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Router for use on a Grizzly 1023SLWX router-table extension

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Forum topic by macdaddy posted 09-11-2009 09:55 PM 2161 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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macdaddy

6 posts in 2796 days


09-11-2009 09:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: grizzly router tablesaw 1023slwx

I’m trying to find an appropriate router for use on the Grizzly 1023SLWX that I’m getting ready to order. That tablesaw comes with the router table extension. I’ve got several questions.

The plate on the Grizzly table is supposed to be standard and mate with most any router, they claim. I’d like to confirm this with someone that knows for sure or actually owns one.

Since the router will be mounted upside down and won’t be easily accessible for adjustments I’m guessing that I need a fixed base router with some sort of dial adjustment for bit depth. I was at Lowes last night and found 3 that seemed to be along the lines of what I’d expect. The Porter Cable and Bosch models had a clamping mechanism to hold the base at a certain depth and either a ring that spun around the motor (Porter Cable) or a dial (Bosch) to adjust it. The Dewalt combo model didn’t appear to have a clamp but had a ring around the motor that actually worked (compared to the Porter Cable on display). The Dewalt was $219, $200 for the Bosch and $260 for the Porter Cable. I liked the Dewalt because it seemed to be the easiest to adjust, especially one-handed. Thoughts?

Also, since the router is going to be mounted upside down I’m a little concerned that shavings or chunks will end up falling into the vent openings and end up in a motor winding. Is this something to be concerned about? Is there a way to mitigate this or are there routers that don’t have this problem?

How many HP would a router in this application need? 2.25HP or bigger?

Thanks Justin


7 replies so far

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knotscott

7215 posts in 2840 days


#1 posted 09-11-2009 10:58 PM

I can’t comment about which routers will fit your application, but with some ingenuity, most should.

A 2hp router (11-13 amp) should be adequate for all but extended sessions with huge bits, but if you’re going to bother buying a new dedicated table router, might as well get a 15 amp 3hp. Unless you stumble into a great deal on a smaller one, or if a smaller has the features you want there’s not much advantage going smaller.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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thiel

374 posts in 2756 days


#2 posted 09-13-2009 04:31 AM

Generally you need 2.25 hp minimum if you’re going to swing any big bits on a router table.

The Grizz router extension (if memory serves) doesn’t have a “lift out” plate, so you have got to get under there to make any adjustments. That in mind, I’d really recommend looking at the Triton since it allows above-the-table bit and collete removal and adjustement. Whatever you put under there is gonna be a pain to remove, so I’d make it something you don’t have to!

As for chips in the motor I’ve never heard of this problem; mounting a router upside-down is pretty standard stuff. Once in a while give it a spray with compressed air if you’re worried.

-- Laziness minus Apathy equals Efficiency

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macdaddy

6 posts in 2796 days


#3 posted 09-13-2009 07:29 PM

Thanks for the replies.

I hadn’t heard of Triton until you mentioned them. I looked at their 2 models and they look slick. The one thing their webpage and video didn’t answer was if depth could be adjusted from above. I’m also not sure if their base will fit on the fixed base of the Grizzly. That’s really something that Grizzly should change. Instead of a hole and underneath mounting bracket they should make it a removable plate.

I suppose I could also forget about getting the Grizzly with the built-in route table and just get one with a nice extension deck and a dedicated router table instead. The upside is that it would make handling sheets of hardwood plywood easier on the table saw. The downside is that I don’t really have room for a dedicated route table and a table saw at the moment. That was one major pro of getting the Grizzly kit.

Does anyone know how long Grizzly has made the router table extension? If it’s new then perhaps I could expect them to come out with a new table in a year or so that has a removal plate.

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macdaddy

6 posts in 2796 days


#4 posted 09-13-2009 07:44 PM

What do you guys think of the Freud FT3000VCE? From the reviews and spec sheet it sounds like all adjustments can be made from above which is good. I may have to drill a hole in the Grizzly table to reach it but that’s to be expected with any routers I imagine. It is a bit pricey though.

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knotscott

7215 posts in 2840 days


#5 posted 09-13-2009 09:40 PM

The FT3000 should be a great choice. I’ve had the FT1700 for a couple of years now and love it in the router because of those great above table features. I’ve seen the FT3000 demoed at the shows, and can only imagine that a bigger motor is a plus. I also have a very nice Milwaukee 5625 that I use for heavy duty tasks like raising panels, but otherwise, the FT1700 is my “go to” table router and it spends the vast majority of it’s time there.

My previous Freud router was the older style FT2000, and it was also a good tool. It didn’t offer the above table features, and the throat opening was smaller than the larger bits, but it was a strong running router.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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macdaddy

6 posts in 2796 days


#6 posted 09-14-2009 04:23 AM

I just placed my order for the Grizzly 1023SLWX, an assortment of Freud and Forrest blades, and the Freud FT3000. However now I’m wondering if I should instead cancel the FT3000 and replace it with a 35HP Milwaukee 5625-20. The price is lower than the Freud. However the reviews also say that sometimes the 1/2” collet isn’t included and has to be ordered separately. That gets the price up within spitting distance of the Freud. I figure I have until morning to cancel and replace the Freud. Both seem like good units. I’m at a loss to pick one over the other without having my hands on either or both. I suppose it’s instant buyer’s remorse that will last at least until I make my first cuts.

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knotscott

7215 posts in 2840 days


#7 posted 09-14-2009 11:08 AM

Justin – The 5625 is a hoss, and is likely more robust than the FT1700 (and FT3000), and it rates very highly in reviews, etc. It has lotsa fans. But the FT1700 is made well enough and is stout enough for my purposes, and the above table bit changes are a God send, so it stays in the table the majority of the time. It really boils down to what’s important to you and what you’ll be doing. If you plan to do lots of raised panels several times a week, the MW is probably a better choice. If not, how much importance do you put on being able to change the bit from above the table using one hand?

Both of my Freud routers and the MW came with 1/2” collets….you might need to purchase a 1/4” collet separately for the MW, but the FT1700 came with both….either that or they sent me one because I have both.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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