LumberJocks

How do I pull/remove a DC impeller?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by JasonWagner posted 1798 days ago 2368 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1806 days


1798 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question dust collector impeller

I am mounting the blower of my DC1100 on the wall and want to rotate the blower housing so the outlet will face 90 degrees from where it is now. Now the intake would be down and the outlet will be perpendicular to the wall I want to run the exhaust parallel to. Problem is, I can’t figure out how to pull the impeller from the motor arbor. (there are two screws back there I can’t get to) I know what pulley pullers look like and I don’t see where I would clamp it to pull the impeller off. It’s all smooth except for two holes that are in between some bolts on the impeller. These holes don’t seem like they’d offer any grip for pulling either. I saw Bill Pentz said he switched his DC1100 11” impeller to a 12” impeller used on the DC1200. Maybe there’s a tool I don’t know about?

Here’s a pic: http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/graphics/photos/tools/jetdc1100rvu/impeller200.jpg

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!


12 replies so far

View DaneJ's profile

DaneJ

55 posts in 1835 days


#1 posted 1798 days ago

if the 2 holes are threaded, use a steering wheel puller…

-- Dane, Fairview Pk, OH. The large print giveth and the small print taketh away...

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1806 days


#2 posted 1797 days ago

not threaded and not through-holes….

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View ahock's profile

ahock

102 posts in 1950 days


#3 posted 1797 days ago

I’d tap the holes, pop in two bolts (maybe even eye bolts) and then pull it.

-- Andy, PA ~Finding satisfaction in creation

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

227 posts in 2373 days


#4 posted 1797 days ago

Just a crazy idea… but what is the purpose of those two holes? Are they perhaps an opening to get at 2 screws?

-- NorthWoodsMan

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1809 days


#5 posted 1797 days ago

The impeller is on a keyed shaft. If you have a soft metal drift, close to the diameter of the motor shaft but not larger than. Aluminum or brass would be preferred. Remove the arbor bolt or nut and Spray the shaft with break free or WD40 let sit for a few minutes and then take the drift and put it on the shaft end and rap with a hammer and it should free the impeller up. Parts break down. http://www.retrevo.com/r/22997ag209/10/Assembly#q=Jet+DC-1100A

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 2324 days


#6 posted 1797 days ago

The end nut maybe right hand tread and the fan treaded left hand.

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 2324 days


#7 posted 1797 days ago

How is your impeller coming?

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1806 days


#8 posted 1797 days ago

What’s a metal drift? I’ll try something like that. Thanks RetiredCoastie.

I’m pretty sure it’s not threaded on because of that key he mentioned.

The holes are not through holes…no access to screws.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View ondablade's profile

ondablade

105 posts in 1825 days


#9 posted 1797 days ago

Be careful not to do more than lightly tap the shaft end, or you risk harming the motor bearings. The safest option is probably to pull from threaded holes close to the hub of the fan, while the puller centre bears on the end of the motor shaft. A DIY pullers – a bit of flat strip and three bolts – would be easy too.

A quick touch of carefully placed heat from a gas torch to the impeller (while doing all possible to stop the shaft heating) might loosen it up too, but carries the same risk of doing harm. e.g. cooking the seals/causing the grease to run out of the motor bearings.

With a pullers you can do almost as you like and not do harm…..

-- Late awakener....

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1809 days


#10 posted 1797 days ago

Jason, a drift is a piece of round stock usually made of soft metal or even wood in some cases, used for taping out bolts, roll pins…etc. used to transfer pressure or impact energy to an object without deforming the object you’re trying to remove.

In a lot of cases it is a convenient place to rest the skin of a finger or hand in order to smack said skin with a hammer thus manufacturing blood blisters!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1806 days


#11 posted 1796 days ago

Thanks for all the help guys. I threaded one of the holes, soaked the joint in WD-40, tapped the arbor a few times, then used the arbor bolt as a fulcrum to pull up on the one threaded bolt I added. That was all it took. I’m glad I went back to try to do what I wanted instead of rigging it. I rotated the blower housing to a more usable angle for my situation.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1809 days


#12 posted 1796 days ago

Excellent, glad you got it rotated. Let us know how it turns out.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase