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David Marks Tour #2: David Marks Gallery Tour

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Blog entry by thewoodwhisperer posted 01-19-2009 06:17 PM 1845 reads 1 time favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: David Marks Shop Tour Part 2 of David Marks Tour series Part 3: David Marks Project in Progress »


David Marks finishes up his tour with a review of his wood boiling apparatus (used for drying out turnings), and his art gallery. The gallery contains many beautiful pieces by David as well as other amazing woodworkers. David caps off the tour by showing us his skills on the drums! And believe it or not, we have a few outtakes!

Also, David recently released his Scrapers DVD. It contains everything you need to know to properly sharpen card scrapers, cabinet scrapers, and gooseneck scrapers. I watched this for the first time a few weeks ago and I instantly felt like I was watching a new episode of Woodworks (only more REAL!) You can pick the DVD up here.

-- For free video tutorials and other cool woodworking stuff, check out http://www.TheWoodWhisperer.com



23 comments so far

View Rob's profile

Rob

43 posts in 2086 days


#1 posted 01-19-2009 07:23 PM

Great interview and that really opened my eyes on everything you can possibly create with a lathe!

Hmmmmm, craigslist, here I come.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2752 days


#2 posted 01-19-2009 07:29 PM

Thanks for posting the second half of David’s shop tour. I have been waiting anxiously for this.

Great Stuff!

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2243 days


#3 posted 01-19-2009 09:43 PM

Thanks for posting this. I have to say that I was a little disappointed with what he had available to show, but I can understand being a famous artist that most of the pieces would be sold. At any rate I’m a huge fan of his and am inspired to challenge myself artistically and think more outside the box. Hopefully one day I will get to meet him.

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View GuyK's profile

GuyK

356 posts in 2732 days


#4 posted 01-19-2009 09:57 PM

Marc, as always, fantastic. Thanks again for the video. One thing in the future I would love to see is his stash of wood that he mentioned.

-- Guy Kroll www.thelandsathillsidefarms.org

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2452 days


#5 posted 01-20-2009 02:28 AM

loved the video.. I miss his show. this was fantastic.. Thanks!

-- making sawdust....

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 2980 days


#6 posted 01-20-2009 03:12 AM

great vid! great tour!
now I just need to get a little more info on boiling ones turnings.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

3474 posts in 2180 days


#7 posted 01-20-2009 03:47 AM

Thanks for that, have not seen others, but very cool. Have not heard of the alcohol or boiling before. Great info for us newbies. Fantastic art designs, great works!

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13341 posts in 2326 days


#8 posted 01-20-2009 04:44 AM

Nice video!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2644 days


#9 posted 01-20-2009 04:59 AM

Marc,

Thanks for posting these; I have admired his work for quite some time.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View thewoodwhisperer's profile

thewoodwhisperer

601 posts in 2837 days


#10 posted 01-20-2009 05:01 AM

The whole thing with the drying process has to do with plant cell walls, as i understand it. The cells tend to retain moisture in a green blank. By boiling the blank (or submerging it in alcohol), we rupture the cell walls which causes them to release their moisture. And although the blank comes out of the boiling water completely water-logged, it will quickly reach a drier state than before the boil. The same thing happens (only much faster) in the microwave. But its very important to let the blank dry slowly. I think David mentioned that he coats it in wax to help prevent cracks.

-- For free video tutorials and other cool woodworking stuff, check out http://www.TheWoodWhisperer.com

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2644 days


#11 posted 01-20-2009 05:15 AM

Marc,

In the video he first said wax then green wood preserver. Same idea different term or altogether different?

Thanks….

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View thewoodwhisperer's profile

thewoodwhisperer

601 posts in 2837 days


#12 posted 01-20-2009 05:34 AM

The wax I assume is Anchorseal, which is basically liquid wax in a can. “Green wood preserver” is pretty generic. Maybe Pentacryl? Someone more experienced in the world of turning might know what specific product he is referring to. Either way, the concept is the same. Something that slows down the loss of moisture.

-- For free video tutorials and other cool woodworking stuff, check out http://www.TheWoodWhisperer.com

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

3474 posts in 2180 days


#13 posted 01-20-2009 07:08 AM

So how do you know when it’s properly dry? If it’s coated in wax how does the moisture escape?

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

View thewoodwhisperer's profile

thewoodwhisperer

601 posts in 2837 days


#14 posted 01-20-2009 07:34 AM

The wax doesn’t completely block moisture from escaping, it just slows it down. As for the length of time, I honestly have no idea. For the boiled blanks, it shouldn’t take too long at all. For a blank that has not been boiled or treated in any way, it would take significantly longer. Again, not being much of a turner, I don’t have rule of thumb answers for you.

But I know many people like to do partial turnings. If the wood is too wet to go all the way to the final shape, they take it off the lathe and either seal it with wax, or put it in a bucket of wood shavings (or even a brown paper bag). And this will allow it to slowly lose its remaining moisture. By the time its dry, the partially-turned blank is quite warped, and you can see exactly why you wouldn’t want to turn it all the way.

Where are the turning experts out there? :) Do you use a moisture meter or do you have set time-frames?

-- For free video tutorials and other cool woodworking stuff, check out http://www.TheWoodWhisperer.com

View PKP's profile

PKP

94 posts in 2099 days


#15 posted 01-20-2009 10:39 PM

He can still Rock the drums! Great Video thanks for sharing.

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