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can you identify this antique logging tool?

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Forum topic by DonG posted 06-07-2015 06:02 PM 1135 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DonG

5 posts in 545 days


06-07-2015 06:02 PM

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/npjr2f6.jpg!

A friend gave me this item because he knows I collect antique logging equipment but I am unable to identify it. Can you help me? Thanks DonG.


15 replies so far

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bold1

261 posts in 1307 days


#1 posted 06-08-2015 11:15 AM

I never saw an articulate one before, but the curved end is for peeling bark. To be used for tanning. Only name I’ve ever heard is a peeling spud.

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mtenterprises

933 posts in 2153 days


#2 posted 06-08-2015 12:18 PM

Barking spud

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1190 days


#3 posted 06-08-2015 01:41 PM

Yep, I saw one in use in Germany back in the mid 1900’s. They also had an axe like the one posted in another thread. Fell a tree, de-limb it, and then spud the bark. heheh Yep, that’s what they did. They did it in some sort of ritual. About 10 German men, in traditional Bavarian Leder Hosen would come into the woods where we were bivouacked, Two or 3 would swing axes to cut a particular tree. After it was down, another couple would start cutting limbs, then another 2 or three would strip the bark off the tree with a tool like that. About a week later, they would come back in and retrieve the tree. Carried it out by hand back to the village to use for some mysterious thing. Never did find out what the stripped tree was used for.
And yep, I suppose you could use it on your neighbors dog, but don’t have any witnesses…......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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DonG

5 posts in 545 days


#4 posted 06-08-2015 02:29 PM

My first thought was a barking spud but since I put the WD40 on it and got it moving I don t think so anymore. First it folds when you go to use it as a bark spud and secondly its not sharp. The writing on it says ‘Patented July 1907’.
Any other thoughts?
DonG

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#5 posted 06-08-2015 02:33 PM

A hoe. For a very small garden.

I really dont know. Have a patent number?

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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bold1

261 posts in 1307 days


#6 posted 06-09-2015 12:48 PM

If you have a patent number you should be able to look it up here http://www.datamp.org/
It’s the Directory of American Tool and Machinery Patents.

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DonG

5 posts in 545 days


#7 posted 06-09-2015 02:06 PM

No patent number. Just the words ’ Patented July1907’.

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#8 posted 06-09-2015 02:13 PM

does it look like the heal has hammer marks on it?

EDIT: I thought for a minute it may be something a cobbler would use in shoes but I dont think so because the bottom is a rib and not wide which would possibly deform the sole of the shoe.

It isnt sharp. I am not sure but am interested.

EDIT II: maybe something for the railroad?

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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bold1

261 posts in 1307 days


#9 posted 06-09-2015 03:41 PM

SirIrb, I believe you are on to something!. How about a box car mover/ pry bar?

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#10 posted 06-09-2015 04:56 PM

I was thinking about something to move rails or cross ties into position so they can be spiked.


SirIrb, I believe you are on to something!. How about a box car mover/ pry bar?

- bold1


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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bold1

261 posts in 1307 days


#11 posted 06-09-2015 05:35 PM

http:www.ebay.com/itm/antique-railroad-car-mover-pry-bar-patented-july-16-1907-/111651107898

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bandit571

14536 posts in 2143 days


#12 posted 06-09-2015 05:39 PM

Have moved a few rail cars with a Hand Jack. Didn’t look like that one. Mine had a skate/shoe that slid under the wheel, then you just push down on the LONG handle. And, hope the car didn’t roll back on it. makes the handle fly up in your face….DAMHIKT….

Unless it was for using on the side of the “trucks” instead of inline?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#13 posted 06-09-2015 05:54 PM

Did I win? Thats what the link showed, right?

I have never won anything.

What is a rail road tool, Alex?


http:www.ebay.com/itm/antique-railroad-car-mover-pry-bar-patented-july-16-1907-/111651107898

- bold1


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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DonG

5 posts in 545 days


#14 posted 06-09-2015 06:19 PM

Yes you WON Sirlrib!!!!!
Thanks to all who took the time to have a look and take a guess.
I was given it by a friend who knew I collected old logging equipment but neither he nor I had any idea what it was used for.
I now intend to pass it on to a frien who collects train memorabilia.
Again thanks everyone!
Don

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bold1

261 posts in 1307 days


#15 posted 06-09-2015 08:05 PM

DonG, It could indeed be a logging tool. Up until the roads were improved and heavy trucks were made large tracts were timbered by railroad. Many of those large lumber companies owned and maintained their own locos and cars and had track crews laying rail.

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