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Inca 410 jointer/planer

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Forum topic by amagineer posted 06-07-2015 07:22 PM 1636 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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amagineer

1414 posts in 2057 days


06-07-2015 07:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question planer jointer

Someone is selling an Inca 410 jointer/planer for $500, and I was wondering if it is worth the price. If not what should I offer for this jointer/planer.

thanks for the help.
Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!


11 replies so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3390 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 06-07-2015 10:09 PM

Hello Don,

As the Inca is obselete I would not buy it regardless of the price, $500 is possibly a reasonable price but needs to be matched with the condition of the machine
In all honesty I would find out the new price then halve it and the add or reduce the price dependent on the condition it is in. For some reason users who lo longer want equipment just shove them awauy in the corner and fail to preserve the cast surfaces for long term storage, then photograph them in that condition expecting big dollars in the sale
If its showing lack of maintenance I would not touch it, if is in an OK condition ask for a demonstration, if they will not demonstrate it beware.

After market knives should be able to be supplied, replaced and sharpened from a Saw Service provider, nothing special there.

From memory its only a two blade head and not three as per the “average” thicknesser jointer runs

In Australia we have Jet Hafco Powermatic and generic rebadged brands (most come from the PRC anyway)

These machines pull big bucks new ( $2000 + ) and require their own 15A single phase or 3 Phase supply to operate.

If you arrange a demonstration visually check everything.
adjust all the wheels locks and slides (do not move the outfeed table) to check for a “moves OK feel” Have a look at the blades if the edges are shiny and in good condition physically, have a look at the cutting edges the cutting edge refelects light they are blunt and need honing/sharpening. Do not be too concerned as they are consumable anyway its just a condition check for making a decision.

Check if the user manual and accessory tool kit is with it

Lock it all up and check for coplaner beds between in feed and out feed.
Stand back and run the machine with no load, listen to it run, sound OK no noises or metalic sounds? good.
Switch off and let it run down listening for any unusual noises, vibrations, squealing, rubbing etc, all OK good.
Run a piece of YOUR timber through it. Look OK Good.

Then with your veriner calipers you have in your side pocket check for parallelism in thicknessing, sign of nicks in the finish, again nicks are cosmetic.

That will give you a good idea if you want to buy it.

Now also remember if something non consumable breaks you may have to get it fabricated due to unavalibility of spare parts. The most common breakage of critical parts from my experience is the cast fittings on the ramps under the tables and is caused by attempting to move the table when the locks are engaged.

Otherwise if it throws a belt or nicks a blade so what, (thats why you have spares)

Is that what you wanted to know?....you may already have one and know all this blah blah blah !!

-- Regards Robert

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2057 days


#2 posted 06-07-2015 11:39 PM

Robert; Thanks for the detailed info. I will look elsewhere for a jointer.

Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3390 posts in 1664 days


#3 posted 06-08-2015 01:24 AM

Yo Don,

I hope I didnt put you off.

I consider a jointer/planner has got to be one of the most accurate and precise machines in the workshop, as all timber work preparation generally starts here, regardless if you even only buy dressed timber.

Its a worthwile investment even if a big capital outlay, and needs to be handled with extreme care to ensure it maintains its accuracy.
Dont be surprised if you spend two hours setting it up after replacing the blades, that’s all part of the maintenance of a jointer for you. As It produces the datum line for all your ongoing work and hence your finished results are refelected in its accuracy.

I have looked at combined units but kept them separate mainly because of the jointers required accuracy, as opposed the replacing blades in a thicknesser with the accompanying gauge is no where as time comsuming.
My thicknesser is a fairly robust and portable unit where as my jointer would be a little more protected, I certainly would not transport it anywhere.

-- Regards Robert

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

686 posts in 1258 days


#4 posted 06-08-2015 04:21 AM

I agree with Rob,Jointers are my favorite piece of woodworking equptment if you can inspect the machine before you buy that a good thing.Look at the beds are they flat the fence should not be twisted ,Is it square on the infeed and out feed.A little off is okay 1/8 or 1/4 is too much.
I have heard inca machines are very precision, the beds are so short kinda defeats the purpose of having a jointer.Good luck be patient it too me over a year to find my machine.I almost settled for another import.

