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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #49: Workshop Build - Progress Report

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Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 08-10-2015 02:15 AM 1121 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 48: Portable Base for DeWALT Thickness Planer Part 49 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 50: Hitachi C10FL Acquisition »

The past few weeks have been filled with side-tracks, accomplishments, frustrations and turmoil. Today I finally reached that point where I could expand into the area of the dungeon that used to be the bike shop.

I removed the peg board from the field stone side.

The right corner of the metal shelving was so rusty that some bolts fused with the shelves. I expected to discard both shelf units once I got into them.

This door hasn’t been opened in over 25 years. The camera couldn’t capture the cobwebs that completely cover the opening. It’s pretty dank in there, too. I don’t think this space will be used for finishing work. Storage maybe.

Tomorrow…the other shelf unit.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



14 comments so far

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 529 days


#1 posted 08-10-2015 08:09 AM

Oh go on, do the finishing work in there. It puts the varnish on the wood or it gets the hose.
I see why you call it the dungeon ;)

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#2 posted 08-10-2015 11:54 AM


Oh go on, do the finishing work in there. It puts the varnish on the wood or it gets the hose.

Sure, sure. :D


I see why you call it the dungeon ;)

- Ted Ewen

I have a 10” 270 cfm window-mounted fan running night and day to remove as much of the humidity as can be drawn out. It helps some. However, with all that mold, mildew and mortar dust being swept up and vacuumed, several hours later I found the space difficult to breathe in. The odor was obvious. I haven’t ventured down this morning to see/smell.

As for the little room…

The floor space is covered with rotted, moldy paper and what-have-you litter. It was build by a previous owner to be a photography darkroom. I would need to remove the shelving in there, which has collapsed on the end I can see through the opening, and even then I don’t think it would give me enough room to work in there. That isn’t a disappointment, because as a walk-in storage closet it would greatly remove the clutter and organize my supplies, which are now at the other end and causing a real mess.

The place is aptly named. It just may be possible that when I finally finish hitting every corner of the cellar I will have to drop the ‘dungeon’ title. ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2462 posts in 1765 days


#3 posted 08-10-2015 03:36 PM

Paul, are you going to take the doors down? It looks like there is some good salvageable material in them. Progress, progress my friend!!

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#4 posted 08-10-2015 08:03 PM



Paul, are you going to take the doors down? It looks like there is some good salvageable material in them. Progress, progress my friend!!

- luv2learn

Lee, I don’t know yet what I am going to do with this room. The worse case scenario is that it is so damp and mildewy in there that I close the door back up and use the room as a back wall for a wide bench. If I can use the room, it may be advantageous to leave the door on, to keep what’s inside as dust free as possible. On the other hand, removing the door makes access easier and doesn’t force me to limit what I place against the wall on the back side of the opened door. Once I get in there I can figure something out.

Progress. I guess. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#5 posted 08-10-2015 08:57 PM

Hey, Paul,
Have you considered taking the whole kit and kaboodle out and just expanding the available amount of floor space? Looks like the wood that makes up the door and shelves would suit a nice ‘rustic’ project. That would also relieve the mustiness from that corner of the room.

You wrote: Progress. I guess. :)

That reminds me of a line from the comedian Galliger:

“If ‘con’ is the opposite of ‘pro’, then that means ‘CON-gress is the opposite of PRO-gress!”

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#6 posted 08-10-2015 09:10 PM


Hey, Paul,
Have you considered taking the whole kit and kaboodle out and just expanding the available amount of floor space?

As of ten minutes ago: Yes. That’s when I went down there for the first time today, did some measuring, and noticed that behind the remaining shelf unit is a window. That’s not going to work for me.


Looks like the wood that makes up the door and shelves would suit a nice rustic project.

It might at that. :)


That would also relieve the mustiness from that corner of the room.

I’m sure it would.


You wrote: Progress. I guess. :)

That reminds me of a line from the comedian Galliger:

“If con is the opposite of pro , then that means CON-gress is the opposite of PRO-gress!”

- handsawgeek

Funny, Ed. No, really. :D

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#7 posted 08-10-2015 09:23 PM

Dag-gone windows…always getting’ in the dang way !!!

