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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #73: Tool Acquisition: Dad's saws and set

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Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 06-06-2016 03:01 PM 584 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 72: Harbor Freight 4'x8' Folding Utility Trailer - One Year Anniversary Update Part 73 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 74: Dungeon Workshop: Update Summer 2016, ad nauseum »

My brothers and I are slowly wading through 50+ years worth of valuables and junk in my father’s home. Soon to be 88, he no longer can manage the house and is finding communal living among his peers not as bad as he thought. Most of my dad’s tools are cheap and uninteresting even with time on them. He does have several items that he obviously paid good money for and were worth keeping.

The only item in the group picture that I really didn’t need was the Stanley “Hard Tooth Saw” back saw. I have a new one with the same hardened teeth and as you know these are cheap to buy new and plentiful.

I wanted a tooth set, so that was a welcome surprise. No branding on the tool. I’m sure someone knows just from having bought one before.

The hand saw on the left is unmarked, so I am guessing it was an inexpensive box store choice. As far as I can tell (with not-great eyesight and some test cuts with and against the grain on soft pine) the teeth are formed for ripping. I was surprised at how well it cut after years of neglect and probably never having been sharpened since purchase. If this is a rip saw, I’m quite happy. Can’t buy these new in my neck of the woods.

The hand saw on the right is a Swedish made saw. I haven’t taken a magnifying lens to the teeth, but again the saw seems to do better in ripping than cross-cutting and the teeth appear to me to be chisel-shaped.

I did notice a tooth pattern I am not familiar with (which isn’t saying much, really) so I posted a poorly focused close-up of the pattern. Look to the left and notice the stepped tooth pattern in the first two pairs. Is this something worth noting?

The rusty looking bow saw blade on the right I think is for pruning tree limbs. Since the surface rust isn’t very deep I may keep it.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



4 comments so far

View AgentTwitch's profile

AgentTwitch

525 posts in 2956 days


#1 posted 06-06-2016 07:34 PM

The saw set looks an awful lot like a Stanley Defiance saw set. The saw tooth geometry is fairly common in new budget minded saws of today. It allows for easy start of the cut and cuts on both the pull and push stroke. The downside is that its not very aggressive and can take a while to finish a cut. The difference in saw gullet size is likely from the steep angle of the file stroke on alternating sides of the saw plate.

-- Regards, Norm

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2794 days


#2 posted 06-07-2016 11:04 AM

Great that you got some useful items there. It probably won’t be too long before my tools will be going to my kids/grandkids. I kind of envy them since it has taken me 20 years to acquire a full range of machines and hand tools and most are pretty good quality. I just hope they will be interested enough to actually use them. I have spent time with the grandkids over the years preparing the way, but unfortunately their dads don’t seem that keen on woodworking.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#3 posted 08-25-2016 05:42 PM


The saw set looks an awful lot like a Stanley Defiance saw set. The saw tooth geometry is fairly common in new budget minded saws of today. It allows for easy start of the cut and cuts on both the pull and push stroke. The downside is that its not very aggressive and can take a while to finish a cut. The difference in saw gullet size is likely from the steep angle of the file stroke on alternating sides of the saw plate.

- AgentTwitch

Norm, when you say ‘fairly common in new budget minded saws of today’, are you going back to the ‘60s, when my father bought this saw, as modern times? I’ve never seen this tooth pattern. And yes, I have noticed it does aggressively cut. Thanks for the info. Would you recommend reshaping to a traditional pattern?

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#4 posted 08-25-2016 05:45 PM


Great that you got some useful items there. It probably won t be too long before my tools will be going to my kids/grandkids. I kind of envy them since it has taken me 20 years to acquire a full range of machines and hand tools and most are pretty good quality. I just hope they will be interested enough to actually use them. I have spent time with the grandkids over the years preparing the way, but unfortunately their dads don t seem that keen on woodworking.

- stefang

I hear you. My one and only grandkid is only interested in 3D modeling in Minecraft and animation videos. My two daughters haven’t any interest, either. I suspect when I go I’ll expect my wife to sell off what I have. Well, unless I can take it all with me by then. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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