LumberJocks

Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #50: Hitachi C10FL Acquisition

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 08-12-2015 02:56 PM 1082 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 49: Workshop Build - Progress Report Part 50 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 51: Raiders of the Lost Dungeon Workshop -- cont'd »

Last week I picked up a decent deal on a table saw that will be a marked improvement over the one I have in the dungeon workshop right now. It’s a Hitachi C10FL that a widow’s husband bought back in 2009. For those not familiar with the make and model, here is a manufacturer’s marketing image of the machine:

The chassis and legs on my acquisition look almost like brand new. The cast iron top is in need of some TLC and the accessory rails need a good cleaning. When I fired it up at the widow’s garage, in the first split second it spun up with hardly a whisper, then made a wobbly-droning sound. At the time, I thought it was the impacted sawdust I could see from the opening of the dust collection port. Sawdust had caked over every surface within the chassis. The widow verified that she didn’t think her late husband ever hooked up a shop vac to the port. She wasn’t sure if he had a shop vac. I’m guessing: no. We were able to use an old house vac to get most of the sawdust out. Looked like band new in there. She said he hardly used it—never finished the deck he bought it for.

Her advertised price was $200 USD. She was comfortable with accepting $175.00 due to the noise problem. It took three of us to lift the saw sans legs onto the back of the truck. Because of the angle of their driveway, the tailgate was above my waist. I’m thankful I had the help to keep my back from spasming over lifting so much weight to that height.

Once home, the wife and I went South (with the Blazer) to a Harbor Freight store to pickup a hydraulic table lift. Only one left, and with the store sale and 20% off coupon, I got it for half the normal price. The only problem—and I anticipated this would happen—is that the small casters won’t glide over the crusher run driveway surface. I have to think of some way to get it to the back entrance. But that’s a later-on First World problem for now.

So what does it look like? Right now, in pieces, uncleaned:

Here’s one that shows the condition of the cast iron top. It looks worse than it is. As far as I could tell, no pitting. It should clean up well:

So you ask, what’s taking so long for me to get it together and into the dungeon? Parts. Remember earlier I mentioned the wobbly sound after startup? When I inspected the underside of the chassis I found that the pulley on the motor shaft was able to slide around on the shaft. The set screw for the pulley is missing. Fortunately, eReplacementparts.com has them in stock for a little over a buck a piece. While I was ordering, I decided to pick up two rubber feet that were missing from the stand and the outer safety switch paddle, which was also missing. A total of ten bucks. The package will arrive late today or tomorrow morning.

Now for the ‘it’s complicated’ part. As well having to figure out how to get the hydraulic cart with 260 pounds of table saw across a basically dirt and rock driveway, I have to devise a set of ramps, and a safe means of lowering said cart, down the stone steps into the dungeon. I have ideas that should work for the steps. But you know how it is: everything is ‘complicated’ when the dungeon is involved.

I’ll post follow-up picks when the saw is installed. Or maybe when the ramps are in. Or maybe the crash once we let it loose down the ramps. ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



12 comments so far

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 526 days


#1 posted 08-12-2015 11:14 PM

Sweet as! I like it when good things happen for nice people.

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#2 posted 08-12-2015 11:23 PM

I hope you enjoy your new tool. I have that saw, and it’s done me well. It does have nylon gears for raising, angle adjustment, so keep an eye on them. Plywood overlapped the same way will get you over the gravel, the stairs will probably require a belaying line. Good Luck!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#3 posted 08-12-2015 11:28 PM



Sweet as! I like it when good things happen for nice people.

- Ted Ewen

Thanks, Ted. This is probably the last ‘big ticket’ expenditure for the year. It’s time to make the donuts. I have to pay for all of this somehow.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#4 posted 08-12-2015 11:36 PM


I hope you enjoy your new tool.

Thanks. It has to be better than what I have now.


I have that saw, and it s done me well. It does have nylon gears for raising, angle adjustment, so keep an eye on them.

I was aware of the nylon gears, having researched the saw before going to see it. What causes them to go back? Constant up and down cranking of the blade? Not keeping them lubed and/or clean? Does anyone make metal replacements for them? Any tips you have on keeping this running safe and accurate are greatly appreciated.

One concern I have is the splitter. Even my cheap one has a riving knife. Any issues with it?

And how about the fence? Some have complained about it being sloppy/inaccurate. It took a while, but I finally got my old saw’s fence to work well. The Hitachi’s looks to be beefier than the Skilsaw’s.


