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Forum topic by LuLuBean posted 06-08-2015 02:37 PM 843 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LuLuBean

9 posts in 964 days


06-08-2015 02:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe help novice turner parts

General Apologies: I am not a turner so my lingo probably won’t be correct.

I have a delta Cat. No.46-204P that I picked up used for about $300. It came with a large variety of Robert Sorby turning tools and lots of unmarked tools. The problem is that the center (tailstock) that is on the machine is very small and sharp. I can turn some things if I really crank everything tight, however the center will bury itself in the piece because it is so sharp. Also, it doesn’t seem to turn on any bearings, it is fixed in place during the turning. I am wondering if this is by design (dead center?) or if there is something that needs to be replaced, and where is a good source to buy replacement parts. Thanks for any advice that can be given to this novice turner.


9 replies so far

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3207 days


#1 posted 06-08-2015 02:48 PM

yep that is a dead center.

Usually these are in the tail stock

If you retract the point with teh handwheel solidly to bottom it out, it will pop out and you can put a live center in it.

To install, just put a wood block over the tip and give it a whack with a mallet to seat it.

It is just a friction fit of the “Morse Taper” There are different shaped tips available.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View LuLuBean's profile

LuLuBean

9 posts in 964 days


#2 posted 06-08-2015 02:51 PM

Wonderful! I just popped out the dead center and am going to buy a live center for it. Thanks DrDirt

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#3 posted 06-08-2015 03:44 PM

Be SURE to keep the tapers clean both inside and outside. No dings, burrs, etc.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View ClayandNancy's profile

ClayandNancy

511 posts in 2480 days


#4 posted 06-08-2015 03:54 PM

Not a turner but am interested in getting a lathe and start. I have done some research, but that question never came up. What is the dead center used for?

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Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2228 days


#5 posted 06-08-2015 04:46 PM

ClayandNancy: The dead center such as LuLuBean had was just that – a dead center that did not revolve with the wood. You were supposed to smear some type of lubricant, normally bees wax, on it so as not to burn the wood while turning. This thing has been replaced with a “live” center with bearings, that turn with the wood. The dead center labeling has moved to the lathe head, and has two or more projections that enter the wood slightly to allow the unit to turn the object to be turned. In the “olden days” we did not have a dead center for the head stock. We made a wooden face plate that was threaded and screwed onto the lathe head, and in turn glued or screwed to the object to be turned. Sure am glad them days are over! A chuck with removable jaws is now used to attach the object to the lathe, or in some cases a face plate is still be used – depending on the size of object to be turned.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3207 days


#6 posted 06-09-2015 04:07 AM

LuLu Bean… make sure that the little handwheel is NOT still bottomed out when you go to put the new center in.

Give the wheel a couple spins, then drive it in with a couple whacks. I put a piece of 2X4 over the tip and hit it with my deadblow (not hard) you just want the friction to grab it, because you will have it under pressure holding your workpiece in use.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#7 posted 06-09-2015 04:16 AM

Give the wheel a couple spins, then drive it in with a couple whacks. I put a piece of 2X4 over the tip and hit it with my deadblow (not hard) you just want the friction to grab it, because you will have it under pressure holding your workpiece in use.

- DrDirt

I’ve never needed to ‘whack’ a center… Just popping it in combined with the pressure of applying it to the workpiece is all that has been needed. I imagine if your tapers are dirty, then forcing it in like that could actually damage the taper. Just MHO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View LuLuBean's profile

LuLuBean

9 posts in 964 days


#8 posted 06-10-2015 04:31 PM

So I am trying to make this. The part of the picture you cant see is just a straight taper. I have some probably very basic questions.

1. I can round the square stock, but my roughing gouge will only go so close to it. What is the technique to get the crisp transition from square to round. Do you use the parting tool?

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 766 days


#9 posted 06-10-2015 06:33 PM

That section of the leg is called the pummel (sometimes pommel). A parting tool will probably leave a rough torn surface/corner. It is normally cut with a skew or a spindle gouge and either should be very sharp, as in razor.
You would be cutting straight so the bevel angel of the tool must be 90* to the work.
With the skew you cut a little, clear away from the waste side, cut a little more, clear away… much like a one-sided V cut.
With the spindle gouge the curve of the blade clears away waste as you go deeper.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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