LumberJocks

Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #48: Portable Base for DeWALT Thickness Planer

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 07-18-2015 05:18 PM 2829 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 47: The Dungeon Workshop: Progress Report & Walk-Through Part 48 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 49: Workshop Build - Progress Report »

If you have been following my previous blog posts, you will recall that in creating an efficient and safe workshop in the dungeon, I’ve had to shift benches and equipment around as areas became ready. I’m at that point where I need to access the South side of the dungeon, and to do that I need to get the heavy thickness planer off its high perch and onto a portable base so I can use it/move it as needed. To that end, I just completed a simple, very sturdy rolling base and now have the planer on it. Hooray! I didn’t lock up my back in moving the planer!

Having the Windsor bench in the middle of the floor has worked out nicely, as this project as proven. The framing started off as reclaimed 1-1/2” x 2-1/2” boards found out back of my neighborhood box store. The outside dimensions are 16” wide by 26” long. This gives extra room around the planer and added some stability. Here you see the dry fit.

Last year I picked up a pocket-hole screw jig at Harbor Freight. It occurred to me that I haven’t tried this kind of joinery and decided this would be good for the inner braces, because of where they are located. I found this easy to use and worked fine; a good value considering how much less it cost me over that of a Kreg.

I started out with mounting an inner side rail into the vise and using a clamp to keep the center brace in place. It worked out well, however….

...I made the mistake of completing the inner framing using the vise instead of the relatively flat/level bench top. The frame ended up a little warped. Nothing that hurt the overall performance, just something I knew better not to do and could have avoided.

Three inch casters and trailing wheels have massive bases. To give four-point contact with the base I used 2×4s across both ends.

I did a little hand planing on the top edges to get rid of unevenness and high spots. I was undecided on whether to add a solid surface to the top of the framing, what material to use if I did (plywood, chip board, planks). In the end I decided not to worry about it.

By balancing the thickness planer on one of the two sawhorses and pushing aside the other, I was able to let gravity help in ‘sliding’ it off and onto the waiting base. The back was saved. Unfortunately, the toes of my left foot were clobbered by the hardwood board that was under the planer on the sawhorses. No blood—just sore toes. Figures.

For now, getting the planer out of the way is all I can worry about. Later on, I plan on adding levelers, since finding a spot on the floor that will meet all four wheels is going to be rare, anyway.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



6 comments so far

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9139 posts in 2331 days


#1 posted 07-18-2015 05:35 PM

It’s so massive, sure will do the job and carry all weight.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1471 days


#2 posted 07-18-2015 05:40 PM

I see no problems with that frame holding the weight, but now when you plane lumber, you’ll be on your knees

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


#3 posted 07-18-2015 06:22 PM


It s so massive, sure will do the job and carry all weight.

- majuvla

I tend to overbuild things, so yeah it should hold a lot more than the weight of the planer.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


#4 posted 07-18-2015 06:27 PM



I see no problems with that frame holding the weight, but now when you plane lumber, you ll be on your knees

- JoeinGa

Right now, this isn’t about convenience in using it. It’s about getting it out of the way as I continue to clean and reclaim space in the dungeon. Also keep in mind that the last time I used this piece of equipment was this past winter. I hope to find a higher location for it once the space is freed up.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 530 days


#5 posted 07-19-2015 08:58 PM

Ok, now move 5 there, 14 there, and 2 over to the left. Now you can move 12, 5 and 9… Also: No project is really a project unless you injure yourself in some minor way – the more embarrassing the better. Glad you avoided paralysing pain :D

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


#6 posted 07-21-2015 10:51 PM


Ok, now move 5 there, 14 there, and 2 over to the left. Now you can move 12, 5 and 9…

A-yep. You got the gist of it.


Also: No project is really a project unless you injure yourself in some minor way – the more embarrassing the better. Glad you avoided paralysing pain :D

- Ted Ewen

Minor injuries are a way of life when you work with your hands. The key is not to lose anything vital. So far, I’ve kept me head attached. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com