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veneer on bent mdf board

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Forum topic by JeffP posted 05-28-2015 02:04 AM 728 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JeffP

573 posts in 860 days


05-28-2015 02:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: veneering

The design I cooked up for my open “modern looking” bathroom vanity includes a semi circular (think 1/4 of a drum shape) bent piece of thin MDF that will be bent around some permanent ribs (below the sink bowl – to hide the drain and bobstops etc.).

The outer surface of that will have maple veneer on it.

I’m assuming the right (only) way to do this veneering is to do it AFTER the MDF is bent around and permanently attached to the ribs that will give it its final shape.

Question is…how do you do a decent job of veneering a curved panel like that? Easy enough to cut some veneer to fit and put wood glue on it and slap it on there.

Easy enough to roll it on with a j-roller or a rounded stick…but then what? Doesn’t seem like i have any good way to “clamp it” after I put it on there.

I don’t have any vacuum stuff. I’m thinking maybe just make an extra piece of the MDF and bend that around it and clamp it in a few places around the edges?

help?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.


9 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2111 days


#1 posted 05-28-2015 02:41 AM

I have used sand bags (conform to curve) to “clamp” veneer on curved surfaces. This was small repairs not a whole bathroom vanity.

Oh, forgot to add I also have made a Curved Clamping Cauls on other projects.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#2 posted 05-28-2015 02:41 AM

Personally I would hammer veneer it. There are other ways like pva glue and an iron but my preference would be to hammer it. You can hammer veneer around a curve quite easily.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#3 posted 05-28-2015 02:42 AM

I’d do what shipwright says.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Daruc

459 posts in 601 days


#4 posted 05-28-2015 03:21 AM

Wrap it with a rope

-- -

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#5 posted 05-28-2015 03:33 AM

If Paul said it can be hammer veneered I believe him but the way I’ve done it in the past is this way.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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JeffP

573 posts in 860 days


#6 posted 05-28-2015 10:20 AM



Personally I would hammer veneer it. There are other ways like pva glue and an iron but my preference would be to hammer it. You can hammer veneer around a curve quite easily.

- shipwright

Thanks Paul. This “hammer” is essentially the same thing as the “rounded stick” that veneer dealers are suggesting these days (applies more concentrated pressure than a j-roller). As I understand it, the basic idea is to get it pressed down firmly enough that the stickiness and viscosity of the glue is sufficient to hold it flat until the glue sets up.

I think I will “hammer it”, but not sure I will use hyde glue. PVA seems like an easier alternative.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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JeffP

573 posts in 860 days


#7 posted 05-28-2015 10:28 AM



If Paul said it can be hammer veneered I believe him but the way I ve done it in the past is this way.

- a1Jim

I like this method too. I need to get over my notion of shop-built single-purpose jigs being a waste of time. Time and again I see this being sort of a “right of passage” to being a “real lumberjock”.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#8 posted 05-28-2015 03:17 PM

You can not hammer veneer with anything but hot hide glue. The process depends on the gelling of the glue as it cools. PVA will not work, nor will liquid hide glue.

There is however a learning curve to hide glue and to hammer veneeing in particular. It is more than well worth learning but I wouldn’t expect to just buy some glue and go hammer veneer a large cabinet.

I hope this sends you to a discovery of hide glue and all of its advantages rather than just to finding another way.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

8139 posts in 1760 days


#9 posted 05-28-2015 03:28 PM

I second the hammer veneering, and all of what Paul mentions directly above. My biggest hurdle, was mixing up the glue to the right consistency to effectively hammer veneer. (I watched many videos on hammer veneering, looking for a consistency I could see to aim for)

I bought a small pack of cheap veneer (mine was oak) to practice with before veneering anything of significance. I’d recommend the same approach to anyone looking to start hammer veneering.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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