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Forum topic by AandCstyle posted 06-20-2015 11:53 PM 1538 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1723 days


06-20-2015 11:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lighting question

Hi, I recently moved into a house that has a mostly unfinished basement which I will convert into a shop. I think I have most of my requirements figured out except for lighting. I have searched and read a lot and think that I will be best served by using T8s with 5000K tubes. The space has an 8’ ceiling and measures about 19’ by 27’. My thought is to install 6 4’ double tube fixtures that will be in 3 rows of two with the outside rows 3’ from the long side walls and 6’ from each of the short walls. I will paint the walls a very light tan color to match the saw dust. :D

My questions are: Will the proposed layout provide adequate lumens for aged eyes? I think I read that 100-150 lumens at the 3’ work surface would be best. Is this reasonable/realistic? Should I go to a lighting store to have them determine what I need or can I get it from the borg? Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

-- Art


23 replies so far

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1918 posts in 1781 days


#1 posted 06-21-2015 12:14 AM

Hi Art,
When I built my shop last year I was going to use the T8 fixtures and the electrician that did the hot hookup for me said that they were fazing out the T8’s (the 1 inch tubes) and going to a T-4 tube.
After some research, I found that the smaller OD tubes still run at 5000K and use less power to provide the same amount of light.
They work well for me.
The down side is that they are a bit more spendy right now with the prices falling, ... and a bit less power consumption? I’m all for that.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4535 posts in 1978 days


#2 posted 06-21-2015 12:24 AM

Art, I just replaced all of my Fluorescent lightning with LED lighting they come in different varieties you can buy them to fit your existing light boxes or you can install new light boxes they kind that clamp to Sheetrock are fine no need for studs, they are recessed lightning so there’s nothing hanging from the ceiling, you get the 670 or higher brightness warm lighting you’ll really like it, if you want to see what the look like you can look through my shop addition blog and you can get an idea.

LED lighting uses half the electricity that fluorescent lighting do and they last years longer

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Grumpymike

1918 posts in 1781 days


#3 posted 06-21-2015 12:33 AM

Good point Randy, When I did my shop the T-4’s were $48.00 a piece and the LED’s were well over $100.00.

I may replace mine some day but not this year.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4535 posts in 1978 days


#4 posted 06-21-2015 12:35 AM

LEDs have come way down now, you’re looking at between $35.00 – $40.00 a pop now.

These are what I have in my shop, these are for cans.
http://t.homedepot.com/p/Commercial-Electric-5-in-and-6-in-2700K-White-LED-Recessed-Trim-with-90-CRI-CER6730AWH27/204726945/

These are for existing or for new light boxes
http://t.homedepot.com/p/Halo-5-in-and-6-in-Matte-White-Recessed-LED-Surface-Disk-Light-80-CRI-3000K-SLD606830WHR/204732243?keyword=Sld606830whr

Both of these are what I am using just make sure they are 670 or 675 brightness.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Vest's profile

Vest

53 posts in 1089 days


#5 posted 06-21-2015 12:40 AM

Art something for you to check on. Google search Big Ass Garage lights. They are the best you can get . 1 of these will put out more light than 4 of the regular shop lights, they last longer, and are cheaper to have on. They are kinda high but well worth the money.

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Grumpymike

1918 posts in 1781 days


#6 posted 06-21-2015 12:42 AM

Is that per tube ? or with the fixture and two tubes … mine are the four tube fixtures … lights me up pretty well.

I will go shopping this week and see what the prices are at BORG

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Vest's profile

Vest

53 posts in 1089 days


#7 posted 06-21-2015 12:46 AM

With the fixture and 2 bulbs. I had the old type that had 3 bulbs. Got 1 of these. Amazing. No comparison .

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Heywood

35 posts in 914 days


#8 posted 06-21-2015 01:13 AM

I will 2nd what vest has suggested. You might as well spend a few dollars more initially and pretty much be done forever. The LED is much easier on the eyes, nothing is as bright. I doubt you would ever replace a bulb. Much cheaper to run and no heat. Plus the fixture is really awesome.

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Vest

53 posts in 1089 days


#9 posted 06-21-2015 01:20 AM

I plan on getting 3 more over the next couple years. Just can’t do it all at once.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#10 posted 06-21-2015 03:37 AM

Just some food for thought. It is not only the intensity of the light source, but also the color temperature, usually given in Kelvin. Now a lot of the reported color temperatures are pretty optimistic but they do give a decent indication of what kind of light they will put out. The lower the kelvin, the yellower the light is. The higher, the more white\blue spectrum becomes prevalent. It is something you really need to sort out for yourself because it can be really important when doing stain work, painting or anything color related.

So, yes, lumens is important but it should not the only consideration for some of us. Personally, I like the higher color temperatures for their whiter light.