Plywood overlapped the same way will get you over the gravel, the stairs will probably require a belaying line.

I didn’t think of plywood. Not sure I have enough scraps, but maybe Dad down the street does. Excellent idea!

I have some ropes and other gear that might help in getting down the ramp over the steps. I will need to get the help of the young stud who lives next door. Oh, to be young again. :)


Good Luck!

- nailbanger2

Appreciated.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 855 days


#5 posted 08-18-2015 06:10 PM

Nice haul, Paul!

You will really enjoy using that saw!

I don’t envy you in your endeavors to get it down to the dungeon. It is nice to have strapping young neighbors to help.
Most of them will work for pizza!

This is another of the many reasons why I have migrated over to hand tools – lots easier to haul up and down the stairs!

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#6 posted 08-18-2015 06:31 PM


Nice haul, Paul!

Thanks, Ed.


You will really enjoy using that saw!

If I ever get it off its backside and onto its feet…


I don t envy you in your endeavors to get it down to the dungeon. It is nice to have strapping young neighbors to help.

Most of them will work for pizza!

I ended up getting into the dungeon with the help of my wife and applied mechanics (otherwise known as ‘trying not to do anything stupid’.) I have the feet back on, but now it’s too heavy for me to lift and tip back up. Waiting for the young stud next door to come over from work. :)


This is another of the many reasons why I have migrated over to hand tools – lots easier to haul up and down the stairs!

- handsawgeek

Tell me about it. >_>

If I didn’t need to run a business from the woodworking, I would have opted to go totally hand tools and take my time getting to where I want to be. Alas, the economy beckons, and my poor body must answer the call.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 855 days


#7 posted 08-19-2015 01:05 PM

I hear ya… If I did my woodworking as a business venture, I, too, would be solely given over to sacrificing innocent electrons!

Keep us posted on your progress!

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#8 posted 08-19-2015 01:22 PM


I hear ya… If I did my woodworking as a business venture, I, too, would be solely given over to sacrificing innocent electrons!

Heh. If electrons had feeling I would be hated by many!


Keep us posted on your progress!

- handsawgeek

I will, Ed. Thanks.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#9 posted 08-20-2015 03:56 AM

Paul, sorry you aren’t up and running yet. As far as the gears, I don’t have a dust collector , so I left the back off of the machine. I use a shopvac often, and anytime I have to change the angle or height a lot, I make sure they are dust free. The most annoying thing to me about the fence is the “whale’s tail” at the end of it. I use a thin strip jig quite often, and when the board gets too narrow, the tail interferes with the operation. I have often thought of cutting the inboard side off. Don’t get me wrong, the whole fence is troublesome, but I solved most of the problems with a homemade add on square to the table. And a Wixey digital angle gauge helps a lot.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 526 days


#10 posted 08-20-2015 09:46 AM

... I, too, would be solely given over to sacrificing innocent electrons!

Heh. If electrons had feeling I would be hated by many!

Electrons hate everybody – they are a wholly negative bunch!

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#11 posted 08-20-2015 10:55 AM


Paul, sorry you aren t up and running yet. As far as the gears, I don t have a dust collector , so I left the back off of the machine. I use a shopvac often, and anytime I have to change the angle or height a lot, I make sure they are dust free.

Thanks, but no worries. I’ve had micro-catastrophes along the way. Yesterday I got back into the project. Later today I will post update pictures of my progress.

I’m hoping the shop vac hookup will keep the gears enough to where I won’t have to take the back panel off a lot for cleaning.


The most annoying thing to me about the fence is the “whale s tail” at the end of it. I use a thin strip jig quite often, and when the board gets too narrow, the tail interferes with the operation. I have often thought of cutting the inboard side off. Don t get me wrong, the whole fence is troublesome, but I solved most of the problems with a homemade add on square to the table. And a Wixey digital angle gauge helps a lot.

- nailbanger2

I haven’t gotten that far to experience the annoyance. An after-market fence is well beyond my current budget and I don’t have the skill set or tools to make a better one, as yet. If I have to make an inner fence jig, that’s fine. It can’t be any worse than the Skilsaw fence on my other saw. I have hours into getting that to work well.

Thanks for the experience and tips. Appreciated!

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

619 posts in 819 days


#12 posted 08-20-2015 10:55 AM


Electrons hate everybody – they are a wholly negative bunch!

- Ted Ewen

That they do. That they are. ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com