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wood round backless bar stool seat diameter

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Blog entry by thatlabguy posted 1193 days ago 5407 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

can anyone tell me what the typical diameter is for a round wooden bar stool is? I am making some from Juniper but, am not sure how large to make the seat itself.

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com



11 comments so far

View skippyland's profile

skippyland

158 posts in 1319 days


#1 posted 1193 days ago

Hey Larry. Restaurant equipment and supplies are my day job (for the last 40+ years). The seat diameter will vary anywhere from 14-16”. Seat height for bar stools (not counter stools) are approx. 29-31” to the floor.

-- Skip from Batavia, purveyor of fine and exotic sawdust & chips.

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1320 days


#2 posted 1193 days ago

thanks for the info. The husband of the gal who has asked me to make 4 bar stools for her is 6’2”/260lbs. so I wanted to be sure I made one big enough for him,

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1320 days


#3 posted 1193 days ago

Thanks Lee, I will take pictures all along the way. The guy helping me wants heartwood only (from Juniper) with no knots. Hard to find heartwood with zero knots. I am using some of my “not so good” mantel wood to cut the legs from.

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1320 days


#4 posted 1193 days ago

myy big fear is finding the right Juniper rounds that are solid enough to use for the seats,

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View HerbC's profile (online now)

HerbC

1161 posts in 1487 days


#5 posted 1192 days ago

Larry,

If by rounds you mean slabs cut perpendicular to the grain of the log (also known as cookies), I’d recommend that you not use that configuration for your stool seats. In that configuration the grain runs through the thickness and is much weaker than when the grain run parallel to the seat surface. Also “cookies” will almost always crack as they dry.

Good Luck. I look forward to following this project to completion.

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1320 days


#6 posted 1192 days ago

OK, if I don’t use rounds (cookies), do you recommend I cut parrallel to the log and then cut slices and glue them together or, do you recommend I cut slabs then cut the cookies from that?

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1515 days


#7 posted 1192 days ago

Hi Larry.

For future reference, here’s a web site that has all the usual dimensions of furniture for designers.

http://www.woodbin.com/ref/furniture/index.htm

Hope you find it useful.

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1320 days


#8 posted 1191 days ago

thanks for the info. Ok, this is a dumb question but, how do I change the pictures I have displayed in my projects section?

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View Elksniffer's profile

Elksniffer

74 posts in 2025 days


#9 posted 1191 days ago

Hi Larry
I would agree you should not cut cookies for the seat. I have made a couple of short stools, about 24”, and the seat diameter is about 12.5”. Are you going to angle the legs? Turned legs? Mortise and Tenon.
To small a diameter seat and angled legs might make a stool hard to get on and off without hitting the legs. Might also consider the moisture content on the wood if you slab it from logs and how long you have to wait for it to dry.
Can’t help on the pictures

View thatlabguy's profile

thatlabguy

84 posts in 1320 days


#10 posted 1187 days ago

Yes, the legs are being turned and angled with Mortise/Tenon. The legs are just shy of 28” with a 15”/2” thick round seat cut from juniper slabs. I cut the slabs yesterday and will begin cutting the seats and placing them on the legs later this week. I have more moisture content than I would like so we are working to get the seats placed on the legs as quickly as possible and then we will just have to work with what happens next. I know I will have some epoxy work on the seats as I have some rot spots in the some of the seats but, I can add local moss, quartz pieces and other “decorations” such as deer/elk droppings and/or Juniper berries just for fun…maybe even a scorpion or two,

-- larry@juniperworksnaturally.com

View Elksniffer's profile

Elksniffer

74 posts in 2025 days


#11 posted 1186 days ago

Hi Larry:
Sounds like the plans are progressing. I might be a little concerned about moisture and trying to cut the seat blanks right away. If you are a lab guy do you have access to a good scale? Cut a small piece of your slab form the center, say two inches square, get a green weight and then either microwave it slowly(30 second intervals maybe a couple of minutes apart) or place it oven at low heat and record weights until it stops losing moisture. I would guess if you are over 15% you might have cupping or warping of your seat blanks, then the angle of your legs will be different leg to leg. Your tenons will shrink and result in loose legs. Tenons going all the way through seat blank? Wish I had access to juniper that size in SW Montana. Can you post a picture of the slabs?

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