LumberJocks

Help With Tung Oil

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Tim & Candy Hicks posted 09-03-2009 09:43 PM 1349 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Tim & Candy Hicks's profile

Tim & Candy Hicks

297 posts in 2453 days


09-03-2009 09:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hello Fellow lumberjockers and jocketts. My husband and I are going to use tung oil for the first time. It will be applied to a table top that has turquoise inlay. My question is, how do you think it will affect the inlay? Should be try and keep it off the inlay, do you think it will stain the turquoise. If we get a bit on the turquoise will it just wipe off?

This table is going to an art gallery so we want to make sure that it is perfect and we are on a time crunch so the less mistakes the better.

Thanks for all your help, hope everyone is thriving and prosperous.

There is always room in your life for thinking bigger, pushing limits, imagining the unimaginable.

-- www.rmtwist.com


9 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15777 posts in 2962 days


#1 posted 09-03-2009 10:12 PM

Are you talking about pure tung oil, or one of the products commonly found in stores that are really a combination of tung oil and varnish?

Either way, I don’t think it would hurt the turquoise. But I would recommend wiping it off the turquoise as much as possible, just because it might not want to dry well and would either be sticky or oily.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View patron's profile (online now)

patron

13156 posts in 2084 days


#2 posted 09-03-2009 10:19 PM

ditto with charlie ,
do your thing with the oil,
then clean of the turquoise .
it will not soak in like the wood .
just wait till you are done with the oil.
mabe some mineral spirits if necessary .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Tim & Candy Hicks's profile

Tim & Candy Hicks

297 posts in 2453 days


#3 posted 09-03-2009 10:23 PM

We are going to use Polymerized Tung Oil.

Thanks for the info, it helps a lot

-- www.rmtwist.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2843 days


#4 posted 09-03-2009 10:44 PM

I’m with the others and I would use a tung oil product, not straight tung oil. The blends handle best.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View patron's profile (online now)

patron

13156 posts in 2084 days


#5 posted 09-03-2009 10:46 PM

p.s. what kind of epoxy do you use for the inlays ,
i have done many , and with tuquios to ,
but have to stand around with a spray bottle of laquer thiner for a couple of hours ,
to burst the heat bubbles .
and i always spray poly in the area first , as i tint my epoxy with colors , and it will bleed into the grain ?

your work is stunning , you make a great team !

thanks .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View scott shangraw's profile

scott shangraw

513 posts in 2812 days


#6 posted 09-04-2009 03:46 AM

Candy-I use tung oil and alot of other oil mixes etc. on my pieces with turquiose and my carved bowls which almost all have inlay in them .I have never had any problems with it effecting tghe inlay at all.Now I have never used it on man made turquiose just the real stones.

-- Scott NM,http://www.shangrilawoodworks.com

View Tim & Candy Hicks's profile

Tim & Candy Hicks

297 posts in 2453 days


#7 posted 09-04-2009 03:58 AM

Hi Patron, we do not use epoxy, we use CA glue which is like a super super glue. we do not have to worry about bubbling and all that, we do however have to watch that is does not run everywhere. They glue will stain the wood so we use a sealer before we start the inlay process.

Hello Scott

Thanks for the input. We use the real stuff as well; so it is okay then to apply the oil over the inlay and I guess if neccessary we can rub off or buff up the turquoise with a cloth….

-- www.rmtwist.com

View FredG's profile

FredG

140 posts in 2440 days


#8 posted 09-04-2009 04:24 AM

Hi Candy,
Maybe this is of interest. Under the paragraph ‘Waxing and Oiling’
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise

-- Fred

View silverhalo's profile

silverhalo

12 posts in 2376 days


#9 posted 10-16-2009 07:39 AM

I’m a little late to this topic but as a silversmith I work with Turquoise quite a bit.
Natural turquoise, which is straight from the ground without any processing, is quite porous and will absorb oils. The old Indian traders would soak low grade Turquoise in various oils to enhance the color of the stones. Natural Turquoise only makes up about 1 percent of all Turquoise sold today, most of it is “Stabilized”(to strengthen the stone) or “Enhanced”(to “liven” the color) by chemical means. Most of this “treated” turquoise will still absorb some oils but not as readily as natural turquoise will. Most Turquoise these days come from China so you really never know what you are getting, unless you buy from a reputable dealer. But for inlay work it really doesn’t matter so much.

It is great when I get to do repairs on old Turquoise jewelry and get to see how much the stone’s color has changed from where it has been in contact with the owners skin and the affects of years and years of body oils on it. Definitely gives it a great patina.

-You can always cover the inlay first with a coat of dewaxed shellac for protection before you use any oils. It’s a great natural sealer for nearly anything.

-- Robert Reznik - Albuquerque, NM - www.robertreznik.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase