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Forum topic by JeffP posted 05-29-2015 10:04 PM 937 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


05-29-2015 10:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I was tempted to put this in the “safety” category. No doubt there will be those who mention the phrase “death wish” in conjunction with this “idea” (not new, I know).

So here’s the deal. Like many of you, my shop space is limited. I’m already going to have carts with various “bench top power tools” moving around two or three layers deep in there. Just don’t think I can put up with having my sheet goods stored on a “sheet goods cart”.

So I’m planning to make a “hinged” and “hoisted” sheet goods holder up in the rafters. Thinking of using one of these cheap 120V hoists for making it “open” down to an angled position that will keep the boards from toppling out onto the floor but almost vertical for ease of sorting and putting in and out:

http://www.harborfreight.com/1100-lb-electric-hoist-with-remote-control-60345-9279.html

Since it is from HF, I figure I would add some sort of an additional hook-like mechanism as a safety stop that would be rotated out of the way before lowering it.

I looked through LJ search and couldn’t find any designs to steal from (maybe I’m the only one crazy enough?).

Anybody have any links for me to look at for more ideas on this?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.


15 replies so far

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1400 days


#1 posted 05-29-2015 10:15 PM

Sounds like a good idea to me. Just make sure the thing you attach the hoist to can hold 1100 lbs…

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4032 posts in 1816 days


#2 posted 05-29-2015 11:10 PM

Insane. The only thing to keep you from getting crushed is Harbor Freight quality control. A real sword of Damocles. I couldn’t work under something like that.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#3 posted 05-29-2015 11:50 PM

I’ve seen an online video of someone that did something similar but don’t recall details…but, there is one out there somewhere :) I recall thinking of doing something similar in my small shop.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 742 days


#4 posted 05-30-2015 12:18 AM

I can see using the hoist to raise and lower it. But once it is up, I would secure it with extra chains, or something, just be confident that I would be safe working under it.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#5 posted 05-30-2015 01:06 AM

From JeffP’s original post :)

Since it is from HF, I figure I would add some sort of an additional hook-like mechanism as a safety stop that would be rotated out of the way before lowering it.


View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 742 days


#6 posted 05-30-2015 01:07 AM



From JeffP s original post :)

Since it is from HF, I figure I would add some sort of an additional hook-like mechanism as a safety stop that would be rotated out of the way before lowering it.

- hotbyte

My apologies I missed that.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View madts's profile

madts

1683 posts in 1804 days


#7 posted 05-30-2015 01:09 AM

As a sheet of 3/4” plywood weighs about 60 lbs. ten sheets 60o lbs The question is, can your joists or what ever is going to carry the load, take this.
I thing some engineering is needed for this.

Madts.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 742 days


#8 posted 05-30-2015 01:14 AM

How close will the support be to a load bearing wall?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2574 days


#9 posted 05-30-2015 02:28 AM



Insane. The only thing to keep you from getting crushed is Harbor Freight quality control. A real sword of Damocles. I couldn t work under something like that.

- bondogaposis

I remember an old Mad Magazine cartoon called “Laboring Under a Misapprehension”. That is what this idea makes me think of.

Madts is on the right track with having some engineering help. This indeed can be a deadly idea.

My personal recommendation would be to install columns in appropriate places to take the load. You can only get away with so much.

Does your shop allow for columns? Mine does not not, since it is just a tiny portion of a garage.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#10 posted 05-30-2015 11:49 AM


... This indeed can be a deadly idea.

My personal recommendation would be to install columns in appropriate places to take the load. You can only get away with so much.

Does your shop allow for columns? Mine does not not, since it is just a tiny portion of a garage.

- Dark_Lightning

My old garage building (shop) has “car door” on one half and man door on other half…so yes, down the center I can put a couple of columns without creating a problem. Have been planning to do this and some new cross beams anyway to shore up the existing (75 year old) structure and make a stable platform for replacement garage door tracks and opener.

I have a vested interest in my own safety…it will be done with reasonable safety precautions.

I’m wondering what sort of an inexpensive “track saw” sort of an arrangement I can add to this thing such that when I lower it, I’m all set to easily break down a sheet while it is still more or less “in place” in the sheet storage “gondola”. Just a convenient way to arrange some sacrificial stringers between top sheet and others and a way to clamp a board on there as a guide for a circular saw. If you have seen some cheap but clever setups for this I would like to look at them.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#11 posted 05-30-2015 12:15 PM

I’d use the space aloft for other things you don’t use often and store the sheet goods the old fashioned way. Just me….

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1472 days


#12 posted 05-30-2015 05:06 PM

Back when I was into motorcycling I knew several guys that stored their trailers up in the rafters. Something similar would work for your idea! Here’s a video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cNzmY3qOoc

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#13 posted 05-30-2015 05:30 PM

Thanks Joe. Very cool.

Exactly the same HF hoist I’m using for mine. They are on sale right now at HF and I was just about to buy one…when a used one came up on CL. Just snagged that for a good price this morning.

I plan to hinge mine on one end though. Would prefer to have it come down to near-vertical when it is down. Seems like it would be easier to “shuffle” the sheet I want up to the top of the stack that way.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2440 posts in 1874 days


#14 posted 05-31-2015 01:32 AM

I am not too sure about the hoist thing above my head. Could you post a picture of what you have maybe that will help with some ideas. A concern you might have if you make it work is lighting. Having no idea how your shop looks I can only use mine as a reference. I use the open joist space for storage of various items to include some small width and length sheet goods. (less than 24” wide and less than 30” long) When I first shoved a longer piece up and left it I noticed it stuck out and covered a good portion of my overhead light making that side look like it was in shadow. When I was younger I could care less, now I want the lights as good as I can get. (laughing)

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1472 days


#15 posted 05-31-2015 12:50 PM

Scroll down this thread, several pics of what folks did with their M/C trailers.
.
http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?235418-Overhead-storage-to-put-a-trailer-on

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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