LumberJocks

Another electrical cleanup question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by gthomson posted 06-07-2015 08:35 AM 737 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View gthomson's profile

gthomson

15 posts in 589 days


06-07-2015 08:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: electric 240 110

I have an old Delta table saw from my grandfather that I think had a 240 twist plug on it like pictured here – http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/240v_breaker_2.htm

I rented a workshop for about 5-6 years to do Corian type work, but it didn’t have 240.
So I put a plug on it that would work with 110.
This was it – http://www.gthomson.us/projects/deltasaw/deltaus-plug.jpg
It worked.

I’ve since moved to a new house, and no longer have that workshop or Corian business.

My house is supposedly wired for 240 in some ways, with this as an outlet in the garage for the previous owner’s RV – http://www.gthomson.us/projects/deltasaw/240-rv.jpg

That doesn’t match the twist 240 plug that was on the table saw plug previously.

if I have 240 options available, should I use that for the Delta table saw?
It has worked fine for many years plugged in to 110.
Is the twist 240 plug that used to be on that table saw different in some way from the non-twist plug on my wall now?

What are the benefits to switching the table saw plug back to a 240 plug and getting it into that 240 recepticle instead?

-- Techie by trade, tinkerer at heart


9 replies so far

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


#1 posted 06-07-2015 12:49 PM

If you are ok running at 110 then it won’t hurt. The 240 will allow for a lower amp draw and run a bit cooler due to that. Those old saws are beasts and run great. It is great you now have a 240 option. Look at the breaker value if it was for an rv it could be a 30 or 50 amp. Remember to always match breaker,wire gauge,outlet, plug, and device cord to required minimum.

An example. Would be 30a breaker 10awg wire & device cord 30 amp rated outlet/receptacle

Tools running at 240 is better in the long run for your tools. It will not be cheaper but you will pull the power from both power buses spreading the load and keeps the heat down on that motor.

Send me a pm with email address and I’ll send you a great article that is titled “why 240 is better” puts in great simple terms.

Take care.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2437 days


#2 posted 06-07-2015 12:55 PM

The RV outlet you show is a 120V, 30amp. It is not a 240 volt.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 638 days


#3 posted 06-07-2015 12:59 PM

Any tool that I can wire for and run on 220/240V I will do so.

If possible I will run 10 gauge (max 30 amp) wire and receptacles. I may choose to use a 20A breaker but I know that the wire will always be capable of handling 30A if necessary. Also the wire will run cooler.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

121 posts in 1554 days


#4 posted 06-07-2015 04:06 PM

There are such things as twist-lock 120V outlets. It seems like the motor would have to be wired for 120V if all you did was replace the plug and didn’t rewire the motor itself from 240V to 120V?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#5 posted 06-07-2015 04:16 PM

You can run it on whatever plug you want that’s capable of handling the amperage. But you pretty much want a plug that matches the voltage it’s hooked to.

Twist lock or straight blade doesn’t matter.

If 120 works for you I’d say don’t fix it if it ain’t broke. But 240v has some advantages.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View gthomson's profile

gthomson

15 posts in 589 days


#6 posted 06-07-2015 06:38 PM

Thanks everyone, I think I got what I needed to understand this one for now – at least enough to know what to look for and understand better…

In case it helps somebody else that happens across this -
Found this page on a refurb of a similar machine -
http://www.jimknapp.us/Unisaw.html
And it hit me like a brick wall – look first for the plate attached that has the specs of the motor on it.
Found that…
And from that, it looks like it can do either voltage, but the wiring is different depending on which is used.
I don’t see a way I can get in to see how it’s wired without taking the motor apart, which is beyond me for now.
But in the process it got me deeper into the bowels of this beast :-) and understanding it a little better.

This page helped me find out that it’s a 1955 machine – http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/DeltaSerialNumbers.ashx

The belts are long past overdue for a replacement.

And just an uneducated guess after taking off the two plates and looking inside – it’s probably in need of a motor cleanup by somebody that knows motors well.

Tried measuring the voltage of a regular receptacle, using my new multimeter and this page – http://www.acmehowto.com/electrical/outletvoltage.php, before testing the RV receptacle – that didn’t go well. More googling before I try that again…

Motor plate -

-- Techie by trade, tinkerer at heart

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1536 days


#7 posted 06-07-2015 08:28 PM

the only advantage to running 220 over 110 is the size of the wire LEADING to the appliance.once there the windings are in parallel or in series depending on voltage and see the same amperage, load and heat. Since the current draw For example 10 amps for 110 and 5 amps for 220 the cost is the same. The cost of the components to start from the box are usually about the same when weighed against each other as well. Run the saw on what is convenient. One consideration is the length of the cord from the outlet to the saw, or if you plan to ever use an extension cord. 110 outlets are every where 220 outlets …not so prevalent.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#8 posted 06-07-2015 10:09 PM

... it looks like it can do either voltage, but the wiring is different depending on which is used.
I don t see a way I can get in to see how it s wired without taking the motor apart, which is beyond me for now.
[...]
Tried measuring the voltage of a regular receptacle, using my new multimeter … that didn’t go well.

Leave it alone. If it’s worked fine on 120v all this time, just go with it. Wiring for 240v is not difficult, but will involve rewiring the jumpers in the electrical junction box on the motor, and replacing the plug. If you are having trouble measuring the voltage of an outlet, then messing with the wiring on the motor is probably not a good idea :)

Spend the money on new belts instead!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#9 posted 06-07-2015 10:13 PM

What he said

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com