LumberJocks

Building raised panel cabinet doors, need new router

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by parity_check posted 06-01-2015 01:41 PM 1519 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View parity_check's profile

parity_check

8 posts in 551 days


06-01-2015 01:41 PM

Hello all,

I’ve been lurking around these forums and have gotten alot of good info. I finally have the need to make a post.

Below is my situation. Any feedback is much appreciated.

I have an old Craftsman 1.5HP and a Wolfcraft router table that I used to get my feet wet. It has been fine for routing groves in hardwood flooring for the purpose of making a border. The Craftsman is very noisy and only has a 1/4” collet. I figured now is a good time to upgrade to a nicer tool since I will be doing some more projects in the future.

Amazon has a $50 off $200 for Bosch orders therefor I am considering the following:

MRC23EVSK- $269 – $50 = $219
1617EVS- $167. Would have to spend another $33 on Bosch to trigger the $50 discount. I was considering adding the Bosch RA1181 router table for $170. Both Items would come out to $286 with the discount

There’s also the Hitachi M12VC for $125. Everyone says this one’s the quietest and its also considerably cheaper than the Bosch leaving some extra money for bits and accessories. A quiet router might allow me to work later into the evening since I have an attached townhome and my Neighbor hates me because he goes to bed at 8pm.

The cabinet doors I was planning on making require the use of a bit with a backcutter liken this one from Yonico

I would assume the 2-1/4HP class of routers could handle this type of load.

So there you have it. I am open to any suggestions!

Thanks,
-Joe


31 replies so far

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


#1 posted 06-01-2015 01:46 PM



Hello all,

I ve been lurking around these forums and have gotten alot of good info. I finally have the need to make a post.


Welcome

I would assume the 2-1/4HP class of routers could handle this type of load.

I would encourage you to go with a 3 HP router. More power.

You don’t mention how you plan on mounting the router in a table. Select your router lift before you buy the router. Some lifts only support certain routers.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View parity_check's profile

parity_check

8 posts in 551 days


#2 posted 06-01-2015 01:51 PM

Hmmm,, router lift? If I buy a Bosch fixed base router and a Bosch table, I still need to buy something else?

Is a router lift necessary? My old router just screwed into the table. I’m guessing the lift makes adjustments easier?

Is this is what you are referring to?

http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-RA1165-Under-Table-Router-Above-Table/dp/B0007VHPFK

Thanks!

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#3 posted 06-01-2015 02:05 PM

I have the big Triton (3-1/2 hp or whatever) in a Rockler insert plate. With the Triton, I can adjust height without a lift through top. The Triton also locks the arbor when raised to full height allowing 1 wrench bit changes without pushing a lock button or anything…very nice. And, the big HP really routes nicely :)

I believe the big Bosch has similar capabilities. Highland had the Triton on sale about 2 yrs back so I went with it.

I’d bet all new big routers have these features but also look for soft start (starts up low RPMs and winds up to speed) and built-in speed control. You’ll want to slow down the big raised panel bits.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1938 posts in 1449 days


#4 posted 06-01-2015 02:14 PM

With the large diameter router bit in that set, you need a good hp router and sturdy table. Be careful using it.

Making those doors requires very accurate bit height adjustment and much easier with above table adjustments.

You will likely benefit from making some practice joints and doors.

Good Luck

View parity_check's profile

parity_check

8 posts in 551 days


#5 posted 06-01-2015 02:16 PM

The Triton is a bit out of my price range. I don’t have an issue with doing multiple passes on a 2.25HP router if the end result will be the same. I’m sure the Triton is a great product but not sure I can use it enough to justify the price tag since this is not something I will be using every day once my cabinets are finished.

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#6 posted 06-01-2015 02:30 PM

I understand. I mainly meant to be pointing out the features that made the Triton nice to use for raised panel tasks to help with your shopping criteria and the fact that not all routers will need a lift.

View parity_check's profile

parity_check

8 posts in 551 days


#7 posted 06-01-2015 02:37 PM

Thanks for all the responses. You guys have been very helpful in such a short amount of time! I assume everyone here is retired.. lol.

So the consensus here is that it would be unwise to go with anything under 3HP when using a large bit with a backcutter?

I would also consider using vertical bits since they might be more stable, but this would add to the complexity of the project because I am trying to make the panel flush with the rails/stiles.

I told my wife I could build her kitchen cabinets and would only need to spend another $300 on tools. Making the cabinet carcass is easy, its these doors that are tricky, as I am finding out. Do I need to petition for more money or is there some combo out there that can work within my budget?

