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Forum topic by Jim Crockett (USN Retired) posted 09-11-2009 03:46 AM 897 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim Crockett (USN Retired)

852 posts in 3198 days


09-11-2009 03:46 AM

I’m curious – I was looking at some hardwood on a website and noticed that 8/4 thickness costs more per board foot than 4/4. This doesn’t make sense to me – the way I understand the board foot formula, I would already be paying for the additional thickness in the calculation for number of board feet [(width x length x thickness) / 144].

I have probably noticed this before but hadn’t really given it much thought because I seldom purchase by the bf (no hardwood lumber stores anywhere near me). If the prices were per square foot, I would understand the difference in price but would expect more than the $0.75 that I saw.

It doesn’t cost more to cut the wood to 8/4 vs 4/4 – I would expect less labor cost for the thicker board.

Some enlightenment, please.

Jim

-- A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including his/her life".


11 replies so far

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GMman

3902 posts in 3162 days


#1 posted 09-11-2009 03:52 AM

Jim.. the way I see it in a log which are not as big as they use to be they get more 4/4 boards than 8/4 that would make the difference in the price.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#2 posted 09-11-2009 03:53 AM

Jim 8/4 sells for more because it takes long for it to dry and has to be stored longer and because they can get it (a higher price)

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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scrappy

3506 posts in 2895 days


#3 posted 09-11-2009 03:57 AM

Some woods are harder to get in the thicker boards. You have to take into consideration, it is harder to get a good GRADE of lumber (clear, no knots or cracks) in the thicker boards. Most of your thicker stock will be a lower grade. So for the same grade, you pay more.

Also you have to look to suply and demand. Just like at home depot, a 4×4 cost more then twice as much as a 2×4. It is twice the wood but costs more. They sell a LOT more 2×4’s then 4×4’s.

It is the same for length. You can buy cut-offs for a lot less then regular lumber. If you are doing small projects you can save a lot, buy purchaseing shorter boards.

Hope this helps.

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

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GMman

3902 posts in 3162 days


#4 posted 09-11-2009 04:04 AM

Jim..Scrappy and I are pretty well saying the same thing.

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

618 posts in 2829 days


#5 posted 09-11-2009 04:07 AM

8/4 lumber is generally the better material from better logs. (no one is cutting low grade 8/4) It takes a bigger log to cut a piece of nice 8/4. Bigger nice logs cost more Money. A sawmill may cut 20,000 bf of 4/4 and wend up with 5000 bf of 8/4. the price difference is based on this and availability. 8/4 Red Oak is easier to come by (they grow bigger, faster) than say Hard Maple.
The price difference in Red Oak 4/4 to 8/4 may be $1.00/bf but from 4/4 to 8/4 in Purple Heart It may be $5.00/bf. Availability/Specie/Supply & Demand. Hope this helps.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

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poroskywood

618 posts in 2829 days


#6 posted 09-11-2009 04:09 AM

I thought I was going to be first to answer this question. I also agree with all the fast typers.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

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SuperDave02

138 posts in 2696 days


#7 posted 09-11-2009 04:13 AM

Ive always wondered about that myself too, Those answers do make sense.

I once thought it was more expensive because the saw mills needed to hire bigger guys to muscle those 8/4’s around.

-- David South FLorida http://rockingrrustics.blogspot.com/

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 3162 days


#8 posted 09-11-2009 04:14 AM

Example…I was at a large mill the other day (soft wood) and the logs were so small that all you could see coming out was 2×4 and narow boards once in a while a 2×6 came out.

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GMman

3902 posts in 3162 days


#9 posted 09-11-2009 04:17 AM

Superdave..you comic guys are all the same lol lol

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Jim Crockett (USN Retired)

852 posts in 3198 days


#10 posted 09-11-2009 04:54 AM

Well, now I know. I was sure there was a good reason for this and you never learn unless you ask.

Thanks for the responses!

Jim

-- A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including his/her life".

View bandman's profile

bandman

79 posts in 2855 days


#11 posted 09-27-2009 05:10 AM

I agree with the A1Jim above. 8/4 material takes significantly more time to dry in a dehumidification
kiln which does equate to some extra expense for electricity and more importantly ties up kiln time
you could be drying something else. He’s also correct in saying most places charge more for 8/4
material because they can and people pay it. With my minimill operation, I don’t upcharge for
thicker material. I have several clients that come to me for quartersawn 8/4 and thicker red and
white oak on a fairly regular basis.

Hope this helps.

-- Phil

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