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Permanently attaching a washer to a nut/bolt.

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Forum topic by RobinDobbie posted 06-03-2015 11:42 PM 1406 views 0 times favorited 42 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


06-03-2015 11:42 PM

I’m needing to attach a number of washers to some nuts with some strength. The washers will have squared sides and will be taking some twisting force to hold some threaded rod while I tighten a nut down. The strength doesn’t need to be insane, but if I’m using a 12” crescent wrench, I would want to apply about 10 – 20 lbs pressure. I have 6-minute epoxy and loctite blue. Another way I could go is to sandwich the washer between two nuts. I’m thinking the best way to go would be the sandwich method with loctite, but I thought I’d ask and see what the consensus here was.


42 replies so far

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#1 posted 06-03-2015 11:53 PM

If the washer isn’t required to spin free or lock, why not buy nuts with the washers already attached?

-- I meant to do that!

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#2 posted 06-04-2015 12:29 AM

Because they need to be big washers. I just came back in from fiddling, and I think the sandwich method will work, if the loctite blue will hold them. Let me get a pic up.

The washer down in the unistrut needs to contact the sides so it doesn’t move. Then I can loosen the top nut to allow for moving the rod to the desired position and locking it down, again. So the bottom two nuts will have loctite, and the washer too, I guess. Sucks because I have to shave 7 more nuts(the nut that goes in the middle) so that the top washer will contact the unistrut. Really annoying because my grinding wheel is clogged and it’s going to take some time.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#3 posted 06-04-2015 12:44 AM

Bigger washer and grind sides flat that are parallel to the unistrut and the contact will keep them from rotating.

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#4 posted 06-04-2015 12:47 AM

Yup, already did that. The bottom washer actually has 3 flat sides and is perfect. The top washer only has 1 flat side because it’s going to be very close to another washer and it was interfering. The question I have is how to keep the bottom washer(down in the unistrut) from twisting in relation to the rod. I guess I didn’t word that very well.

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Rayne

470 posts in 999 days


#5 posted 06-04-2015 12:50 AM

Why don’t you use a flat steel bar, drill the necessary holes, then cut them to size with your grinder using a cut-off wheel. Then use a lock nut on the bottom, maybe a spacer in the middle (or many multiple washers that’ll fill up that space), and finally a wing nut on the top to make it easy to loosen up?

flat bar like this, but there may be better options at the store.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_44138-37672-11662___?productId=3033551&pl=1&Ntt=flat+steel+bar

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#6 posted 06-04-2015 12:54 AM

That would have been a better option, but it’s really not needed, now. I would still need to find away to secure the rod to it so the rod doesn’t twist when I tighten the top nut.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#7 posted 06-04-2015 12:55 AM

Sorry, guess I’m not understanding what you mean by twisting. I was thinking you didn’t want the washer to spin/rotate about the threaded rod.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#8 posted 06-04-2015 12:57 AM

OK…dummy me, I see now you don’t want the ROD to twist, not the washer.

Can you put two nuts with lock washer between them above the top nut until you have it in place and tightened? Then, use two wrenches to loosen the two top nuts and remove them.

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Rayne

470 posts in 999 days


#9 posted 06-04-2015 12:59 AM

Just epoxy the bottom nut, washer, and rod together and that will solve your problem. When the rod wants to twist, it’s going to use the bottom washer to keep it in place. Everything else can remain as-is without issues from how I’m understanding your situation now.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#10 posted 06-04-2015 01:02 AM

Several thoughts: looks to me like some bar stock the correct width with hole drilled for the bolt would be easier than grinding those washers. As far as securing it, I would use my Mig welder: quick and permanent! (and welding would eliminate the need for the ‘ground down’ nuts)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#11 posted 06-04-2015 01:04 AM

No, I’m the dummy for not explaining what I want to do very well. Sorry.

The rod will need to move and be adjusted every time I use this jig, so I just need the bottom two nuts impossibly tight. The top nut only needs to be somewhat tight between adjustments.

Ok, I just read a forum somewhere that described the strength of Loctite blue as the following: “breaking force for Loctite 242 Blue after 24-hours cured is 70-150 inch-lbs (12 ft-lbs)”

So if my wrench is 12” long and I apply 10lbs of force, is that 10 ft. lbs? If so then I think the loctite will work. I’ll just have to make sure I don’t get too crazy tightening the top nut.

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#12 posted 06-04-2015 01:05 AM



Just epoxy the bottom nut, washer, and rod together and that will solve your problem. When the rod wants to twist, it s going to use the bottom washer to keep it in place. Everything else can remain as-is without issues from how I m understanding your situation now.

- Rayne

So you think the epoxy would be stronger than loctite? If so I’ll go with epoxy.

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#13 posted 06-04-2015 01:06 AM


Several thoughts: looks to me like some bar stock the correct width with hole drilled for the bolt would be easier than grinding those washers. As far as securing it, I would use my Mig welder: quick and permanent! (and welding would eliminate the need for the ground down nuts)

- gfadvm

I just spent the last hour grinding down 16 washers, so that’s done. I sure would love a welder for the nuts, I just haven’t sprung for one, yet.

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Rayne

470 posts in 999 days


#14 posted 06-04-2015 01:10 AM

I used epoxy on a 2” long 3/4” bolt in a round hole to hold a router housing for my router lift. That hasn’t budged one bit. If you put epoxy in the thread of the bottom bolt and on top and under the bottom washer for coverage, it’s not going anywhere. Of course welding would hold it a heck of a lot better if you have one.

3rd photo shows the nut in a round hole; there’s always vertical pressure on the nut against the plywood.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/103597

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1195 days


#15 posted 06-04-2015 01:13 AM

Alright. Ima give it shot with epoxy.

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