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Looking for help finding / making a MT #2 to 1" x 8 tpi spindle adapter

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Forum topic by AlexLumber posted 05-28-2015 07:56 PM 1528 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AlexLumber

9 posts in 554 days


05-28-2015 07:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe spindle adapter 1 x 8 tpi

Hi.

I have an old beaver / Rockwell lathe that I am itching to mount a chuck to. I have the chuck and it threads onto a 1” x 8 tpi thread. The problem is my headstock only accepts a MT #2.

Does anyone have one of these adapters I could buy?

Alternatively, I bought a MT #2 with a stub end that can be turned to any thread type. If someone can turn a 1”x8tpi onto the end that would be stellar as well.

This is the stub in question:

p.s. I know bestwoodtools sells exactly this adapter but at 80$ + shipping its too expensive.


22 replies so far

View mrg's profile

mrg

658 posts in 2459 days


#1 posted 05-28-2015 08:41 PM

Your lathe has no threads on the head stock? How would you do face plate turning?

Woodcraft has one of these like what you have pictured and you would need an adaptor to screw the chuck on. Also you would need a draw bar to go through the head stock and screw into the end of the morse taper and have a nut and washer on the other end so the adaptor and chuck doesn’t come off the headstock.

Maybe if you post a picture of the headstock the community can help you out.

-- mrg

View Bmezz's profile

Bmezz

34 posts in 843 days


#2 posted 05-28-2015 10:33 PM

That lathe originally came with an adapter that looks very much like your picture. An original would be difficult to find. Perhaps an ad in Canadingwoodworking might get you one as it is a Canadian machine. You may find that $80 is not too high. The original had a bolt through the headstock to keep a chuck or the faceplate from dismounting. I would think it is unsafe without that bolt. Good luck.

-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa

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Bmezz

34 posts in 843 days


#3 posted 05-28-2015 10:42 PM

Here is an image of the original adaptor:
https://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=84429&d=1420232205

-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 761 days


#4 posted 05-28-2015 11:00 PM

Here is one at Amazon that may work. It does not say it is a live center so I ASSUME it is a dead center.
It will also have to be threaded for a draw bar or you could tap it pretty easily.
http://www.amazon.com/Hold-Fast-Chuck-Reversing-Adapter/dp/B0036AYYFS

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View AlexLumber's profile

AlexLumber

9 posts in 554 days


#5 posted 05-29-2015 02:48 AM

Hi, Thanks for the replies.

Yes I believe the original came with a mt#2 to 1×8 adapter but I am not the original owner and that is long gone (by the way, the link to the image requires a log in to display). I am unable to use a face plate nor a proper chuck. Best I can do at the moment is a drill chuck.

The blank adapter I have pictured above has a thread on the back to receive a draw bar. If only I can find someone that can turn a 1×8 onto the blank.

The amazon/woodcraft reversing adapter might be an option. Does anyone know if its made of steel? I ask because the one I have in my picture is aluminium and not designed for powered application.

View mrg's profile

mrg

658 posts in 2459 days


#6 posted 05-29-2015 03:11 AM

If it’s the Nova adaptor your asking about, it is steel.

-- mrg

View AlexLumber's profile

AlexLumber

9 posts in 554 days


#7 posted 05-29-2015 03:15 AM


If it s the Nova adaptor your asking about, it is steel.

- mrg

I am referring to to the hold-fast reversing adapter linked above.

View Bmezz's profile

Bmezz

34 posts in 843 days


#8 posted 05-29-2015 10:25 AM

Let’s see if this works. #4 is the adaptor.

-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa

View AlexLumber's profile

AlexLumber

9 posts in 554 days


#9 posted 05-29-2015 11:12 AM

Ah. Yes that’s what I need.
Do you know the thread size on the original adapter?

View Bmezz's profile

Bmezz

34 posts in 843 days


#10 posted 05-29-2015 11:58 AM

I think it was 7/8×14tpi.

-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3926 posts in 1953 days


#11 posted 06-02-2015 11:36 AM

I’m not sure if you are still on your quest for the MT2-1”x 8 spindle, but here's one for a lot less than you might find it elsewhere.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View AlexLumber's profile

AlexLumber

9 posts in 554 days


#12 posted 06-03-2015 01:03 PM

I definitely still am on the hunt.
Thanks Fred. That Hold fast adapter is mentioned above as well. It seems to be the most viable option at the moment. I’ll have to weld a nut on the and to be able to use a draw bolt.

The other option is finding someone to machine my blank adapter.

It may be that the problem is compounded by a shorter than usual MT#2 in my head-stock. I am not sure how large the gap between the back of the shoulder on the adapter and the head stock will be.

View Nubsnstubs's profile (online now)

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1190 days


#13 posted 06-03-2015 02:17 PM

Alex, why don’t you look for a new spindle, or have someone to make one for you. Everybody knows someone that knows a machinist.

I could do it, but don’t have the confidence to make the internal MT2 taper. It would be made solid. The threads and bearing surfaces are a piece of cake. But, you are in Canada and that makes it unlikely. Mail costs going across the international border would make it cheaper to get it done on your side.

The adapter you pictured, and the one in the link has a tang that would need to come off so it could be bored and threaded for the draw bar, part# 24 in the headstock picture.

Join Practical Machinist forum, and see if there are members near you.if there are none that could help, they could at least steer you to a machine shop near you. Making a new spindle with 1×8tpi is you best bet.

You really don’t need a through hole with a taper. It’s only good for a spur, and there are alternatives. You could remove the taper from your drill chuck, and mount it into your chuck to do any drilling needed. So, through hole isn’t really necessary.

If you have further questions, contact me at gmwoodwoprking78@msn.com …...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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AlexLumber

9 posts in 554 days


#14 posted 06-03-2015 04:00 PM

Hi Jerry,

A new spindle would be a good option. I don’t really need the internal MT#2 so it can be solid.
I figured machining just a thread on the blank adapter I have would be the simple option vs a new spindle entirely.

I don’t know any machinists. I am trying to find someone that could help. I posted on the local Practical Machinist forum category but no one has responded.

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2445 days


#15 posted 06-03-2015 04:22 PM

The thing about machinists is that they can sometimes come off as a little cranky, but that is usually because everyone is always asking them to “do this one favor” and it eats a lot of time (the guys at PM can be especially so towards non-machinists or amateurs). I do some machining as part of my hobby, but not a lot, and I can tell you that having a machinist thread your blank is a little less simple than some might think. No, it’s not overly complicated, but first they have to adapt their lathe spindle to accept a MT2 taper. Then they have to make sure it’s all set up very concentric. This can take quite a while with a test indicator and light mallet taps. Then they have to single point thread the 1×8 thread, which takes quite a while because they can only take relatively light passes (especially if the blank arbor has been hardened at all). The threads on a 1×8 are rather deep, so it could be on the order of 50 passes with the single point threading tool.

In short, the $80 one is not all that outlandish, considering that otherwise you have the blank arbor and the cost of machining at a typical rate of about $60/hr. That job might not quite take an hour, but could be close.

As for a solid spindle, that would make it very easy to use, but resale value could be hurt if it doesn’t have an internal taper that would allow the new user to use things like a steb center and the like. On the whole, I would recommend getting the right part or become a machinist’s very close friend and don’t ask for any favors for a while before asking them to do this :). Just keep in mind that, with a woodworker’s perspective looking at machining, figure everything takes 10 times longer and costs 10 times as much as your initial estimate.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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