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amagineer

1414 posts in 2057 days


#5 posted 06-08-2015 11:58 AM

Robert; about 5 years ago I bought a 4” Delta/Rockwell jointer from the 1960’s and brought it back to life. I agree with the long blade setup time. Over the past month I have been getting a lot of vibration when using it, and after inspection I found the cast housing that hold’s the blade bearings is worn. That is why I was looking to replace it.
Thanks for your valuable info.

Don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3390 posts in 1664 days


#6 posted 06-09-2015 07:50 AM

Me again!

Don
You can use shiming material in/on the bearing surface and remove the play to correct the problem, if the machine is a good asset in the workshop and worth saving.

-- Regards Robert

View tomlokken's profile

tomlokken

1 post in 333 days


#7 posted 01-04-2016 04:41 PM

Don, In my humble opinion the machine is NOT obsolete. It has a wide jointer bed and the planing head will accommodate lumber likely to be used in a hobby shop – that is if your not making timber frame houses or kitchen cabinets. I had a 410, sold it with the idea I needed something bigger. So I bought a Robland Jointer/ planer.
I looked all over creation for a 410 with the idea of selling the big machine. Reason: shop space and my inclination to stick to Krenov-sized work. Now I am looking for an Inca 9” bandsaw. Best of Luck
Tom

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TheOtherMrRogers

41 posts in 1641 days


#8 posted 01-04-2016 05:23 PM

OK, I’ll throw in my two cents.

Inca’s are cool, but a fit “fragile” feeling. They are not big beefy planing and jointing monsters. Guitar makers tend to really like the Inca jointer planers. Oh, and did I say that they were expensive?

I spend too much time on Craigslist / Ebay, and separate jointers and planers can be found. People often think that they have a really valuable machine. Be patient. Call People and talk them down.

A few years ago, I purchased a new condition lunchbox planer for $100, and upgraded to a Shopsmith (no laughing, the planer is quite good) for $100. I bought a vintage Powermatic 6 inch jointer for $153, and upgraded the motor for $40. A friend of mine bought a used 8 inch jointer for $300.

I checked CL just now, and a lunchbox planer can be had for $100, and a good 6 inch jointer for mid $200. I would go for those.

My 2 Cents

-- For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2176 posts in 1485 days


#9 posted 01-06-2016 02:55 AM

I wish people would stop saying “jointer planer” when they mean jointer. I think Sears started this usage, probably in order to mislead buyers into thinking they were getting a thickness planer. You see this in CL ads all the time.

Having said that, Inca did make a combination machine that had both functions. So which is this one? Jointer? or Jointer planer combo?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View amagineer's profile

amagineer

1414 posts in 2057 days


#10 posted 01-06-2016 12:43 PM

runswithscissors- I agree with you; I grew up calling a jointer a jointer and a planer a planer. When I posted this I just copied the CL ad which I could not tell which one it was. I will not be able to answer your question which one it was, because I posted this back June 06, 2015 and the ad is long gone.

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

View TheOtherMrRogers's profile

TheOtherMrRogers

41 posts in 1641 days


#11 posted 01-19-2016 03:51 PM

Sorry to jump in a little late.

Here is some info:
Jointer – American term for tool that flattens wood on one side.
Planer – American term for tool that creates even thickness
Planer – English term for tool that flattens wood on one side (see Jointer, above)
Thicknesser – English term for tool that creates even thickness (see Planer, above).

So, we are really screwed up.

It is my belief that Craftsman marketed Jointers as “Jointer Planers” because of the Canadian Market, but I’m not completely sure. So, on craigslist, you might see something like: “For Sale 6” Jointer Planer – Used Once”

But, there are lots of Planer-Jointer or Jointer-Planers that are combination machines. These are not always called “combo”s.

Inca makes them, but many European manufactures have made, or do make them. Hammer, Makita, Hitachi, Robland, Lurem, etc.

There is a real following for the Makita 2030 and Hitachi F-1000-A combo units.

https://books.google.com/books?id=v_YDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA37&dq=american+woodworker+inca+jointer&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi8sJTOnLbKAhUCymMKHbtvAbwQ6AEIMDAA#v=onepage&q=american%20woodworker%20inca%20jointer&f=false

Good luc

-- For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?

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