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#8 posted 06-01-2015 02:58 PM

Go with the Bosch. Only real option left at your price point.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View parity_check's profile

parity_check

8 posts in 551 days


#9 posted 06-01-2015 03:02 PM

Timber- Any preference for the MRC23 or the 1617? They both have about the same HP, the MRC23 is a newer model. I will be mounting to the Bosch router table.

View Andre's profile

Andre

1021 posts in 1267 days


#10 posted 06-01-2015 03:23 PM

I have a old Veritas router table with a 2.25 hp Ridgid router that cuts anything I need so far just fine, you start getting into 2” plus bits you need a decent table or what I use, a shaper, feed slower or take more passes unless you need or have the desire to run a production shop. Used to get caught up in that buy bigger and the best, spend a $100 to save $1.00 found out time is cheap! Buy what will work and what you can afford, there are a lot of people on this site that money is not an object and yes you can justify almost anything in the name of safety but remember usually it is the tool holding the tool that makes the difference!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#11 posted 06-01-2015 03:43 PM



Timber- Any preference for the MRC23 or the 1617? They both have about the same HP, the MRC23 is a newer model. I will be mounting to the Bosch router table.

- parity_check

The 1617 seems to get the nod for most people in the router forums. It is a tried and true design.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2177 posts in 1486 days


#12 posted 06-01-2015 11:59 PM

A router lift is a handy accessory, NOT a requirement.

I see the Yonico bit is designed to cut 1 1/8” material for the panels and 1” for the rails and stiles. That would make the faces of the panels proud of the rail and stile frame (granted, you don’t have to cut at full depth with those bits). Do you really need to use material that thick? 3/4” seems to be the standard. I would go thicker only if the doors were to be really massive and heavy.

But something about this puzzles me: Years ago, only pro shops and schools had the huge planers that could thickness material to 5/8,” which was the standard thickness for panels going into 3/4” frames. Then Ryobi invented the portable planer, meaning us ordinary mortals could own one, and we could plane our own 5/8” panels. So the reaction to that seems to have been that the back cutting bit needed to be invented so we could use 3/4” material for the panels, even though we had the capability to easily make 5/8” thick panels. I look at a lot of panel making bits in various catalogs, and it’s almost impossible to find a panel bit that is intended for 5/8” material.

Personally, it makes no sense to me to use thicker wood and then have to back cut the panels. Right now, I am sitting at my roll top desk that I built about 30 years ago, looking at the backs of the panels inset by 1/8” on the inside of the desk, and they look just fine to me.

Am I the only one who feels this way, or am I just a lonely old cranki?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2692 days


#13 posted 06-02-2015 12:53 AM

I have personal experience cutting raised panels for doors from hard maple and also poplar. I used the Bosch 1617 the first time around on poplar. I ran it at its slowest speed and made multiple passes until I had the desired result.

Saying that, I did not use a back cutter. I don’t know if you have to make one pass only. Maybe someone else can jump in and give some advice.

I had a problem with the Rockler insert plate I was using. The hole was too small to allow the 3 1/2 inch cutter to be positioned properly to cut the panels. I wound up adding a 1/4 inch addition to the table top and got the job done.

Like mentioned above, Highland Woodworking had their Triton on sale and I bought it. It eats up the material while just coasting along. I switched to the Kreg insert plates for my new table. The hole is bigger so the problem with the cutter interference was eliminated.

Note: The Bosch fixed base is what you need if you go with the Bosch. The Kreg plate has a hole predrilled so you can adjust the bit height by inserting the supplied hex key to access the adjustment under the table. You do have to reach under the table to lock/unlock the base so the router can be repositioned.

The Triton also has above the table adjustment and it will lock the shaft when it is cranked up all the way thus only one wrench is needed to change bits.

Here’s some reading material for you.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/101964

And the buffet we built. The doors were made using the Bosch 1617EVSPK.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/93006

Maybe you will get some ideas or info that will help you make your decision.

If I were to buy one router for those doors, I would make it a 3hp or more. The Triton is advertised at 3 1/4hp. There are several other manufacturers that make 3+hp models s well.

Good luck.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#14 posted 06-02-2015 01:08 AM

I used a back cutter raised panel bit and made multiple passes but adjusting the fence between passes. Started with the fence covering most of the bit and ran each panel. Moved fence over in 2 or 3 increments until panels were fully cut. Final adjustment to fence was very slight to make the last pass a very thin cut.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1888 days


#15 posted 06-02-2015 01:21 AM

I beg to differ – A router lift IS a requirement. I cannot imagine doing any raised panel work without the absolute accuracy this setup demands. Then you have the ability of changing bits above table, therefore a lift is an absolute must.

Go with the Bosch 1617evs the most popular router on the market.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

showing 1 through 15 of 31 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com