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Radiant Floor heat - Anybody?

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Forum topic by bonesbr549 posted 05-27-2015 07:01 PM 731 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


05-27-2015 07:01 PM

Considering Radiant Heating in the next shop floor. Anybody out there do it? Experiences?

http://www.crete-heat.com/

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.


12 replies so far

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1015 posts in 1391 days


#1 posted 05-27-2015 09:37 PM

I have it in my shop floor. Love it.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

624 posts in 1414 days


#2 posted 05-27-2015 09:44 PM

Not in the shop, but in the master bath tile floor. The cats love it! If you have a shop cat, spring for the heated floor. :-)

View Andre's profile

Andre

1022 posts in 1268 days


#3 posted 05-27-2015 10:57 PM

have it in my shop, love the heat and the low operating cost but hate standing on Concrete!
Also need to watch the humidity as no air movement winters are long and cold up here. Shop is 24’ by 24’ with 10’ ceilings.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1746 days


#4 posted 05-27-2015 11:43 PM

I put it in my new shop 30 X 50’. By far better than any type of forced air heat. I had propane in my previous shop same size and could only afford to heat when was working, however I could only work a short time because my feet would get very cold. With this type heat everything is warm. I can work very comfortable at 55 degree setting. One of the two best things I did for my new shop. I also put a 1/2 bath in the shop, so no more quick trips to the house.

-- Bill R

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#5 posted 05-28-2015 12:11 AM

I had to chip out because they forgot to install the temp probe. I hit the pad. Not awesome.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1719 days


#6 posted 05-28-2015 01:11 AM

Bones, I have it in my current shop and love it. I keep the temperature at 55 or 60 degrees depending on the time of year and am never cold when working in the shop. IMO a major benefit is that it keeps the tools warm all the time so there is never a condensation issue. A side benefit is that your tools aren’t cold when you touch them. :) Just make certain that you put insulation and a vapor barrier between the ground and the concrete. HTH

-- Art

View Andre's profile

Andre

1022 posts in 1268 days


#7 posted 05-28-2015 03:12 AM

Fridge you been drinking again? LOL
Art 55 or 60 F I would be in my shorts sweating!
Bill 30’ by 50’ and a head, be still my heart, what a dream come true maybe next shop?

Bones don’t even think about it put it in and a bathroom if at all possible and do not make the biggest mistake of all by not running enough power outlets 110/220 to every wall and all on different breakers!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1640 posts in 1778 days


#8 posted 05-28-2015 03:21 AM

Used to have it in the old shop and it was great. We’ve moved to a new building that’s superior in just about every way except for the forced air heating. I do miss the quiet efficiency of the heated floor.

I do believe it’s possible to lay the PEX tubing under a wood floor too but am unsure about that.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1746 days


#9 posted 05-28-2015 01:19 PM


Fridge you been drinking again? LOL
Art 55 or 60 F I would be in my shorts sweating!
Bill 30 by 50 and a head, be still my heart, what a dream come true maybe next shop?

Bones don t even think about it put it in and a bathroom if at all possible and do not make the biggest mistake of all by not running enough power outlets 110/220 to every wall and all on different breakers!

- rad457

When I built this shop I tried to correct all the deficiencys that my old shop had. Yes, I did install 110/220 to every wall on different breakers. I also installed 110/220 drops from the ceiling for my saw in particular. I also installed 5/6 110 outlets in the ceiling. My previous shop had a ridge vent. I think this was a big heat loss and I actually had snow blow in which made a mess. This shop does not have a ridge vent, I installed gable vents in all the gables all around and to the roof peak at each end. The electric was run behind the walls and outlets were flush in my previous shop. I noticed a lot of cold air coming in through the outlets, so this shop all are run in conduit external. I also filled all the gaps created by the wainscot with foam before insulation. I went from 10’ ceilings to 12’ ceilings. The extra two feet creates more storage space. Windows, I had none in my previous shop. I put a 32” window on each wall of this shop. You don’t want to be running a saw and have a power failure in a shop with no windows. I wanted a drop ceiling, but cost was somewhat high, then I got the ceiling tiles free and installed it. Made a big difference brightened up the shop. Lighting , I put “ample” overhead lighting but put machine specific lights in place for working. And of course the 1/2 bath and radiant heat. These were the things important to me, your needs may be different. I had all the work done by electricians and plumbers, may have cost a bit more but I know it was done right and to all local codes.

-- Bill R

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2346 posts in 2459 days


#10 posted 05-28-2015 02:30 PM

I have had experience with radiant heat floors since mid 70’s.
IT IS THE BEST TYPE of heat out there.
The first one in 70’s used 1 1/4” black water pipe …...it is still functioning well. It was installed in a farm machinery repair shop, all the workers loved it.
We also installed it in a truck wash in Lacombe. 1 bay had floor heat other bay had radiant overhead heat. The floor heat was way more efficient than radiant. One again workers all wanted the floor heat.
The last one was my home in NORTHERN canada…..cold all the time. I had 3 zones, 1 in living area, 1 in shop area and 1 in bathroom. My heat bill was $64 per month, compared to neighbors natural gas $215/mo.
You will need some kind of air exchanger for air movement.
Also this is not a fast heat, leave the thermostat set at same all day.
My next home is going to have same floor heat using GEO-THERMAL tech as the heat source.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


#11 posted 05-28-2015 05:23 PM

Thanks for all the great feedback! As to my design, this is my last home. I’ve moved around most of my career and this is the last one.

I’ve got my land acquired as Smith Mountain Lake in VA, and can almost see then light at the end of the tunnel in two years (or that could be a train either way it will be over).

I’m working with a green builder, and have gained a ton of knowledge recently after mind numbing research. The goal is to have my shop and make furniture. I’ve got about a years worth of work at a given time (as a hobby).

Plan is to build the shop with an appartment over it. The shop will be big enough to house 5k BF lumber, and process thorugh and build and have a 10×10 finish room, and a small front office/display area for pieces and to meet clients. We plan on living over the shop while the house is built and then rent the apartment out after we get into the house.

Heat source for the shop will be an external wood furnace with heat exchanger and there is about 6 years worth of fuel on the building site to be cleared and that will help.

We looked at Geothermal, but the ROI may not justify based on my life expectancy (not trying to be morbid but realistic)

We scored 85 our of 100 on bennifit scale for solar, and with recent advancements in battery technology by Tesla, that cost is coming way down.

Putting in plenty of power and yes a bathroom for sure! It will be about 300 yards from the house, still not sold on it being that far away, but then a John Deere Mule might be in order.

I have my tools for the most part I need, so plenty of light/windows/power will be everywhere.

Lastly, I want my DC in the floor and 6” min ducts.

When the builder suggest that I go this style he recommended that if I was willing to put the pex down with his plan that could save a bunch on labor.

He indicated he’s done several woodshops like this and I plan on going to see one.

Wanted to know if anyone here had experienced it, so it sounds like a winner!

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2346 posts in 2459 days


#12 posted 05-28-2015 09:17 PM

Man you have done your homework.This is an ideal “Dream” Workshop for everyone. I wish you the very best in getting it done. Keep us all posted. This is one I would lik to see as it is been build.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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