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What to do with those scratch & dent motors from Grizzly?

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Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 06-02-2015 08:19 PM 859 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1124 days


06-02-2015 08:19 PM

In Grizzly’s “scratch & dent” room, there is always a pallet with 5-15 motors marked down quite a bit. Like, a $300 motor marked down to $75, or $200 to $50, that sort of thing. These have been tested and the testing results/specifics are noted.

Each time I see that, I wonder what the posibilities are. Is it feasible to use one to upgrade my Craftsman table saw motor, or replace the old 1/3hp motor in that 1952 Delta 14” Bandsaw? Maybe a custom sander, or even just something to spin around and keep me entertained while I’m waiting on the Performax.

Has anyone come up with any creative uses for extra motors?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com


7 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#1 posted 06-02-2015 08:23 PM

I would say it’s definitely feasible to upgrade. It just depends on the mount type, rpm’s and type of shaft. You could also make a grinder pretty easily.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#2 posted 06-02-2015 08:57 PM

Sure – why blow money on a cosmetically perfect motor? In the manuals for old equipment where the motor was optional they usually tell you what size pulley to use depending on motor speed – all that stuff is over on the vintage machinery website in the publications section. As mentioned, if you can make the mount work for you do it.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1124 days


#3 posted 06-02-2015 09:13 PM

Great news. I’m guessing that with the belt drive motors, there’s little or no risk of “too powerful” since if something gets caught up for some odd reason, the belt should slip (rather than direct drive where it could be securely connected to parts that might break under additional stress of a more powerful motor)

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#4 posted 06-02-2015 09:20 PM

Great news. I m guessing that with the belt drive motors, there s little or no risk of “too powerful” since if something gets caught up for some odd reason, the belt should slip (rather than direct drive where it could be securely connected to parts that might break under additional stress of a more powerful motor)

Not entirely true… many belt driven machines specify a maximum HP that should be used (and have lots of warnings about it in the manual). They are designed for a certain amount of force, and exceeding that can cause things to break – sometimes spectacularly. Don’t rely on ‘belt slip’ as a safety device – it isn’t.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1124 days


#5 posted 06-03-2015 01:44 AM



Great news. I m guessing that with the belt drive motors, there s little or no risk of “too powerful” since if something gets caught up for some odd reason, the belt should slip (rather than direct drive where it could be securely connected to parts that might break under additional stress of a more powerful motor)

Not entirely true… many belt driven machines specify a maximum HP that should be used (and have lots of warnings about it in the manual). They are designed for a certain amount of force, and exceeding that can cause things to break – sometimes spectacularly. Don t rely on belt slip as a safety device – it isn t.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Thanks for the warning/clarification. So, does this mean you’d think upgrading motors would not be a good idea?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#6 posted 06-03-2015 01:49 AM

Upgrading from 3/4 horse to 1 horse should be ok. Going from 3/4 to 5, probably not ok.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

460 posts in 712 days


#7 posted 06-03-2015 03:01 PM

The motor on my jointer is currently fine, but I was looking at replacement costs recently. The Grizzly scratch and dent prices make a day trip to Springfield look attractive. The manual for my jointer suggests that either a 1/2 or 3/4 hp motor is fine. The warning that comes into play is in regards to rpm, and it specifically says to use a motor that runs at 3450.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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