Help Id reclaimed timber please.

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Forum topic by AESamuel posted 06-04-2015 02:47 PM 1081 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View AESamuel's profile


75 posts in 1157 days

06-04-2015 02:47 PM

Hi there,

I bought two 3”x8”x12’ planks from a builder a little while ago and am planning to make some end tables with them but I’d like to know a bit more about the wood itself. It looks a lot like a type of pine, but is stronger than white pine from a box store. Doing a fingernail test I can only just make a mark in the wood and it seems to be around the same as maple in terms of hand planing difficulty.

Have attached pictures, any help would be much appreciated!


14 replies so far

View JuniorJoiner's profile


484 posts in 3375 days

#1 posted 06-04-2015 02:55 PM

douglas fir

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

View shipwright's profile


7939 posts in 2733 days

#2 posted 06-04-2015 03:02 PM

+1 on D. Fir. (Aka Oregon Pine)
The pitch seam is a dead give away.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees.

View johnstoneb's profile


2819 posts in 2107 days

#3 posted 06-04-2015 03:17 PM

+2 Douglas fir looks like quartersawn

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View JayT's profile


5553 posts in 2146 days

#4 posted 06-04-2015 03:48 PM

+3 on Doug Fir. Nice tight grain, too.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View BurlyBob's profile


5308 posts in 2200 days

#5 posted 06-04-2015 05:14 PM

+4 Doug Fir. From what you show CVG-clear vertical grain.

View AESamuel's profile


75 posts in 1157 days

#6 posted 06-04-2015 05:20 PM

That’s great, thanks a lot everyone!

View Yonak's profile


986 posts in 1456 days

#7 posted 06-04-2015 06:45 PM

+2 Douglas fir looks like quartersawn

- johnstoneb

I guess I don’t understand the term “quartersawn”. The sample is nearly a square with rings at about 45°. What characterizes it as quartersawn ?

View Aj2's profile


1310 posts in 1733 days

#8 posted 06-04-2015 10:47 PM

Looks more like rift sawn since the lines are corner to corner.Rift sawn makes good table legs.

-- Aj

View Luthierman's profile


203 posts in 1022 days

#9 posted 06-04-2015 11:11 PM

Without a doubt that is fir. I would make classical guitar neck blanks and braces out of that if i had it. Beautifully tight grain there.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View gfadvm's profile


14940 posts in 2625 days

#10 posted 06-05-2015 12:41 AM

Looks like rift sawn Doug Fir from here.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View WDHLT15's profile


1726 posts in 2411 days

#11 posted 06-05-2015 02:11 AM

I am going to line up in the Douglas Fir Camp.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln.

View firefighterontheside's profile


17776 posts in 1791 days

#12 posted 06-05-2015 03:10 AM

My first thought was hemlock, but I seem to be outnumbered. Doug fir is more likely.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View TheFridge's profile


9100 posts in 1421 days

#13 posted 06-05-2015 03:15 AM

Quarter sawn has the grain running parallel or perpendicular to the top and sides. Or close to it. Rift is at a 45 or close.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View splatman's profile


586 posts in 1334 days

#14 posted 06-07-2015 03:29 AM

I’m no stranger to that old slow-grown Doug Fir wood. I source it almost exclusively from demolition and remodels (check the dumpsters). In the sample pictured above, the corner closest to the bottom of the pic, has to be 100+ years older than the corner near the top.

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