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Air Filtration? Or just open the doors?

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Forum topic by BroncoBrian posted 06-03-2015 03:16 AM 1031 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


06-03-2015 03:16 AM

Curious if anyone has used the PM1200 Air filter and can say if it really makes a difference. I assume the coating of dust after two days is not avoidable but if it will be a lot better I might want this for that reason.

I have a large 3-car garage that becomes a shop for a week at a time. Am I just as well opening the doors for 3 minutes or will this do better. The issue I have with the doors is that the breeze seems to come into the garage space.

Suggestions? Anyone have anything positive to add to this/

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me


26 replies so far

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 945 days


#1 posted 06-03-2015 11:49 AM

Bronco-

I think air filtration units are designed for climate controlled shops, or a shop that is sealed, like in the winter.

So, I think it ultimately depends on whether you have a climate controlled shop and that depends the climate where you live.

For example, my shop is in a converted horse barn and decent size but unfortunately I couldn’t have as many windows as I would like. I have 8’ sliding doors which stay open except when it gets cold.

I live in NE FL and for most of the year my shop doors are open. When its warm you absolutely have to have some air circulation. So for me (and I suspect alot of guys) an air filtration unit is kind of useless.

BTW, I would LOVE to have the breeze come into my shop, but prevailing winds are usually blowing the opposite way ;-) Perhaps you could elaborate on the problem you have with a breeze blowing into the shop.

I have big pedestal fan blowing into the shop and a big drum fan at the other end blowing out.
I do not have a big dust problem and only use a respirator when working with stuff I’m worried about, like Chinese plywood and MDF (which I refuse to use anymore).

How do I dust my shop? I put the exhaust fan on high, put on my respirator, and blow everything off with compressed air. With the fans running, the air is cleared in a matter of a couple minutes.

When the deerfly season started, I built a set of screen panels for the big door. If your issue is things blowing in or insect annoyances, perhaps this would work for you.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1978 days


#2 posted 06-03-2015 11:58 AM

I am in about the same exact position as Robert, save that I use a one car garage with a full door at one end. I use 20” floor fans with the legs removed, hanging in the air with one facing in and one facing out. I have dust collectors up there also, two Grizzlies. If I run them, they get full, fans off or fans on.

I also clean my shop by turning on the fans, putting on the respirator, and using compressed air blowing it all out onto my wife’s car…

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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bbrown

173 posts in 3016 days


#3 posted 06-03-2015 02:01 PM

I open a door to the outside and put a fan at the top of the basement steps leading down in to my shop. I also put a fan right at the open door to the outside. This draws air from the house and creates a current that takes most of the dust right out the door. I do this when using my planer mainly. Not perfect but it works pretty well. Total cost = $25 for 2 thrift shop fans.

-- Forest, Virginia ; Micah 6:8

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Fred Hargis

3940 posts in 1957 days


#4 posted 06-03-2015 02:04 PM

If I was making the choice, I’d go with the open doors first. If that seemed to be inadequate, then consider an ambient air cleaner.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


#5 posted 06-03-2015 06:59 PM

Great feedback.

Robert – the issues is that dust blows back into the garage when the wind blows, to blowing it out (blower normally) can be tricky, though normally it is fine. I guess I have not done too much at the cold extreme temps and I do have to brag about being in Colorado, no bugs, no humidity, garage stay 50 – 80 degrees and generally very comfortable.

I was curious b/c there are times when cold or raining (hailing) that I would keep the doors down and work with an air system running. Just was not sure how much it would benefit that fine layer that coats everything.

I have a good DC system, a bunch of festool stuff for the dirty jobs, and great tools with good dust collection so the mess on the floor is minimal.

Sounds like opening the door to get the air cleaned out is safe enough not to require an air system on the ceiling?

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1815 days


#6 posted 06-03-2015 07:39 PM

Opening the doors just stirs up dust and recirculates it. The air filter will trap it.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#7 posted 06-03-2015 09:03 PM

I have the delta Ambient air cleaner (50-875)... and while it does collect some dust, I find it pretty useless.

Reason _ It is ceiling mounted and centered in the shop.

It does not generated enough circulation to pull the dust through it. Collection at the source e.g. vacuum on your palm sander is more reliable than trying to get the box to pull the suspended dust out of the air before you have a lung full.
I do still run the cleaner…. I am just not convinced it is really doing much but making more noise.

It will “Eventually” clear the air, but it isn’t protecting my lungs very well… so I went to a downdraft table for sanding to trap at the source.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00405K5BU/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=1944687462&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0007D2DP0&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=113BB4V3F7EY7EGQFW6V

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1422 days


#8 posted 06-03-2015 09:15 PM

Dr Dirt

That is the first I have seen of that table. Seems like it would be very effective.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

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AZWoody

693 posts in 688 days


#9 posted 06-03-2015 09:48 PM



Dr Dirt

That is the first I have seen of that table. Seems like it would be very effective.

- BroncoBrian

You can get the individual panels from Grizzly to make up your own downdraft table as well.
I built a very large one with a blower from an AC unit and used pegboard but had to really open up a lot of holes to get the airflow to max. Next project is to change out the pegboard for the Shop Fox panels for better grip of the wood being sanded.

With the table though, I can sand with no respirator or face mask and the dust goes straight down.

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 945 days


#10 posted 06-03-2015 09:51 PM



Opening the doors just stirs up dust and recirculates it. The air filter will trap it.

- bondogaposis

Not if you have an good big exhaust fan, Bondo ;-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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cutmantom

389 posts in 2499 days


#11 posted 06-03-2015 09:51 PM

A ceiling mounted air cleaner should be located of center shop it will create a circular air current in the room

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 945 days


#12 posted 06-03-2015 09:52 PM



I have the delta Ambient air cleaner (50-875)... and while it does collect some dust, I find it pretty useless.

Reason _ It is ceiling mounted and centered in the shop.


I’ve often wondered about this.

Why not put the fan on the floor under a table, for example?
Doesn’t dust always settle to the lowest point?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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firefighterontheside

13479 posts in 1320 days


#13 posted 06-03-2015 09:55 PM

I find my ceiling mounted filter does great. I can see the difference in the air minutes after turning it on.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1815 days


#14 posted 06-03-2015 11:07 PM

Why not put the fan on the floor under a table, for example?
Doesn’t dust always settle to the lowest point?

The dust that settles to the floor is not the dust that you are going to breath, it’s the finer, lighter dust that stays in the air, that is the dust that a filter will catch and you won’t have to breath. Sure it all settles eventually, but the finer particles which are the most harmful will stay air borne for a long time.

Not if you have an good big exhaust fan, Bondo ;-)

Yes, that works, except in the winter if you spend money to heat your shop.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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AZWoody

693 posts in 688 days


#15 posted 06-03-2015 11:10 PM



Why not put the fan on the floor under a table, for example?
Doesn’t dust always settle to the lowest point?

The dust that settles to the floor is not the dust that you are going to breath, it s the finer, lighter dust that stays in the air, that is the dust that a filter will catch and you won t have to breath. Sure it all settles eventually, but the finer particles which are the most harmful will stay air borne for a long time.

Not if you have an good big exhaust fan, Bondo ;-)

Yes, that works, except in the winter if you spend money to heat your shop.

- bondogaposis

Are there actual air filtration units that are rated at .5 micron or better? The ones I see usually are 1 micron at the smallest. That means, then problem particles are just being circulated around the shop and not actually collected.

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