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steel city 26" drum sander

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Forum topic by , posted 09-15-2009 07:18 AM 2524 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


09-15-2009 07:18 AM

Need some advice. I just bought this drum sander that I found to be in like new condition for 1150.00 off of CL. I good deal I think. I did a maple glue up and had the owner demo it for me and it sanded the glue up completely flat on both sides. I was impressed since all of our sanding up to date is done with a Bosch and Ridgid ROS. Recently I did a butcher block with a 3 by 21 porter cable belt and ridgid ROS. I am looking for tips and advice. The demo glue up was flattened nicely which I see will save me a lot of time and elbow grease but I did notice there are a lot of linear scratches in the maple. The owner had a new 80 grit paper on the first drum and old worn 120 grit on the second drum. Maybe this is why the 120 did not get some of the scratches out. How should I adjust and what grits should I stick with. Since I am looking more for flushing glue ups, not planing but more of a finished sanding. I know I will still need to do some ROS at the end but I am looking for best case set up. I have thought about trying 120 on both drums.

Also, any recommendations on sand paper sources.

I have not set it in my shop yet. I primarily have worked with oak, hickory, beech and maple. I am looking for a process that will cut down some of the ROS or some of the scratches. I actually think some of the scratches may have been because of new 80 grit combined with old worn 120 grit being used. Also, maple tends to scratch up or rather show scratches in finish and is less forgiving.

Any help will be appreciated.

Thanks,

Jerry

-- .


4 replies so far

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3008 days


#1 posted 09-15-2009 07:27 AM

I think all drum sanders have linear scratches in them. We use 120 on a drum sander and then ROS with 120 and above to get the linear scratches out. On our wide belt we have 120 on the infeed and 180 on the outfeed and still have to ROS the panels, counter tops or whatever. I have a friend that uses 220 on a drum sander and he burns a lot of belts and using the 220 he still has to ROS it.

bruc

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2718 posts in 2752 days


#2 posted 09-15-2009 04:53 PM

First, make sure there is no glue on the surface you’re sanding. It will clog the belt. I usually knock it off with a scraper and a belt sander. I think you’re right about the belts that are on the machine. The 80 is leaving scratches that the worn 120 is not removing. Since you’re not “surfacing” as you said, maybe you don’t need the 80 grit. You might also try using 180 for the second head. You will have to experiment till you find the finish that suites you. Don’t expect too much out of this type sander though. It won’t give the finish a wide belt sander will, but there is a huge price difference between the two. Plan on using a ROS to finish up.

Klingspore is a great source for all your sandpaper. I would check them out.

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#3 posted 09-16-2009 05:34 PM

Thank you both for the advice. I think I am going to experiment a little. I am sure the linear scratches will not be a problem with some light duty ROS work. I am sure my ROS will make light work of the scratches. The biggest sanding issue I wanted to conquer was flattening the board after glue up and possibly running the whole door after it is built to ensure all the styles and rails are flush.

Any ideas out there regarding possibly wrapping my drums with a hook and loop pad and using hook and loop paper.

-- .

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3008 days


#4 posted 09-16-2009 10:05 PM

When you flatten your first door with the sander you’ll wonder why you didn’t buy one sooner.

bruc

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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