P.S. LOTS of number games played in this area of lamp kelvin temperatures so take them with a grain of salt. One mfgs 10,000K is nothing like anothers so don’t buy just on numbers. This is one of those things you may want to go see in person at a good light store to see what you are getting and compare.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#11 posted 06-21-2015 03:55 AM

I’d go with 4000k. 5000k will have bright blue light. 4000k is as close to daylight as it gets. T8s aren’t getting phased out, t12s are. T5s are nice but I wouldn’t put them in a shop with a ceiling lower than 9’.

Edit: sorry, I wouldn’t use T5ho. Regular T5s might be fine but I’ve never used them but have put up a hundred plus T5HO high bays and strips. The high bays are awesome. If you have a ceiling tall enough for HID highbays (HPS, Mercury vapor or metal halide) then converting to a T5 fixture will pay for itself.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Blackie_

4535 posts in 1978 days


#12 posted 06-21-2015 11:47 AM

After reading the others comments it was sorta of a lesson learned for me and after more research sounds like the 4000 – 5000K T-8’s or T-5s are the way to go, I understand that the LED’s run cooler, my shop has 8’ ceilings, I don’t remember which Fluorescent bulbs I was running in my fixtures and they did provide quite a bit of light but I had them all over the place hanging from the 8’ ceiling they made the shop look very cluttered, they were dust collectors, plus they lowered my ceiling, I found that the universal LED kits that retro fit into the existing boxes were higher powered and produced 670 at 3000K which in my case were actually brighter then the Fluorescent’s plus I have a much higher ceiling now without all the clutter and ugliness, four of the LEDS are 650s at 2700K which are new construction can trim kits the rest are the universal kits, I have a total of 13 lights and I’ve lost no quality in lighting and have gained in some areas and my shop looks much more attractive with the recessed lighting, it was a win – win for me and I doubt I’ll ever have to replace them in my life time and the energy cost will be a savings.

Here are the before and after pictures in my blog.

Before

After

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Mark's profile

Mark

820 posts in 1440 days


#13 posted 06-21-2015 02:41 PM

Morning Art. I did a quick sketch of your basement. If I drew it right ,You will have 6’ between each fixture a, 6’ from each end wall and 3’ from each side wall??? The 2 end walls I would see as concern. With a basement having no out side light, relying strictly on overhead lighting you may have shadows,dark areas. Especially if your bench is against one of the short end walls.
My garage is 11×26. I have a total of 6 4’,2 tube fit. +2 windows. Not bad during the day, but just adequate at night. Can you provide a separate clean circuit just for lighting. Up here we can load a circuit to 80% of its capacity.
15A circuit @80% = 12 amps. How many fixtures can you put on a 12 A circuit. My walls and ceiling are flat white. The dust doesn’t show to bad. :) All things said and done, at the very least I would add 1 more on each end sorta centre by centre.
If you look in the SHOPS tab on the web site you might get some ideas. Hope it all works out .
Cheers.

-- Mark

View DIYaholic's profile (online now)

DIYaholic

19180 posts in 2141 days


#14 posted 06-21-2015 04:21 PM

I just installed 5 revamped fixtures and revamped another 4 fixtures, in my 13’ x 19’ shop.
It is a simple “rewiring”, to remove/bypass the ballast, to use LED tube lights.
I also have replaced all CFL/incandescent bulbs with LEDs.

LED Tube Lights:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FILEG2E?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

LED Bulbs:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00J9OP1NY?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00

The Home Depot has a less expensive A19 Bulb, made by Cree.
Cree is made in the good old US of A….
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Cree-75W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-A19-Dimmable-LED-Light-Bulb-BA19-11050OMF-12DE26-1U100/204730892

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2575 days


#15 posted 06-21-2015 05:26 PM



Just some food for thought. It is not only the intensity of the light source, but also the color temperature, usually given in Kelvin. Now a lot of the reported color temperatures are pretty optimistic but they do give a decent indication of what kind of light they will put out. The lower the kelvin, the yellower the light is. The higher, the more whitelue spectrum becomes prevalent. It is something you really need to sort out for yourself because it can be really important when doing stain work, painting or anything color related.

So, yes, lumens is important but it should not the only consideration for some of us. Personally, I like the higher color temperatures for their whiter light.

P.S. LOTS of number games played in this area of lamp kelvin temperatures so take them with a grain of salt. One mfgs 10,000K is nothing like anothers so don t buy just on numbers. This is one of those things you may want to go see in person at a good light store to see what you are getting and compare.

- timbertailor

Yes! If you stain under the color in the shop, it may look strange when illuminated in its final place. If you think that the end user has different lighting, it would be good to take a sample in that lighting for your use in the shop when staining or painting.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

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