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woodworking tools for sale #1: Looking for tools and advice

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Blog entry by thatlabguy posted 505 days ago 1187 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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ADVICE NEEDED:
I am making some end tables for a retail outlet back east. The problem I am having is the tops coming loose in transit.
Someone suggested using screws where the threads go only into the top and not both top and table post itself. Another suggestion was to use an impact driver as well.
Any suggestions or input welcomed.

Also, I am looking for woodworking power tools. If you are upgrading or retiring please let me know what you have that you are looking to sell.

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com



8 comments so far

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6163 posts in 1427 days


#1 posted 505 days ago

Can you give us a photo of the end tables in question?

I assume that the tops are solid panels or for some other reason you don’t want to glue them?

How far do the screws extend into the top?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1319 days


#2 posted 505 days ago

You can see photos under my projects. The tops are 2” thick and are also Juniper. Never thought about gluing them. The tops vary in size as you see in pics. The screws probably go into tops about 1-1.5”.
One guy has told me that I should avoid having the threads in the top as well as the posts as it will never tighten as much.

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6163 posts in 1427 days


#3 posted 505 days ago

Is this the one you are talking about? If it is, I don’t think glue will help because you are attaching the top to the end grain of the log post. End grain doesn’t glue well. I would go with the guy’s screw idea, though I don’t see how you are using screws from the photos.

I would also consider using loose tenons. What I mean is, drill a couple of holes into the top of the post and glue a couple of dowels in them to create a pair of tenons. Then you can drill holes in the underside of the top (though not all the way through) for the ends of the dowels to go in. Use glue to secure it. Use the largest diameter dowels as you can and still be able to get at least two on top of the post. Actually, more than two would be better, but more difficult to line up. You could make a template to help. Just be sure you are drilling straight up and down into the post top.

Glue will hold really well with tenons. You wouldn’t even need screws. Of course, I may be envisioning this wrong since I can’t see the underside of the table.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View pwalter's profile

pwalter

77 posts in 1211 days


#4 posted 505 days ago

I agree with stumy. Dowels are probably the strongest joint you van easily use. Beautiful tables by the way

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1319 days


#5 posted 505 days ago

Yes, all of my end tables use a Juniper slab for the top and then an open grain post to attach to. I never thought of using dowells/tenons but, I think that it is a great idea. Some of the post tops may not work very well as I don’t always have much to work with but, between using better screws, not leaving threads in the post and the top will help. I am also going to use some 5 minute epoxy as well to fill in any uneaven spots but, I think the dowel idea is the best so far and should create a very strong bond that won’t slip in transit. thanks guys,

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1319 days


#6 posted 505 days ago

Oh, I do use screws up underneath. I drill in at an angle up into the top. It has worked out alright until I started shipping them cross country.
In other words, I’ve been getting away with it but, it isn’t the best fit. I really like the dowel idea as it will eliminate some of the screws I have had to use which means less holes I have to hide.

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View Robb's profile

Robb

660 posts in 2561 days


#7 posted 504 days ago

Just to carry Stumpy’s suggestion a bit further – you could incorporate a cross-shaped piece at the top of the post, either dadoed in, or attached with dowels to the post. That would give you more room to dowel to the top, and a broader support for the top. If the outer edges of the cross-piece were tapered, they wouldn’t be highly visible from a customer standpoint.

Alternately, you could make the top of the post into a tenon, and attach the top that way. With jigs, that might not be too bad, although you’re working with natural, non-square material, which might make jigs a challenge.

Just some thoughts.

-- Robb

View camps764's profile

camps764

786 posts in 987 days


#8 posted 504 days ago

I used the screw idea on my dining room table and it has done fairly well – I drill the hole in the skirt over sized so the screw slides through with no catch. The pilot into the table top allows the screw to bite. The over sized hole gives plenty of room for seasonal movement, but the top doesn’t wiggle around at all.

Have you considered using the screw idea, but leaving the tops unattached for shipping? You could include a small instruction sheet and a baggy of screws so they could assemble the top on site. Don’t know if your client would go for it or not.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

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