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MDF up in flames!

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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 05-30-2015 01:18 PM 1353 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


05-30-2015 01:18 PM

Well, yesterday I burned every scrap and usable piece of MDF in my shop.
I already purged all the Chinese plywood, too.

Don’t know what it did for the environment, but if felt like a purging to me.

I know what do I gotta do if I don’t want Chinese plywood and I’m willing do spend the money.

I will spend the $72/sheet my supplier wants for domestic birch ply the heck with it!

As I recall, China was dumping tires on the US market till a trade law was enacted.
So now the price of tires is 50% higher, but at least it is fair trade.

We need some fair trade laws, guys, or our domestic lumber companies will be out of business.
If they haven’t already, when China starts making OSB and dimensional lumber its gonna be bad.

Any opinions or is there a lumber industry guy out there in the know about this?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


15 replies so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23188 posts in 2332 days


#1 posted 05-30-2015 01:35 PM

One reason for the big jump in hardwood lumber is that China now imports a larger share of the market to China. And then, of course, ships it back us in the way of furniture and other finished wood products. Naturally we cannot compete with their labor rate or their lack of safety and other regulations. They also spend next to nothing on their environmental regulations. Our cost of manufacturing are and will be so much higher than theirs for the foreseeable future. The only thing on the plus side is that lumber is a good export and relieves our trade deficit. However, the rising cost of lumber puts more pressure on prices of products here and expenses to people who earn their living from the use of lumber.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View MNclone's profile

MNclone

187 posts in 1049 days


#2 posted 05-30-2015 02:11 PM



One reason for the big jump in hardwood lumber is that China now imports a larger share of the market to China. And then, of course, ships it back us in the way of furniture and other finished wood products. Naturally we cannot compete with their labor rate or their lack of safety and other regulations. They also spend next to nothing on their environmental regulations. Our cost of manufacturing are and will be so much higher than theirs for the foreseeable future. The only thing on the plus side is that lumber is a good export and relieves our trade deficit. However, the rising cost of lumber puts more pressure on prices of products here and expenses to people who earn their living from the use of lumber.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

- helluvawreck


On the flip side, labor costs in China have gone up 10% per year for a few years now. While they are a long ways from US labor rates, the gap is ever so slowly closing. Unfortunately the solution won’t be to move back to the U.S. just find another low cost country.

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

296 posts in 742 days


#3 posted 05-30-2015 02:29 PM

If their labor rates went up 10% they must make about 15 cents an hour now. Living the big life.
Gerald

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2532 days


#4 posted 05-30-2015 02:31 PM

Good call. I’ve been using domestic for a while don’t care about the cost diff.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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helluvawreck

23188 posts in 2332 days


#5 posted 05-30-2015 02:36 PM

I agree with you MN. I have a son in law who works for my brother in law who has a large construction scaffolding business. Through Chinese factories he manufactures scaffolding and sells it through out the world. The son in law is their liason between the factories they use and the company that he works for. He and my daughter live in China and will continue to do so for the next few years. Naturally because of the nature of the product and liabilities involved they have to exercise a very strict quality control system.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1491 days


#6 posted 05-31-2015 04:07 AM

Just a thought: the British Empire thrived on importing raw materials (like Honduras mahogany from Belize, just for an example), then manufacturing products from the imports to sell back to the colonies. The colonies got the short end of the stick in that deal. The Brits got rich.

I’m wondering if we’re seeing a similar pattern here. Yes, I realize there are differences.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2574 days


#7 posted 06-01-2015 01:51 AM

Burning MDF gives off toxic fumes. I hope you and the rest of the population were upwind. Check into it. You didn’t do the environment a favor, notwithstanding what the utilities get away with.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View Matt Rogers's profile

Matt Rogers

69 posts in 1435 days


#8 posted 06-01-2015 12:33 PM

Yea, I don’t know what state you are in, but NY has a complete burn ban on every piece of trash, including plywood and MDF. Think about what you do in terms of the potential side effects. What did it save you? A few bucks at the dump? Some time? All in the name of polluting your lungs and causing a small amount of cancer in the children down the street. Sounds like a poor trade-off to me.

So next time you decide to poison the world, keep it to yourself and don’t look to the internet for validation.

-- Matt Rogers, http://www.cleanairwoodworks.com and http://www.cleanairyurts.com

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#9 posted 06-01-2015 05:19 PM

Matt, that’s a bit over the top, don’t you think?

1. It was a few pieces total was maybe 2 square feet.
2. My closest neighbor is over 1000 feet away. The prevailing wind that day took it toward an 8000 acre tract of timber my property joins.
3. The environmental impact was microscopic to say the least.

Every time you guys buy something in plastic you did more damage than I did burning a few scraps!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3023 posts in 1263 days


#10 posted 06-01-2015 05:35 PM

So “every scrap and usable piece” of mdf was 2 square feet?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Matt Rogers's profile

Matt Rogers

69 posts in 1435 days


#11 posted 06-01-2015 06:49 PM

I second that – why even take the time to let us know about 2 square feet?
The fact remains – Why are you trying to get validation for burning processed wood that you should not be burning? You even state that you question the act in regards to the potential environmental damage.

It is like me making a post saying that I dumped all of my pesticides into a lake or storm drain to get rid of them and expecting people to respond by telling me “good for you for getting rid of those crappy pesticides!”. (I don’t actually have any, but just to illustrate the point)

Just saying. It’s a free country so break whatever laws you want about polluting the air and water on your own time, but don’t expect me to congratulate you for it. We all make mistakes and get lazy sometimes, but this sure seemed like a deliberate act without regards to the consequences.

-- Matt Rogers, http://www.cleanairwoodworks.com and http://www.cleanairyurts.com

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 689 days


#12 posted 06-01-2015 07:09 PM

Actually, his post was about Chinese products and their inferiority and willingness to pay more for a better made product.

Seems like you guys missed the actual point and decided to just tell the guy he’s breaking laws.
There was nothing about validation of him burning.
If there was a validation of anything, it was the idea of not using chinese plywood and mdf.

And fyi, I burn all my scrap wood, cardboard, mdf, and papers and it’s all legal. Just because your state doesn’t allow it, does not mean others do not so don’t be so quick to accuse others of breaking the law.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#13 posted 06-02-2015 12:20 AM

Thank you for rescuing me, AZ!!

I’m really a pretty nice guy you know…....

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1912 days


#14 posted 06-02-2015 12:30 AM



Thank you for rescuing me, AZ!!

I m really a pretty nice guy you know…....

- Robert Engel


I don’t doubt it, what was wrong with the Chinese plywood anyway?

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 689 days


#15 posted 06-02-2015 03:13 AM


I don t doubt it, what was wrong with the Chinese plywood anyway?

- distrbd

I’m not sure his reasoning, but I have a mixed opinion on it.
I actually love the character on some of the sheets I have bought. My problem is that it can warp really, really bad.
Especially the 1/4” ones.

I can’t complain about Chinese things too much though, as my wife is a Chinese import as well haha.
Of course, she’ll be the first one to say, if something breaks, that it must have come from China.

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