LumberJocks

hand plane refurb - to pitted to fix?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by smboudreaux posted 06-18-2015 11:13 PM 982 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View smboudreaux's profile

smboudreaux

51 posts in 2172 days


06-18-2015 11:13 PM

I recently jumped on the hand plane wagon. I purchased a few off ebay to refurbish and bring back to life. The above are pictures of a stanley #5, after about 2 hours of work on 80 grit paper. It’s still quite a ways out. Would you guys consider this one to far gone?


12 replies so far

View skeys's profile

skeys

14 posts in 1133 days


#1 posted 06-18-2015 11:32 PM

It looks like you’re almost there to me. I don’t think you need the entire sole to be perfect. I’d like it to be a bit smoother right in front of and behind the mouth, but other than that it looks like you’re good.

-- Scott K., Virginia https://www.etsy.com/shop/HaresEarDesigns

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2992 posts in 2789 days


#2 posted 06-18-2015 11:47 PM

I agree with Scott. Get the area around the mouth a little bit smoother and it will work fine. Getting the sole perfectly unblemished is not necessary, if anything the pits will reduce friction in use.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View JayT's profile

JayT

5199 posts in 1816 days


#3 posted 06-18-2015 11:54 PM

+2 on the above.

How flat and smooth also depends on how you plan to use it. If you are going to use that one as a jack plane with a cambered iron for rough work, then how smooth isn’t all that critical.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

16396 posts in 2288 days


#4 posted 06-18-2015 11:58 PM

What we have here is a Poor man’s “C” model plane.

Moved it across the wood, any drag to it? Does the sole rock any? No? put it back together, sharpenen the iron up, and put that jack plane back to work. Rub a Parafin candle all over the sole, to the point that the “pits” are filled up. And then put it to work.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View smboudreaux's profile

smboudreaux

51 posts in 2172 days


#5 posted 06-19-2015 12:10 AM

It doesn’t rock at all and I haven’t noticed any drag across the wood. The intended use will be as a jack plane. I was lucky enough to get a #4 smoothing plane in pretty good shape as far as I can tell. Thanks for the input fellas. I’ll finish her out and put her to work

View smboudreaux's profile

smboudreaux

51 posts in 2172 days


#6 posted 06-19-2015 12:11 AM

It doesn’t rock at all and I haven’t noticed any drag across the wood. The intended use will be as a jack plane. I was lucky enough to get a #4 smoothing plane in pretty good shape as far as I can tell. Thanks for the input fellas. I’ll finish her out and put her to work

View sikrap's profile

sikrap

1121 posts in 2963 days


#7 posted 06-19-2015 01:23 AM

If it was a smoother or even a jointer, I’d say to keep going. Since you will be using it as a jack and that usually means coarse work, I’d say to sharpen the iron and see how well it works.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

View Tim's profile

Tim

3323 posts in 1566 days


#8 posted 06-19-2015 01:28 AM

For rough jack plane work it’s probably good enough for the reasons Bandit said. For the record I find a large very coarse file will flatten the bottom of a hand plane much faster than 80 grit paper, but it takes a little bit of file skills to keep/get it flat.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1508 posts in 1634 days


#9 posted 06-19-2015 02:00 AM

I think it adds flavor :) A nice contrast! Straight lines and dimple holes.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4245 posts in 1956 days


#10 posted 06-19-2015 02:05 AM

For jack plane it doesn’t need to be perfect, it looks like it will work fine as it is now.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View TheFridge's profile (online now)

TheFridge

6657 posts in 1090 days


#11 posted 06-19-2015 02:14 AM

You should a #5 that I have. Worse than that. I use it for a scrub so I haven’t touched the bottom.

I’ll echo what they said.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

4226 posts in 1870 days


#12 posted 06-19-2015 02:21 AM

Take what Tim said to heart. Get a good file and carefully secure it in a vise so the sole is just barely above the edges of the vise and start draw filing. I spent 6-8 hours on a Stanley #4 1/2 as the edges were much higher than the sole. Draw filing – Drawing the file from one end of the sole to the other, only in one direction. Don’t try to scrub the sole in both directions, you’ll wear the file out and accomplish little. I found that cleaning the file with a brush was helpful. Patience and time are the key. You can’t rush a good thing. A hand plane, well tune and sharp is a very good thing. It takes time and attention to detail to get there.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com