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Question about Joinery for Birch Ply

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Forum topic by jmeter posted 06-08-2015 11:38 AM 758 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jmeter

11 posts in 549 days


06-08-2015 11:38 AM

Topic tags/keywords: chair joints plywood

Hello,

I am a relatively new woodworker looking for some advice.

I am building a chair/swing that I will be suspending from a metal I-beam in my apartment. I would like to build it out of birch plywood and make something similar to this chair: http://www.2dots.co/2012/09/the-chair-x-pierre-thibault.html

However, I am unsure how this is joined. Would biscuits be appropriate/strong enough?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!


8 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2145 posts in 1637 days


#1 posted 06-08-2015 12:54 PM

This looks like just butt joints and miter joints. With out knowing how you intend to suspend it. Porbably not biscuits don’t add a lot of strength to a joint.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#2 posted 06-08-2015 01:31 PM

Throw the bizkuts away.

Maybe screw and plug. Maybe just dowel. I would glue, screw and plug this project. Buy a plug cutter and some maple. Usually maple can be easier to find than birch and it looks very close.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View jmeter's profile

jmeter

11 posts in 549 days


#3 posted 06-08-2015 01:32 PM

I am planning on stringing rope through near the top of the back and also towards the front of the seat. It will look similar to this image, but the chair would be made of wood, not fabric: http://britco.s3.amazonaws.com/list_images/originals/2014/f3bb80ae-aa96-4d51-993b-7a99bc89edf8_20140130T033658.jpg.650x650_q85.jpg

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#4 posted 06-08-2015 01:36 PM

I’m on the fence about biscuits. I think they would work in this case (maybe) but it would be a PITA to figure out the angles on a biscuit joiner fence. Your cuts in the mating pieces have to be made at 90º, and I’m not sure you could pull that off on that piece; very few parts are at 90º to each other. the picture does seem to be just butt joints,, but if the piece is made to sit on the floor they may be strong enough. I thnk if i was going to suspend it, I’d want to beef up the design with a frame that formed a “floor” under it, and then suspend that piece.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#5 posted 06-08-2015 03:27 PM

I would run the rope all the way to the bottom piece of plywood…don’t attach it at the back. You could drill a hole in top piece to run it through to a hole in the bottom

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 945 days


#6 posted 06-09-2015 12:52 AM

I agree with SirIrb.

Screws and plugs. Wouldn’t used dowels not much glue strength in the plys.
For the same reason biscuits won’t work. You just can’t glue the edges of ply very well.

Edge banding with solid wood would dress it up.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 597 days


#7 posted 06-09-2015 01:06 AM

Glue and nails would be strong enough. I would also put end panels, set inside, to strengthen it up.
That would be the easiest, but screws and plugging the hole would be nice.
I’ve never had problems gluing the edges of plywood, (I don’t use imported plywood of any type) and some banding on the edges would dress it up.

-- -

View jmeter's profile

jmeter

11 posts in 549 days


#8 posted 06-09-2015 01:18 AM

Awesome, thanks for the info guys! I think I will try my hand with the plug cutter. I’ll also drill some holes in the top and run the rope down to the bottom panel.

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