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Table saw bogging down and stopping half way through cut

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Forum topic by saltcod posted 06-11-2015 01:25 PM 2525 views 0 times favorited 50 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


06-11-2015 01:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw

Hey all!

I’m a beginner — the title of this post gave that away =) — and I have a beginner table saw question.

I’ve got an old Delta contractor saw that my dad used to own — one with the tubular rails and the hard-to-true fence.

When I rip even thin 3/4 stock, my saw gets really bogged down. By the time I get to a 3-4 foot piece, the saw will sometimes even stop! The breaker hasn’t tripped yet but the saw blade has actually brought up solid in the wood!

So the question then is, what’s happening?

— I’m using a 60T crosscut blade — I probably shouldn’t be ripping with this, but it should still do the job? Maybe needs to be sharpened?
— The fence is extremely finnicky. Very difficult to set to true. Is is just jamming because it’s isn’t getting fed in straight?

Thanks!


50 replies so far

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

250 posts in 637 days


#1 posted 06-11-2015 01:31 PM

Just my gut thought, the wood is pinching on itself, no riving knife on that saw, causing the blade to a stop. When the saw starts to bind, is the beginning of the cut closed up?

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saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


#2 posted 06-11-2015 01:44 PM

The cut actually starts pretty good. For the first half, things really go along smoothly. I think it might be the wood pinching the back of the blade, yeah.

So I guess it is fence related.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2227 days


#3 posted 06-11-2015 01:47 PM

I agree with ste6168 above. What appears to be happening is that stresses in the wood due to drying are released when the wood is cut causing the gap (saw kerf) to close around the blade. This can be pretty much eliminated by using a riving knife the same width as the blade located just behind the saw blade. Also, make sure the saw blade is cleaned of resin from past use. I use plain ole oven cleaner for the job. Works great, smells awful, and irritates the hands and skin. Don’t breathe the mist from the spray can.

Suggestion: Try other pieces of a different wood to see if you have the same problem. If not, its the stressed wood as mentioned above. If you have the same problem, it may be that your fence and saw blade are not parallel. In essence, you are pushing wood “sideways” through the saw. Most saw fences have a way of adjusting the fence angle, usually by loosening a couple of bolts.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#4 posted 06-11-2015 01:48 PM

60T is a lot, but it also depends on the particular blade. Get a good quality blade with fewer teeth for most ripping….keep it clean and sharp. It’s best to flatten and straighten wood prior to ripping….wood that’s rocking and twisting puts more resistance on the saw. The saw’s alignment is always really important. Check that the fence is flat and perferctly aligned with the blade and the splitter.

http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View saltcod's profile

saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


#5 posted 06-11-2015 01:51 PM

thanks for the blade resource! I definitely need to get a decent rip blade.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1762 days


#6 posted 06-11-2015 01:53 PM

Get half way through and turn your wood end over end and finish that way. Make sure your blade and fence re parallel to each other.

View saltcod's profile

saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


#7 posted 06-11-2015 01:54 PM

Thanks dhazelton. I’ve been doing that, but it leaves an awful edge when you pull it back. Love to juts be able to push straight through — a fairly basic requirement =)

View saltcod's profile

saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


#8 posted 06-11-2015 01:57 PM

man that’s a lot of info about blades.

I’d love the tl;dr version =)

“Buy this rip blade: “

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3557 posts in 2027 days


#9 posted 06-11-2015 01:58 PM

What Ste168 said

Also with the small horsepower on the motor a thin kerf saw blade is best to use also.

I do not know you but I will loan you a DVD I have on Tablesaws on how to fix them and maintain them.
Just send me a PM with your mailing info if you wish to borrow it.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#10 posted 06-11-2015 01:58 PM

There is 2 types of this older saw, the one I have the motor is below the saw table but is internally belt driven, and I have tripped the reset button on mine once. The other style the motor in in back of the saw with a external belt. What concerns me is that the saw is not tripping its overload. It could be if you have the external belt driven saw a loose belt or and worn out belt.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View saltcod's profile

saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


#11 posted 06-11-2015 02:01 PM

Conifur — it’s a Delta XL-10 — about 20-25 years old by now I’d say. Direct drive. Not a belt in site!

Yeah….it’s extremely unsafe. The blade just locks up and then un-locks-up at any time when you pull the stock back.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#12 posted 06-11-2015 02:04 PM



man that s a lot of info about blades.

I d love the tl;dr version =)

“Buy this rip blade: “

- saltcod

Irwin Marples 24T – ~ $30

Freud Diablo 24T – ~$30

The 40T version of either would also be good for general purpose stuff.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

844 posts in 2441 days


#13 posted 06-11-2015 02:04 PM

Do you have any type of splitter/riving knife? If not, you should look into making a zero clearance insert (ZCI) that incorporates a splitter. On my previous saw, I always used a small piece of wood glued into the kerf slot as a splitter (see this link). Another option is the MJ Splitter from MicroJig. I’ve never used them but read lots of good reviews.

View saltcod's profile

saltcod

69 posts in 618 days


#14 posted 06-11-2015 02:06 PM

I’ve thought about that too. Frank Howarth has made some of these as well https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U66tr4r0Pyc

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

844 posts in 2441 days


#15 posted 06-11-2015 02:06 PM

If blade stops, do not pull back the stock…turn the saw off and figure out/fix what caused the bind up :)

...
Yeah….it s extremely unsafe. The blade just locks up and then un-locks-up at any time when you pull the stock back.

- saltcod


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