LumberJocks

Trouble with Grizzly tools?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by alittleoff posted 06-08-2015 02:38 PM 1282 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

296 posts in 740 days


06-08-2015 02:38 PM

Is it me or am I seeing a lot more post with people having trouble with Grizzly tools? I’ve noticed numerous post lately about table saws and band saws having trouble. Could Grizzly’s quality control gone down, or is it the fact that they sell so many that it is normal. Or is it just me.
Gerald


14 replies so far

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#1 posted 06-08-2015 02:51 PM

I see the same thing on here Gerald.

But traffic in general has been lower, so maybe it seems to be a higher percentage of the total posts? Don’t know, but keep in mind you always hear about the bad service, and rarely about the good.

Still, it seems like a lot of trouble with Tablesaws lately.

Haven’t been hearing a lot negative on Jointers and bandsaws

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 688 days


#2 posted 06-08-2015 03:30 PM

I see some but they’re generally the same issues that are already well known with the table saws. I haven’t seen many new problems that would make me think they’re having more quality control issues.

At least I haven’t had any major issues with any of my Grizzly tools. The only hiccup I had was a tablesaw motor that had a bad start capacitor when it arrived. Easy fix though.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4452 posts in 3424 days


#3 posted 06-08-2015 03:37 PM

My Grizz tools have been quite good. Table saw, bandsaw, lathe without probs. I’m a Grizz fan, and any issues or questions have been quickly addressed by customer or tech service.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2529 days


#4 posted 06-08-2015 06:27 PM

I’ve seen a lot of inquiries regarding buying and owning Grizzly tools lately, with people asking about reported trouble with some Grizzly tools. I think that Grizzly may be having issues with one of their newer hybrid table saws. I have not really noticed an uptick in the # of postings about having actual problems. I am a Grizzly fan in regards to my table saw, jointer and oscillating spindle sander. I have not had a single problem with any of my floor model tools from them. I am sure that they, like everyone else have some lower quality produced tools, mostly in the smaller hand tool areas that do not quite measure up. I can’t speak for their entire line, but I will definitely recommend the 1023RL table saw or the G6040ZX jointer or the G1071 oscillating spindle sander which I own and am very happy with. They are a great value and have had a low cost of ownership ($0); and have been and done everything that I expected of them.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View Alan72's profile

Alan72

187 posts in 1497 days


#5 posted 06-09-2015 05:02 AM

I recently bought 2 new Grizzly tools 17” annv. BS and g1071 spindle sander and had no issues with either of them. I did my homework looked at the pros and cons, I’am very happy with my purchases. Look at Jet when they came out with their 8” and 10” Jointer/Planer combo, it seemed like every review I read was horrible. Every company has their low end, entry level equipment. We as consumors must do everything we can not to have buyers remorse.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 640 days


#6 posted 06-09-2015 07:16 AM

I suspect that it is a combination of both factors plus we are posting more as well.

To remain competitive production moves to countries that provide cheep labor but cheep quality control results. Since product of almost all stationary power tools are moving overseas they will all encounter these problems. Some may spend more to detect defects before the customer receives the tool.

I don’t have any data as to what percentage of the tool market Grizzly has but I suspect they sell quite a few tools. Increased sales result in more defects produced and delivered.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View KellyB's profile

KellyB

77 posts in 646 days


#7 posted 06-09-2015 12:37 PM

I just bought the Grizzly 1023RL a month ago and was extremely pleased with both pre-sales talks with tech support and the saw when it arrived. A mix up in shipping (not Grizzly’s doing) was quickly resolved.

Haven’t actually used the saw a lot yet, but setup and initial measurements were spot on out of the box! And yes, I couldn’t resist the nickel-on-edge test which it passed with flying colors.

I don’t doubt there are lemon flavored machines that get through, and feel sad for the folks who get them, but I am fortunate so far with my new baby.

View Adrock1's profile

Adrock1

43 posts in 670 days


#8 posted 06-09-2015 02:27 PM

I’ve recently purchased three grizzly machines. A hybrid table saw, 2hp dust collector, and 6” jointer. Overall I’m very pleased.

I have had some issues with the saw. When I first got it I noticed a very subtle noise from the motor. I thought it was probably nothing but in an abundance of caution I contacted grizzly. They promptly sent a new motor and let me keep the old one.

Honestly in hind sight I think the original motor was probably just fine. That was good customer service as far as I’m concerned.

Subsequently, the motor pulley started slipping off the motor shaft causing some problems. Shortly after I reported that grizzly sent a communication to all owners of the saw that this was a manufacturing defect and they were shipping new pulleys to all customers free of charge.

By that time though I had already sent the saw back and grizzly is replacing it with a brand new saw with the corrected pulley.

All said that was a major pain in the butt to deal with but Grizzly was exceptional in their response toy problems and they are going beyond their warranty agreement to make it right. Assuming the new saw is good to go I can give grizzly a pass on this one. Every company turns out a lemon now and then. Its how they treat the customer when that happens that matters.

The thing you have to keep in mind as well is that grizzly offers a decent (not top of the line) product for a very good price. They do it by sourcing the manufacturing overseas. Largely to China. The result in general is a good value. Your equipment dollar can go pretty far with grizzly. You just have to understand the potential downside of doing business with a company that operates like that. And most of the manufacturers now are doing the same thing.

If they were making these machines in the states they would cost twice as much and you could debate whether they would be any better. The only benefit would be that when a manufacturing defect crops up that it would be contained more efficiently. Now when there is an issue grizzly doesnt know it till they have recieved a shipment of a thousand saws and sent half of them to a customer. That business model exposes you to risk from a consumer perception standpoint. Its just the nature of the beast.

