-2015 02:56 AM


... and it smells great… – EPJartisan

It’s in the nose of the beholder, I guess!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3663 posts in 1180 days


#14 posted 06-26-2015 03:10 AM

High yield det cord.

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