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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #89: Breathing is Optional on a Good Day in the Dungeon

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Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 12-01-2016 01:37 PM 1634 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 88: Moving the Furniture...Again, or: Down to One Table Saw and Making it Count Part 89 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 90: Thickness Planer Cart Build »

Note to self: “Wear the mask! Wear the mask! Wear the mask!”

Yes, a blatant rip-off of the scene in the movie Armageddon, when the amateur stargazer screams at his wife Betty to “Get the book! Get the book! Get the book!”

I spent quite a few hours in the dungeon workshop yesterday without a mask on. I went to bed with a dry, rasped throat and woke up with the same, plus sinus congestion and a mild headache from the pressure. Popping some meds and wearing a mask today.

Outside of the aforementioned laziness and stupidity, yesterday was a great day in the dungeon. Having finally got the trunnions to work with me on the table saw, I now have blade, miter slots and fence working together nicely. Some practice cuts were so smooth and precise I might have giggled with glee a time or two.

Before that, I decided to put some distance between the saw and main work bench. It was the best organizational decision I’ve made to date. Not only can I work all four sides of the bench, something I couldn’t do and complained about before, I can not slip a cart on wheels into the space, sporting my thickness planer with it’s entrance and exit leaves just clearing the tops of the saw and bench. I’ll be able to plane longer boards than ever before with ample support. Long rips will be easier, too, as one or both of my roller stands makes the outfeed act like it was self-propelled.

No less important is the feeling of spaciousness in the central work space. Lesser can be bigger.

Other things accomplished…

I turned a replacement handle for the Hitachi. Several months ago the poorly designed rubber handle tore from the mounting bolt on the blade height adjustment wheel. The angle adjustment isn’t used nearly as often, so I swapped handles.

I found another good use for an empty IKEA bag: scroll saw cover. After all the work I put into refurbing it, no way was I going to let it get dungeonized any time soon.

-- -- Paul @ PMB Creative Works



7 comments so far

View bhuvi's profile

bhuvi

97 posts in 506 days


#1 posted 12-01-2016 01:46 PM

-- Do NOT click links. Spammer in the process of being removed.

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2754 posts in 2267 days


#2 posted 12-01-2016 04:46 PM

Thanks for reminding me about wearing a mask. I have had the same experience as you after spending a day in the shop without one.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

4308 posts in 2231 days


#3 posted 12-01-2016 05:54 PM

I can NOT STAND to wear a mask. BUT, I do have an elaborate==(EXPENSIVE) dust system, that almost works.

A Jet roof mount fan/filter + a BIG (Takes up way to much room) Laguana 220 volt unit, + a few scattered designated shop vacs as well. Sometime 4 dust collector units are running at the same time. Mostly works, NOISY then. I do wear the ear muffs almost steady in the shop.

It does fairly well; I do not think it is possible to collect all the dust in a working wood shop.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

641 posts in 1324 days


#4 posted 12-01-2016 07:11 PM



Thanks for reminding me about wearing a mask. I have had the same experience as you after spending a day in the shop without one.

- luv2learn

I’ve made some improvements with dust collection (a new Rigid shop vac for the table saw and a separate one for other power tools) but even if I hand cut or sand I create saw dust and that seems to be enough to cause problems for me. Plus the mold and mildew in the wood, floor and all around. My allergies are severe enough I shouldn’t work down there without one.

-- -- Paul @ PMB Creative Works

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

641 posts in 1324 days


#5 posted 12-01-2016 07:19 PM



I can NOT STAND to wear a mask. BUT, I do have an elaborate==(EXPENSIVE) dust system, that almost works.

A Jet roof mount fan/filter + a BIG (Takes up way to much room) Laguana 220 volt unit, + a few scattered designated shop vacs as well. Sometime 4 dust collector units are running at the same time. Mostly works, NOISY then. I do wear the ear muffs almost steady in the shop.

It does fairly well; I do not think it is possible to collect all the dust in a working wood shop.

- ralbuck

I don’t believe it is possible, either. And to retain what heat I can without adding it, I have the dungeon sealed off from outside airflow coming in, so the windows 270 cfm fan can’t be used right now. My allergies add insult to injury. Even if I put in a true dust collector the cement floor is crumbling as I walk over it. Every time someone walks on the first floor it sends dust from above. Asbestos..you get the picture. I have on the bucket list to built a wood box enclosure for a room size HEPA air filtering air unit I have. This won’t help while I’m making sawdust, though. So…mask it is!

-- -- Paul @ PMB Creative Works

View jinkyjock's profile

jinkyjock

488 posts in 1539 days


#6 posted 12-02-2016 10:14 AM

Paul,
your post strikes a chord and like most woodworkers at some point we all make compromises re. wearing a dust-mask.
However in your reply you mention the word “Asbestos”, this is a whole different ball-game.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

641 posts in 1324 days


#7 posted 12-02-2016 12:26 PM



Paul,
your post strikes a chord and like most woodworkers at some point we all make compromises re. wearing a dust-mask.
However in your reply you mention the word “Asbestos”, this is a whole different ball-game.

- jinkyjock

Agreed. The overhead water pipes in the dungeon, that carry hot water to the radiators throughout the house, are covered in an asbestos wrap. Many areas are in need of attention. Because of the low ceiling, I occasionally hit the wrapped pipes with what I am working on. Obviously, the proper action is to cover the wrap. The wife and I are hoping to move to a new location in the near future, so I doubt I will take care of the problem before then. Even if I did, allergies to sawdust, concrete dust, mold and mildew would sooner kill me. We do what we need to do to pursue our dreams, the best that we can.

-- -- Paul @ PMB Creative Works

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