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Forum topic by Jerry posted 06-05-2015 07:38 PM 1038 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

1767 posts in 1109 days


06-05-2015 07:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question veneer double edge trimmer refurbishing

Edit in progress

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/


9 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#1 posted 06-05-2015 08:11 PM

Generally you will always apply the top first, and the edging last. Is this an existing table you are redoing, or new construction?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Jerry

1767 posts in 1109 days


#2 posted 06-05-2015 08:19 PM


Generally you will always apply the top first, and the edging last. Is this an existing table you are redoing, or new construction?

- Fred Hargis

Thank you Fred, this is an antique Duncan Fife dining room table. It was purchased with missing leaves, so I’ve been commissioned to make two new leaves. The top is damaged beyond repair, so after I finish with the leaf fabrication, I will be re-veneering the entire table including the leaves all at once with one continuous 4’ x 8’sheet of Mahogany veneer. I’m not redoing the edge banding on the table, I will only be applying edge banding to the leaves. Based on what you said, I could be getting myself into a spot of trouble. What do you think?

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 903 days


#3 posted 06-05-2015 09:40 PM



Generally you will always apply the top first, and the edging last. – Fred Hargis

Well, like they say, “It takes all kinds…” . I like to put the edging on first. To my mind, it keeps the seam between top and edge more out of harm’s way.

Also, I would separate the halves of the double-edge trimmer and trim one edge at a time. Works better for me.

View ScottM1's profile

ScottM1

126 posts in 1044 days


#4 posted 06-05-2015 10:05 PM

Defiantly do the top last. This way the seam is less visible. If you use the double edge trimmer be sure to test it on a sample first and make any adjustments needed. Sometimes the factory setting may gouge into the sub straight.

-- Scott Marshburn,https://www.youtube.com/user/ecabinetstips, FaceBook, https://www.facebook.com/ecabinetstipsandtricks, Twitter, https://twitter.com/eCabinetstips

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 684 days


#5 posted 06-05-2015 10:50 PM

Same here edging 1st then banding, main reason is shedding liquid. Top 1st then band leaves a horizontal seam on a flat surface for water to seep into. 2nd, seem isn’t as conspicuous on the side as on top.

-- I meant to do that!

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Jerry

1767 posts in 1109 days


#6 posted 06-05-2015 10:58 PM

Also, I would separate the halves of the double-edge trimmer and trim one edge at a time. Works better for me.

- jerryminer

Thanks Jerry for your input. So far you seem to be outnumbered on the order of application, but I really appreciate your input and the suggestion to separate the halves of the double-edge trimmer and trim one edge at a time is a good thing to think on…

Thanks,
The other Jerry

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

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Jerry

1767 posts in 1109 days


#7 posted 06-05-2015 11:03 PM


Defiantly do the top last. This way the seam is less visible. If you use the double edge trimmer be sure to test it on a sample first and make any adjustments needed. Sometimes the factory setting may gouge into the sub straight.

- ScottM1

I had to smile at your typo, it was great!!! The faster we type the more likely we are to do a really great typo like the one you did.

So now I am instructed to sally forth Defiantly and Fearlessly and Majestically and do the top last :p

Then I will Wholeheartedly and with great Vigor test the trimmer on a sample.

Thank you my good man, and

May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.

Jerry

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

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Jerry

1767 posts in 1109 days


#8 posted 06-05-2015 11:04 PM



Same here edging 1st then banding, main reason is shedding liquid. Top 1st then band leaves a horizontal seam on a flat surface for water to seep into. 2nd, seem isn t as conspicuous on the side as on top.

- Ghidrah

This is very insightful Gidrah, I’d not thought about these issues at all. Thanks for bringing them to light.

—Jerry

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 594 days


#9 posted 06-05-2015 11:21 PM

Personally I don’t use the hand trimmers, they have the tendency to split/crack the veneer.
I would rout the excess and then block sand them flat with a sanding block.
Edge first then the top,
Besides, if your not doing the edges of the table and only doing the edges of the leaves then you would want the leaves to be the same as the table which would be the top last.
I would also suggest you use wood on wood veneer, not the 10 mill paper backed.
Glad I could help!

-- -

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