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Forum topic by Don Butler posted 09-11-2009 02:50 PM 1101 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Don Butler

1086 posts in 2858 days


09-11-2009 02:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip

Whenever I start to build cabinets or anything large and heavy I have to consider how to deal with it as it grows and gets heavier and more ungainly as work progresses.

I’m forced to think about my ability to move such projects. I am 76 years old and not able to do heavy lifting.
I MUST move the projects because everything, tools and projects, must be moved back to allow garaging of our car.
The shop is only 20×28. I have enough machinery that the place is a little crowded even without a large project.
So here’s how I deal with the issue.
I start with the base of the project, working from the bottom up. Before going to a point where it gets too heavy to turn over, I install heavy duty casters on the bottom. Putting it back upright, the rest of the assembly is built. Every night, after a day’s work, I roll everything back to the side and in the back corner and bring the famly car in.

Best regards,
d

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.


9 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3175 days


#1 posted 06-29-2010 05:14 AM

Planning ahead is probably a good idea no matter how old you are. You probably waste a lot less effort because you consider the cost of moving that project each time its moved.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2446 days


#2 posted 07-01-2010 04:57 PM

Your right large projects in the shop can be awkward to handle and starting with the base is the best plan of attack in a one man shop. For large projects that don’t have casters on them I have a homemade furniture dolly I built that has a solid base to use to keep the piece on to move it around until its done. I even do the finish on it and it makes it nice to rotate it while applying finish. With the new shop being much smaller now I have found myself eyeing on of those rolling lift carts that have a 500 lbs lift capacity.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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Don Butler

1086 posts in 2858 days


#3 posted 07-01-2010 05:58 PM

I was in Harbor freight a while ago and they had a sale price on their little furniture cart. It’s small, about the size you’d want under a corner cab or something, but the wheels are nice. It’s built with a sturdy oak frame.
I figure the next time I do a large project I’ll enlarge the cart so it’s big enough for the project. Probably just make a bigger frame and put the wheels on it.
The original HF frame will go in my lumber storage room so I can use it for smaller projects.

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#4 posted 07-01-2010 06:16 PM

Hey Don
What I use is a hydraulic cart that pumps up and down . I extended the top by adding a wood frame to the top. I bought it at a local auto parts place For $99 but I think HF sells them also. It sure makes things easier for one guy to move heavy cabinets by himself.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Don Butler

1086 posts in 2858 days


#5 posted 07-01-2010 06:28 PM

Jim,
That sounds like I should look into it.
Thanks for the tip.

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 3355 days


#6 posted 07-01-2010 06:30 PM

I’ve had a few times where I assembled a large cabinet on my assembly table and then couldn’t get it off by myself because of the weight. It can also be a nightmare trying to get large projects into a customer’s home sometimes, especially when going up stairs.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

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Don Butler

1086 posts in 2858 days


#7 posted 07-01-2010 06:32 PM

That’s when I hope I’ve been good enough to cultivate some young, strong friends!!

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2578 days


#8 posted 07-01-2010 06:46 PM

good one Don having young muscles around solve many things….....LOL

Jim that hydralic chart how does it look (I canĀ“t see it for my eyes sorry )

Dennis

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2858 days


#9 posted 07-01-2010 06:59 PM


I’m not sure this is the same article, though.

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

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