Personally I’ll almost certainly buy more grizzly stuff.

View nkawtg's profile

nkawtg

204 posts in 715 days


#9 posted 06-09-2015 02:44 PM

My biggest gripe with Grizzly is a simple thing really. An accessory dust shroud for their G0505 planer. I ordered it back in March and it might not be in till August.
How hard can it be to get them made and shipped.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2529 days


#10 posted 06-09-2015 03:58 PM

nkawtg: Getting replacement parts for a lot of things has really gotten to be a pain in recent years. Nobody wants to stock things, and want to rely on JIT inventory practices. Plus the manufacturers won’t make a one off item. They wait until they have a sufficient number for a production run and then make them and ship them. I had a belt sander in the shop for a WARRANTY repair a few years back for nearly 4 months waiting for a part. My riding mower was down for 16 months, because good old Briggs and Stratton, a supposedly reputable American company didn’t have an electrical part. I finally gave up and told the dealer to keep the mower, it wasn’t doing me any good. And then lo and behold they called about a month later and said “your mower is done” I didn’t believe it. I think that company bean counters have raised so much stink about parts inventory levels that companies would rather screw their customers than listen to the pencil necked geeks whine. For the most part, with exceptions (Grizzly being one of the better)...customer service in America is DEAD. That is as far as I am taking this, my favorite rant for today.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 688 days


#11 posted 06-09-2015 04:37 PM



nkawtg: Getting replacement parts for a lot of things has really gotten to be a pain in recent years. Nobody wants to stock things, and want to rely on JIT inventory practices. Plus the manufacturers won t make a one off item. They wait until they have a sufficient number for a production run and then make them and ship them. I had a belt sander in the shop for a WARRANTY repair a few years back for nearly 4 months waiting for a part. My riding mower was down for 16 months, because good old Briggs and Stratton, a supposedly reputable American company didn t have an electrical part. I finally gave up and told the dealer to keep the mower, it wasn t doing me any good. And then lo and behold they called about a month later and said “your mower is done” I didn t believe it. I think that company bean counters have raised so much stink about parts inventory levels that companies would rather screw their customers than listen to the pencil necked geeks whine. For the most part, with exceptions (Grizzly being one of the better)...customer service in America is DEAD. That is as far as I am taking this, my favorite rant for today.

- Woodbum

I’m a farmer and the backordering of important parts has been steadily increasing and become more and more frustrating.
I get to a point where I can’t have a machine down and there are times where I have to insist on a loaner tractor to keep going. You’re right, customer service is non existent.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1471 days


#12 posted 06-09-2015 05:04 PM

Back on point … I got my new Grizzly lathe less than a month ago, and so far I haven’t had any “big” issues with it.

Last week while turning I heard a “thump, thump” noise start to manifest. It changed with the speed of the motor so first thing I did was open the access door to the belt & pulleys. The bottom pulley had slipped to one side, forcing the belt to be out of alignment. Took me 2 minutes to diagnose the issue and less than 5 minutes to fix it. Wasn’t enough of a problem to bitch about so I didn’t even call Grizzly.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Richard H's profile (online now)

Richard H

489 posts in 1144 days


#13 posted 06-09-2015 05:16 PM

The thing that stands out to me from the posts I read about Grizzly both good and bad is their customer service. We here various stories on here about people having issues with Grizzly hardware and it seems like they all have a common theme of a support organization working with the customer to make things right. Now my preference would be good quality control that makes it so these kinds of issues never reach the customer but I don’t think there is a manufacturer of woodworking tools around especially in the consumer market that comes close to meeting that goal anymore so barring that excellent post sales customer service seems the next best thing.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

493 posts in 2786 days


#14 posted 06-09-2015 05:22 PM

First, customer service is not dead “we” just don’t want to pay for it. I have two companies, really one but I operate two distinct supply chains. I sell the exact same products but they are distributed in a bare bones and a value added chain. The bare bone chain is often near half the price of the full service chain BUT if you have an issue (unless it is a picking or shipping error) my customers are on their own to deal with the manufacturer and their warranty in the value added chain an issue will be handled immediately, completely new item sent ASAP with a return shipping for the problem item paid for. After service tech support is covered through that supply chain as well, but the buyer will pay basically full MSRP or MAPP. I have thousands of happy customers on both sides, problems only arise when someone buys from the low cost chain and expects full retail service.

Lower end (ie most Chiwanese imports, but not all) woodworking machines are dirt cheap in the big picture, though we may not see it that way. Grizzly works at the bottom end of the price spectrum for most of their machines discussed on hobby forums. They sell product at the low point of what is acceptable for the job and for many (most ?) hobbyists the quality and engineering is fully acceptable less so for those accustom to machines built by Northfield, (the original) Oliver, Yates American etc. Grizzly’s operation is designed toward the lowest price and their customer service is lauded as great BUT it is only acceptable at the price point. Every manufacturer/reseller deals with long parts lead times since everything is run in batches and offshore be it Europe or Asia, this is required to meet the price point people demand, in general you want better after sales service, pay more up front. Every manufacturer is going to have problem product and it is very true for woodworking machines that have to be shipped thousands of miles by carriers that are looking to save every penny (again based on their customers).

Grizzly is what it is and as long as the buyer goes in with their eyes open they will probably be satisfied if you want better service and or better machines you need to pay more and look to the better Chiwanese importers like Powermatic, spend your money with the Europeans like Felder and SCMI or spend your money in the US with Northfield. Grizzly (at the hobby level) provides bare bones machines with plenty of over the phone and through the mail support for the price but innovation isn’t their gig, don’t expect a innovative 17” bandsaw for $1,200 or a forward thinking cabinet saw for $1,500, expect a bare bones machine and you will likely be happy.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com