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Is this a problem with my plane?

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 06-02-2015 08:18 PM 939 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


06-02-2015 08:18 PM

Ok guys, another question as I’m working on my Stanley No. 65. This is not the best picture, but I think it shows you what is going on. If you look, on the left side of the plane there is more light showing above the iron. I had a previous post where I asked about squaring the iron. I did that and it has a nice straight edge now. I thought the fact that one side was longer might be the reason it cut deeper on that side. But now I see this and wonder if that is the real problem?

This plane has a ramp (frog?) built in to the casting. I lightly hit it with a file to see if there was a bur, but nothing obvious. Adding or reducing tension to the latch mechanism doesn’t seem to change anything. The bottom is nice and flat around the mouth, so I don’t think it has to do with the shape there.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


15 replies so far

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#1 posted 06-02-2015 09:49 PM

The idea is to use the skew (side to side) blade adjustment to get the blade edge parallel with the sole. Retract the blade until no cutting occurs, then extend it until you get shavings, adjust the blade skew to cut in the center, and adjust blade depth as required. Initially you want very thin shavings. It is trial and error at first, then you become more knowledgeable of how to set and adjust the blade. Once adjusting for very thin shavings, it doesn’t take much depth adjustment to increase the thickness. Try just nudging the depth adjust knob very little at a time.

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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


#2 posted 06-03-2015 01:14 AM

The blade is parallel to the opening in that picture. So am I understanding your method correctly that I’m supposed to start parallel, then skew until I get an even cut? Went out and tried this, with some minor success. With some skew (non parallelism) in the blade I can get an almost full width shaving, but the high (right) side still cuts light.

Previously, I had tried to get it to cut evenly on both sides of the blade by adjusting the skew, but never could get it to cut the same on both sides.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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BubbaIBA

383 posts in 1837 days


#3 posted 06-03-2015 02:02 AM

Look through the mouth to see if the bed is parallel to the mouth. It is not uncommon for the machining to be off and one side of the bed/mouth to be thicker than the other. If it is, I would junk the plane and take what you learned and use it on another rehab.

Many time when you find an older plane in basically good shape one of the reasons it appears to be little used is because it was junk to begin with and was not used.

Sorry but….This may give you a chance to start over with a #3 or #4 Stanley (I’m not a block plane fan). Depending on how “stand up guy” you are, with the clean up, you should be able to sell the block plane on eBay for enough to buy a nice type 9 to 13 Stanley #3 or #4 to put your new knowledge to work. Could be win win for you or you could do what I do with a junker…Use it as a paperweight at the office. Gives folks something to play with at work.

BTW, I had one with the same problem a couple of months ago. It had set on the shelf for several years because the first time I tried to use it was no bueno and I forgot about it. Recently I had some free time and it caught my eye, after several hours of fiddling I got around to inspecting the mouth/bed and sure nuf out of parallel….It’s a nice office toy now.

ken

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#4 posted 06-03-2015 12:01 PM

From what you’ve described, I think the frog or lever assembly is the problem.
I assume you’ve already checked the sliding mouth and sole for flatness, right?

The only think you can do is adjust the blade to make an even cut and go with it.

The newer Stanleys are not highly machined tools. After using them and then using a Lie Neilsen block plane, I really believe there is a reason to own a quality tool. Some of these old planes are really meant for the bottom of a carpenters bag. I know that’s a controversial statement, but I believe it. Every Stanley plane I’ve ever had was a continuous hassle trying to hold an adjustment.

I just picked up a pair of Wood River block planes on sale. No comparison between the two – the Stanley is a distant second. Like the one poster said, my old Stanley will probably become a paper weight.

My advice is do yourself a favor and go buy a low angle WR and stop driving yourself crazy with this one!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


#5 posted 06-03-2015 03:25 PM

You guys were spot on. The throat was thicker on the right side. Since it didn’t seem like I had anything to lose, I went about thinning it out with my file. Now it is much better. The jaws on my caliper aren’t the right shape to get a good consistent measurement, but by eye it is pretty even across, and now I can get a full width shaving. It might not be perfect, but at least it is usable.

I would like to have a whole new set of planes for sure. Right now I’m going to try and stick to a more limited budget. I need a #4 or #3 as well. For that I am going to try and find an honest LJ with an already restored one. A couple of guys have already shared some options.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#6 posted 06-03-2015 09:14 PM

Just FYI if you want to see how flat the mouth lead in is now. Color the area with a sharpie, and using some lapping compound rub the blade around – the high spots will have the color removed. Another method is to use a candle to soot the area and then rub the back of the blade on it. The 12-960 and 12-920 newer Stanley block planes I purchased had all surfaces machined in the proper plane, and they do just fine after some tuning. As you’ve now learned, surfaces machined in the proper plane is one of the 1st things to inspect. The cheaper planes work fine once tuned properly, but sometimes it takes an extra sample or 2 to get one machined correctly.

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#7 posted 06-03-2015 09:50 PM

You/re on the right track re: buying a plane from a LJ’er.

Stay away from Ebay.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1396 days


#8 posted 06-04-2015 12:24 AM

Go with a #4 next. I use my #4 waaaaay more than I thought I would.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#9 posted 06-04-2015 12:46 AM



You/re on the right track re: buying a plane from a LJ er.

Stay away from Ebay.

- Robert Engel

What if the LJ’er sells on eBay??? :) :) :)

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#10 posted 06-04-2015 01:54 AM

Everyone should sell on eBay… lol

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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bandit571

14547 posts in 2144 days


#11 posted 06-04-2015 02:04 AM

Of course, there is always a Rust Hunt

And find a Stanley No. 5,Type 6….for $3

This little block plane came from Ebay

Wasn’t cheap. But it is a Millers Falls 56B Low angle, adjustable mouth block plane. And this was right out of the mailing box.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


#12 posted 06-04-2015 02:08 AM

you need to put a camber on your blade, that is to file back the corners so the front of your iron is a convex curve instead of straight, if you have the side to side adjustment right and have a decent camber you can’t go wrong. if you like I can show you the camber on mine

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#13 posted 06-04-2015 02:13 AM

Mouth is adjustable right? So it’s not square to the adjustable part of the mouth?

A plane without a lateral might not be the best choice for a first plane.

Edit: I have a 60 1/2 that has served me well and I’ve abandoned it for a Stanley g12-220. It’s not low angle, but if it’s sharp it hardly matters even on end grain. Having the lateral is awesome.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


#14 posted 06-04-2015 02:22 AM

i have bought lei neilson planes as well as vintage stanley bailey’s and restored them. I would very highly recommend going with a vintage stanley bailey #4. anywhere from 10-50$ and a little cleanup and you’ve got a plane that will work every single bit as good as a 400$ neilson.

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying

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exelectrician

2327 posts in 1888 days


#15 posted 06-04-2015 09:32 PM

I love ebay – Got most of my best planes there. But then I am not afraid of rust, or lack of totes etc,.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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