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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #90: Thickness Planer Cart Build

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Blog entry by technoslick posted 12-04-2016 01:10 AM 642 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 89: Breathing is Optional on a Good Day in the Dungeon Part 90 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 91: Current Project: Heavy Duty Plant Stand »

In at least one of my previous posts you will find the DeWALT 734 thickness planer sitting atop a smaller bench in the background. This was a major step up (no pun intended!) from the floor dolly it was sitting on. But it had two drawbacks that I couldn’t accent any longer. The first is I had to turn it at angle in relation to the bench top every time I wanted to use it, so the outfeed wouldn’t hit the band saw. The bench’s proximity to other benches and equipment limited the length of boards I could feed through it. The second problem was that it was taking up valuable Real Estate for what little time is spent running it. Yesterday I started a shop build that would resolve this problem.

Before starting on this build, I first disassembled the old dolly, reclaiming the Torx-head deck screws, a handle and two of the four casters. Two more casters were purchased at the big box store. Otherwise, this build was all materials owned, recycled or repurposed.

The cart had to fit between the table saw and main work bench and the old Formica laminated top I got from Dad was the perfect size. I turned it upside down on the main bench and buidl the cart from the top down.

Here is the first major assembly point:

I wanted ballast at the bottom to stabilize the 80 lb. planer, so I added two braces to the bottom frame and topped it with 1/2-in. plywood. A handle was placed at each end. A cross brace was added to each end for an additional shelf:

Before going any further, I checked to see if the cart would maneuver around the table saw and benches and fit in the space designated for it:

I found three 3/4-in. pine boards to make the top shelf from. My Sears Craftsman automotive sockets and box wrench set chest is heavy enough to act as ballast. I finally have a place to put it. It was always in the way:

I used the thickness planer to get three boards to the same thickness: about 5/8-in.:

I then jointed the boards on the table saw to ready for glue-up:

Using the heavy tool chest as passive ballast in the glue-up:

Dried glue was scraped off the seams of the top shelf and the ends were squared with a hand saw. I mounted it and we were done:

Being mobile, I can roll this to wherever I want, which when not in use wherever else I am not. Most of my shop construction has revolved around permanence. This is the first roving cart. It may not be the last.



4 comments so far

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2640 posts in 2054 days


#1 posted 12-04-2016 01:38 AM

Nicely done Paul. Every inch of shop space is valuable and it looks as though you are making the best of it.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View technoslick's profile

technoslick

628 posts in 1111 days


#2 posted 12-04-2016 03:12 AM



Nicely done Paul. Every inch of shop space is valuable and it looks as though you are making the best of it.

- luv2learn

Thanks, Lee. Thinning out the unnecessary and consolidating where I can. It’s helping, a lot.

View Woodbutchery's profile

Woodbutchery

341 posts in 3337 days


#3 posted 12-04-2016 05:47 PM

Good build. Simple and versatile. Also, finding a place for heavy stuff that serves a secondary purpose … priceless.

-- Making scrap with zen-like precision - Woodbutchery

View technoslick's profile

technoslick

628 posts in 1111 days


#4 posted 12-04-2016 07:51 PM



Good build. Simple and versatile. Also, finding a place for heavy stuff that serves a secondary purpose … priceless.

- Woodbutchery

Simple and versatile for the shop stuff works well for me. I look forward to getting the shop finished so I can make for other much finer fare. Finding places for things is a major, ongoing frustration. One step to the positive.

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