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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 06-08-2015 04:59 PM 864 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


06-08-2015 04:59 PM

I’m making my own veneer and then running it through my drum sander for final surfacing/thicknessing.
(QSWO/80 & 120 grits/using a sled) and I’m having trouble with burning.

I’m thinking I started out too thin, but I’m looking for rec’s on how you do it or if I’m doing something wrong.

My technique:

Resawed to about .080 (just under 3/32).

Lost 1/2 the thickness after drum sanding (down to .045 or so), but just on the last couple passes I got some burning. Backed off depth and ran again no help. I even tried letting it cool down a bit, but apparently not enough.

Here are my thoughts and I’d appreciate any input:

1. The heat is building up due to thinness.
2. Maybe 120 grit on second drum is too fine?

FWIW, I just read a FWW article they say start out with at least 1/8 thick veneer.

TIA,
Robert

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


13 replies so far

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Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#1 posted 06-08-2015 05:45 PM

What feed belt speed are you running? Maybe speeding it up a little will help.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#2 posted 06-08-2015 05:52 PM

What are you applying the veneer to?
I would be inclined to sand it only enough to get consistent thickness and do my finish sanding after glueing to the substrate. I do marquetry with sawn veneers and none get sanded prior to cutting and assembly. You should be able to end up with 1/16” or better which is just better than thinner in many ways.

As for the burning, I found that switching to hook and loop solved my problems on my dual drum sander.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#3 posted 06-08-2015 05:58 PM



What feed belt speed are you running? Maybe speeding it up a little will help.

- Fred Hargis

Not an option for me.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#4 posted 06-08-2015 06:01 PM



What are you applying the veneer to?
I would be inclined to sand it only enough to get consistent thickness and do my finish sanding after glueing to the substrate. I do marquetry with sawn veneers and none get sanded prior to cutting and assembly. You should be able to end up with 1/16” or better which is just better than thinner in many ways.

As for the burning, I found that switching to hook and loop solved my problems on my dual drum sander.

- shipwright

The substrate will be solid wood.

I understand what you’re saying but the way I want to bookmatch it both sides need to be good.

I actually did just switch to H&L thinking it was only one drum. The other drum is lined with felt but I haven’t switched it yet (trying to use up a roll of paper).

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#5 posted 06-08-2015 07:39 PM

You will be sanding after the bookmatching anyway, so I don’t understand why you need perfect surfaces. If they are sanded enough to see the grain clearly you can make the match. The quality of the match is in the edges not the surfaces. What am I missing?

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#6 posted 06-09-2015 12:48 AM

The faces alternate when you flip them to bookmatch so its cut surface up/jointed surface up.

Is it ok to glue an unsanded sawn surface down?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 640 days


#7 posted 06-09-2015 01:08 AM



Is it ok to glue an unsanded sawn surface down?

- Robert Engel

I would not. But I would leave unsanded surfaces up and sand the entire surface after all of the veneer is applied.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#8 posted 06-09-2015 02:10 AM

As long as the surface is even unsanded is better than sanded for glueing. That is the purpose of a toothing plane in glueing sawn veneer. To do it even better you could tooth the substrate as well. All of the veneer in this marquetry is sawn and unsanded. I’m not worried about it failing.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#9 posted 06-11-2015 03:20 PM

shipwright—you are no doubt the man and I appreciate your suggestions.

Went to use my bandsaw yesterday and noticed the fence seemed WAY out, and duh, it dawned on my I knew I was getting too much washboarding in the cuts and was having to do way more sanding than I thought.

Just didn’t put 2 and 2 together. Realigned fence to drift angle, made some test cuts and voila!

I probably don’t even need to run it through the sander but if I do one pass will probably be all it takes.
My main reason for doing that is to get a uniform thickness.

My next question is what kind of toothing plane do you use?
The only blades I can find so far are for block planes.

Seems I saw someone use a scraper plane with toothed blade?

How do you do it?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#10 posted 06-12-2015 12:40 AM

This is my toothing plane.
You don’t really need to tooth if you know the surface is flat. Roughing it up with coarse sandpaper or a scrape with a hacksaw blade will do. What a toothing plane really does is to show up and even out bumps and hollows.
If you want to make one Lee Valley sells toothing blades.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#11 posted 06-13-2015 12:10 PM

Thanks.

Now that I’ve gotten my resaw setup straightend out, I’m giving it another try.
I’ll resaw a bit thicker this time and the sawn surface won’t require so much prepping.

If I were to get a toothing blade, how fine should it be?
I’ll be using it on QSWO.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#12 posted 06-13-2015 02:47 PM

Get the fine one.
I would also recommend hide glue. This sort of job could be hammer veneered with hot hide glue or if you aren’t up to the learning curve on that you could use liquid hide glue like Old Brown Glue. It has many advantages.
Check out this blog series, particularly the video in the first segment.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#13 posted 06-15-2015 11:47 AM

Thanks Paul that they are both good resources for me.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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