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Basket Weave Pattern #1: How to do it

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Blog entry by toolfooldan posted 09-27-2017 11:13 AM 1267 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Basket Weave Pattern Technique

Adapted from the book “High Relief Wood Carving” by William J Schnute.

Layout a grid of squares.

Each side of the grid equal to the width of the carving gouge you’ll use. In this instance, the gouge is 5/16mm. Each side is therefore 16mm, or about 5/8”. Since I’m more imperial than metric, I used 5/8. Close enough.

Each side of each grid square will get a stop cut with the 5/16 gouge.

Mark orientation lines.

It’s real easy to make mistakes. So make some marks to help orient your gouge for the upcoming stop cuts. Mark every other square, as in a checker board pattern.

Make stop cuts

The key to avoid mistakes is to always place the cutting edge of the gouge parallel and below the orientation line. The outer edges of the gouge will meet the corners of the 5/8” square.

Now make stop cuts on one side of the marked squares.

Flip the work piece 180 deg and stop cut opposite side of square.

Complete the top and bottom “waves”.

Mark orientation lines for remaining squares.

These lines are perpendicular to first set of orientation lines.

Make 3rd set of stop cuts. Remember gouge is parallel and below the new orientation lines.

Flip work piece 180 degrees and make last group of stop cuts, opposite side of each square.

Begin roughing in the weave.

In this operation carve in the direction of the orientation lines. I used this gouge because it’s what I had, but I think a 1F or 2F/8 would do a better job.

Carve “against the grain” squares.

The rest is just cleaning up stop cuts and corners, and rounding the tops of the weaves.



6 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

561 posts in 2162 days


#1 posted 09-27-2017 11:59 AM

Impressive look broken down into a series of straightforward steps anyone can follow. Thanks for taking the “mystery” out of it. Now that I know how to do it, I just need to practice a lot to achieve similar results.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Julian's profile

Julian

1225 posts in 2505 days


#2 posted 09-27-2017 02:24 PM

Nicely explained. This would add a very nice look to various projects.

-- Julian

View sras's profile

sras

4646 posts in 2944 days


#3 posted 09-27-2017 03:15 PM

Thanks! An easy to understand presentation.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Chiaroscuro's profile

Chiaroscuro

65 posts in 589 days


#4 posted 09-29-2017 04:27 AM

Excellent detailed description!

So I spent a ½ hour testing this out on my chisel mallet… It went fast, but to actually get a nice smooth curve and visually emphasize the weave… I could have spent hours. Any tips?

-- Todd

View toolfooldan's profile

toolfooldan

52 posts in 1453 days


#5 posted 09-29-2017 01:41 PM



Excellent detailed description!

So I spent a ½ hour testing this out on my chisel mallet… It went fast, but to actually get a nice smooth curve and visually emphasize the weave… I could have spent hours. Any tips?

- Chiaroscuro

Hi Chiaroscuro,

Each of the weaves is basically an arc. Imagine that you could view this arc from the side, as in this clunky drawing.

It takes multiple cuts to make the arc. The first cut is steep and aims form the bottom of the stop cut. The 2nd cut is more shallow but again aiming for the bottom of the stop cut. Cuts 3 and 4 basically shave the high spots of the arc to make it more rounded. It appears to me that you need to do more 2,3,4 cuts.

Also note I’ve done this basket weave in basswood and needed only hand pressure to do the carving; it was fairly quick process. But yes this takes patience and time.

I hope this helps.

View Chiaroscuro's profile

Chiaroscuro

65 posts in 589 days


#6 posted 09-29-2017 09:23 PM

Thanks… yes, I think that made a difference. Tried the other side quickly with the stepped cuts and it visually looked better (I’m including a shot from farther away because I didn’t sand this one as opposed to the other and the facets look rough close up – farther away though the pattern pops). I added the grooving to emphasize the rope direction. I am also working in cherry and using the 5/12 that I lay out the pattern with to carve as I don’t have any fishtail gouges.

Anyway – thank you for the tutorial! I’m considering incorporating this into my next piece of furniture.

Todd

I suppose that’s a bit far away looking at it in my browser…. here’s a closer photo:

And, yes, I cut it quickly and threw on some BLO without sanding or clean up. I’m just expirementing with the technique. But despite the rough treatment, it looks pretty nice from a distance, I’m impressed with this method.

-- Todd

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