LumberJocks

Relief cut on Dovetails ?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by bonesbr549 posted 06-16-2015 04:41 PM 905 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2527 days


06-16-2015 04:41 PM

I saw somewhere on youtube or an article, that some put a relief cut on the inside face of the drawer side for dovetail joints. This is done to cover that inside face that might show less than perfect joining of the pins-n-tails.

Do any of you do that?, and Second, do you use a shoulder plane and take it off the Tail or pin side?

Oh and one other thing. Do you cut your drawer bottom groove in the sides before or after cutting the dovetails?

Seeking some experienced advice.

Thanks.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.


7 replies so far

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1141 days


#1 posted 06-16-2015 04:55 PM

There is a episode of The Woodwright’s Shop where Chris Schwarz demo’s this method. I really learned to push past my mental block of hand cut dovetails taking a class at Roy’s school and he didn’t teach this method although he did mention it. It does make lining up the boards to transfer the marks onto the 2nd board easier but that hasn’t really ever been as much of a challenge to me as saw technique so I have never really taken the time to do it.

If you cut tails first you would cut the shoulder on the tails board than use that shoulder as a stop to help align the boards when you transfer the marks to the pins board. Remember to reduce the height of your pins by the thickness of your shoulder or you will end up with way more exposed than you plan and might affect the fit of the drawer in the case.

I have cut my grooves for the drawer bottoms both before and after and as long as you plan for them in your layout I’m not sure it makes a huge difference either way.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#2 posted 06-16-2015 05:44 PM

I did it once, after I saw Schwarz do it on Roy’s show. I don’t think it really gained me much, in terms of efficiency or accuracy. Didn’t hurt, either. If you have a good way to clamp up the pieces, I find it easier to just do that and transfer the marks, as opposed to cutting the rabbet, and then having to reset your marking gauge to mark the pins.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13713 posts in 2079 days


#3 posted 06-16-2015 08:01 PM

Do any of you do that?

—I don’t. One more tool to keep incredibly sharp (in order to work well) and another step to what is already an involved hand tool process. High cost, little clear reward / payoff.

Do you cut your drawer bottom groove in the sides before or after cutting the dovetails?

—After. I plan where the groove will go in relation to the dovetails, but ensure it’s right (especially on half blinds) by using the plough plane on dovetailed stock. That way I’m even able to adjust the size of the groove, if need be, to stay hidden within the tail.


-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2527 days


#4 posted 06-16-2015 08:42 PM

Thanks for the feedback.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#5 posted 06-16-2015 10:13 PM

Yes, a shallow rabbet on the inside face of the tails is a great little trick. I think the real usefullness is not hiding anything (its on the inside) but the real advantage is lining up for pin marking is much, much more accurate.

Ideally you would use a rabbet plane with a fence and nicker, but you could use a shoulder plane to a marking gauge line with a guide. If you’re not averse to power tools, you can use a tenon jig and cut height to a scribed line. Very fast and accurate.

I always cut the groove first. I learned to cut DT’s the Frank Klausz way and I think its the best and fastest way I’ve seen yet. All the measuring, calipers, marking, angle gauges and saw guides – they are all unnecessary because, as Klauzs says, just eyeball it—this let people know they are hand cut (only talking about drawers here).

Cutting the groove first is the most fool proof way of ensuring you have hidden it in a tail. I’ve never had it interfere with cutting the DT’s as some people say.

You’ll hear people talk about the method of assembling the drawer or box and then routing a groove. I think this is an unnecessary way to do it every time you take a DT apart you are widening the gaps plus you have to deal with the rounded corners.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View knockknock's profile

knockknock

337 posts in 1633 days


#6 posted 06-16-2015 10:45 PM

...Cutting the groove first is the most fool proof way of ensuring you have hidden it in a tail…
- Robert Engel

I gang cut my tails with the boards face to face (outside face). So I lay out the tails on the inside, if I miss, my pencil falls in the groove :)

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#7 posted 06-17-2015 10:06 AM

Not sure what you mean there, but you are right about gang cutting its not only faster, but you can be more accurate with your 90 degrees.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com