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Room Furniture Series. #5: update

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Blog entry by teenagewoodworker posted 06-11-2008 01:30 AM 796 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Design 2 Part 5 of Room Furniture Series. series Part 6: well we're back on track »

haven’t written in at least a month on this topic so i figured i would write quickly with a quick update. right now i am just pricing the project out. as you know i don’t have a car so i have to rely on my parents to get me to all the different lumberyards so i can price up the piece. we’ve been busy this week so no luck getting to the lumberyards. well aright thats it for now. have a nice week everyone.



7 comments so far

View acanthuscarver's profile

acanthuscarver

268 posts in 3174 days


#1 posted 06-11-2008 02:03 AM

There’s a couple of small problems with your theory. First, the $8.50 for the 12/4 is per board foot. If you buy it and resaw it into 4/4 boards, you’ll have paid $25.50 for 3 board feet. That’s assuming you don’t have a strange lumber yard that charges by the lineal foot for hardwoods.

Second, resawing 12/4 into 4/4 boards can cause a lot of wood movement if the wood is not perfectly dried and stable. The outer surfaces are usually dryer than the interior of the board. When you resaw off the first 4/4 board, you have one exterior surface and one interior. The interior surface is going to begin releasing or absorbing moisture like made to reach equalibrium with the surrounding environment. The exterior surface is already at equalibrium and isn’t going to move as much. The result…cupping and warping. You can help the process by immediately stacking and stickering the resawn lumber, then putting weight on top of the pile to keep it flat but you still haven’t overcome the extra cost for the 12/4 and there’s still no guarantee that the boards will be flat in the end.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

-- Chuck Bender, 360 WoodWorking, period furniture maker, woodworking instructor

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#2 posted 06-11-2008 02:12 AM

Personally, I’d stay with the 4/4 lumber. One thing you have to remember when you buy rough lumber is the time it takes to dress it. Your time is worth a lot, no matter your age or skill level. Don’t price your work just on the cost of the lumber.

Also, don’t get stuck in the rut of pricing low “because I’m just a kid” or “I’m still learning” or “this is for a friend.”

Do yourself a favor and charge appropriately for your time.

Ok – that was a tangent——still would stay with the 4/4.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3230 days


#3 posted 06-11-2008 02:16 AM

alright. i totally forgot that 12/4 would be 3 bf. ya i guess 4/4 it is then.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#4 posted 06-11-2008 02:20 AM

I completely agree with Chuck and that was exactly what went through my mind as I read your question.

Betsy is also completely right.

Here’s my extra thought; you will never get 3 full strips of 4/4 thickness out of 12/4. You will always lose too much in the resawing process. The thickness of the blade and the wandering blade will eat up too much.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View acanthuscarver's profile

acanthuscarver

268 posts in 3174 days


#5 posted 06-11-2008 02:27 AM

I wasn’t even going to get into the loss of material to the saw kerf. I figured the thought of over-paying for 4/4 lumber (12/4 resawn) would be enough to stop our young friend from buying the 12/4. If that didn’t work, the realisim of warped boards should have. Betsy is right. The best way to price out the project is to figure the cost of the lumber plus something for your parents’ gas, you time and theirs’ to get you to and from the lumber yard and then start charging for your labor on the project. Don’t forget to add a little profit to the cost of the lumber. Price the materials based on the next project you want to make out walnut. I never price a project based on what I paid for the wood. I base it on what I expect to pay next time I head to the sawmill. This way, I am not selling off 100 bdft of material I paid $6 for and only being able to go to the sawmill and buy 90 bdft with that $600. Make sense?

-- Chuck Bender, 360 WoodWorking, period furniture maker, woodworking instructor

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3230 days


#6 posted 06-11-2008 02:46 AM

ya this project is for my parents though and for me. its for my room but their paying for it because they cant find anything decent that they can afford so I’m only charging for materials. they helped to buy the dovetail jig i wanted to so thats my pay for this project. its really for me a chance to get experience and as long as i’m not losing any money i’m fine. they would pay labor but then this project would be a LOT more because of how complex and nice i am making it. it is for me though and i will have this for the rest of my life probably so i want to do it right and make it nice. i have been buying pine lately because i have just been practicing so i totally forgot about 12/4 is 3 bf. i should be able to keep it under 1000 though. thanks for the advice everyone.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#7 posted 06-11-2008 04:24 AM

Good luck with it. Sounds like you’ve made a nice compromise with your parents. They sound incredibly supportive of your addiction to woodworking!

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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