I’m sure you’ll find a very workable, pleasing solution to this conundrum.

As for me, I have to put woodshop work on hold one more time….I’ve had a loose trex step on my outside deck stairway for some time, so I went out yesterday with a drill/driver and some screws to fix it, only to find that the riser supports were dry rotted! Another big home maintenance project to deal with…..

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#8 posted 08-10-2015 09:30 PM

Ouch, Ed! I’ve got some outdoor ass-aches to deal with, too, before the cold sets in. I wonder how I am going to make the deadline.

Doesn’t it feel like insult to injury that just when you finally address a problem you can fix, the problem is found to be much bigger than you ever thought? I’m sure there is a law for this, you know, like Murphy’s. >_>

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 529 days


#9 posted 08-11-2015 07:02 AM

I call it the Law of Conservation of Perversity, Paul.
Given a choice the universe will always choose the more perverse outcome – just to fook with us.

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View jinkyjock's profile

jinkyjock

487 posts in 1037 days


#10 posted 08-11-2015 10:08 AM

Paul,
WOW, a (mini)Dungeon within your Dungeon.
I tend to think handsawgeek might be on to something in opening up the space.
The right-hand wall with the extra space would be ideal for a bench or Mitre-saw station with storage beneath.
And this would still leave room for more storage options in the remaining space.
As to your mildew, my mother was “Old School” and a stiff scrubbing brush used with bleach was always to hand for just such “Odious” tasks.
If you could you get your hands on a de-humidifier for a few days that might also help.
On the plus side can definitely see your shop taking shape.
Cheers, Jinky (James).

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#11 posted 08-11-2015 11:29 AM


I call it the Law of Conservation of Perversity, Paul.
Given a choice the universe will always choose the more perverse outcome – just to fook with us.

- Ted Ewen

Amen to that. >_>

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#12 posted 08-11-2015 11:47 AM


Paul,
WOW, a (mini)Dungeon within your Dungeon.

I have the best dungeon in these here parts! :D


I tend to think handsawgeek might be on to something in opening up the space.
The right-hand wall with the extra space would be ideal for a bench or Mitre-saw station with storage beneath.
And this would still leave room for more storage options in the remaining space.

I mentioned it to the wife last night, Jinky, and she agrees. It’s been raining since early this morning and looks like it will be an all day affair. Today will be a good day to get at taking the room apart.


As to your mildew, my mother was “Old School” and a stiff scrubbing brush used with bleach was always to hand for just such “Odious” tasks.

“Scrubbing” isn’t an option. It isn’t the wood, per se, that is the major repository for mold and mildew. Certain areas of the stone walls are wet most of the year round. The house is over a hundred years old. When it was built, simplicity and cheapness in building were the priorities. The mortar turns to crumbling powder to the touch. The cost and amount of work to rectify this throughout the dungeon is prohibitive. But then, it is a dungeon, after all. ;)


If you could you get your hands on a de-humidifier for a few days that might also help.

I had a dehumudifier in there last summer and early fall. It worked nicely, except the cost in electricity to run it. In retrospect, I tried to get the humidity level down to a level that wasn’t realistic, so I am sure I caused the cost to be unreasonably high. But to give you an idea of how much moisture I was removing, set to 60% humidity I was removing 10 gallons a day. Eventually, I was down to 5 gallons. It became a daily ritual to switch buckets and empty out the waste. Not fun in the dead of winter. But maybe I can get back to this once the dungeon is cleaned out.


On the plus side can definitely see your shop taking shape.

Cheers, Jinky (James).

Thanks, Jinky. When I look back at where I was at the beginning, I do feel some sense of accomplishment. It’s the pressure to get it done and get into a revenue producing venture as soon as possible that makes it hard to see the progress for what it is. I need three of me…much younger, please.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 529 days


#13 posted 08-11-2015 04:51 PM

I need three of me…much younger, please.

Oh, hell no. I’d never get anything done what with all the stupid I’d have to smack out of not just one but three younger me!

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 822 days


#14 posted 08-11-2015 06:00 PM

Point taken, Ted. I should have said three smart younger versions of me. I’ve made enough trouble already. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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