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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #32: Milling 30 Year Old Maple Firefoood

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Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 02-19-2015 07:41 PM 1970 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 31: DIY Veritas Powered Sharpening System Part 32 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 33: Soft-head Mallet »

My first video from the Dungeon Workshop. All but the last annotation went M.I.A. I also shouldn’t have allowed the editor to smoothen out the video. Did anyone besides myself get motion sickness from watching this? It sure sucks being a novice.

http://youtu.be/dAQCjAfV0MY

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



10 comments so far

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 861 days


#1 posted 02-19-2015 08:24 PM

Hey, Paul,
Watched the video. Very cool shop space. Looks like the type of place in which one could easily lose track of time.

This may sound weird, but I imagined the opening scene of walking down the short stone corridor and into the shop being set to the music of Bach’s Toccata in Dmin. That’s the scary sounding pipe organ music that’s classically played at Halloween Haunted Hou…..uh…. never mind.

I just finished up doing a marathon read of your blog series. You been busy, Boy!

As I read about all of your tinkering and toying with stuff, a thought crossed my mind –
I must have the other half of your shoestring!

Anyway, enjoyed the vid…and I didn’t get motion sickness.

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 825 days


#2 posted 02-19-2015 08:43 PM



Hey, Paul,
Watched the video. Very cool shop space. Looks like the type of place in which one could easily lose track of time.

Thanks for saying so, Ed. I do lose track of time, but nowhere as much as I want. There’s not place to sit, at the moment, and I have to concentrate to not trick over stuff laying around. I spend so much time looking for things. The lack of good lighting is hard on my eyes at times. These are small concerns I will fix over time. Mostly, I just get overwhelmed with the mess and sometimes it disappoints me to the point of inaction. When the weather warms up and I can bring in some more lumber from destructed pallets, I will get the walls and benches up and then, I think I wouldn’t mind being down there all day. :)


This may sound weird, but I imagined the opening scene of walking down the short stone corridor and into the shop being set to the music of Bach s Toccata in Dmin. That s the scary sounding pipe organ music that s classically played at Halloween Haunted Hou…..uh…. never mind.

Ha! Don’t think I haven’t thought about such music for future videos. ;)


I just finished up doing a marathon read of your blog series. You been busy, Boy!

Really? Wow. Thanks!

I run in spurts. Nap for far too long. :)


As I read about all of your tinkering and toying with stuff, a thought crossed my mind –
I must have the other half of your shoestring!

Heh. If you are as tight as I have to be, I don’t know if I should give you a bro-hug or my sincerest sympathies. ;)

This isn’t my first venture into an expensive interest. With semi-retirement from the computer industry, I have a lot less funds to work with than I would like. My choice, to a point. I just can’t afford a $3,000 table saw and a $900 band saw. Nothing even close. So, let’s see how far I can mature my skills on a half-shoestring budget. It is the man, not the machine, that does the woodworking, right? :)


Anyway, enjoyed the vid…and I didn t get motion sickness.

Thanks again. And I’m glad I didn’t make you get sick. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 861 days


#3 posted 02-19-2015 09:13 PM

Computers, eh…are you hardware, software, or both?

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 825 days


#4 posted 02-19-2015 09:47 PM

Good question, Ed. I would have had a slightly different answer at different points to my near-30 year career. I’d say it started as hardware, migrated into both, ending with software, specifically Linux-base operating systems. The onset of Windows 8/8.1, and where I see Microsoft’s direction, was enough for me to decide to remove technical support for Windows and focus on Linux only. It’s a move I should have followed in ‘95, when I foresaw the future of Linux. Spilt milk, now. I just want to keep a small clientèle and get back to making things with my hands, as any decent tinkerer should. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 861 days


#5 posted 02-19-2015 10:23 PM

Years ago, in the late 1990s, I worked for about two years in the Apple Computer facility in Fountain, Colorado (just south of Colorado Springs). I was a technician in the service department, repairing broken Apple desktops sent in by customers.
The engineer heading our department was a very long-time Apple employee, and one afternoon he brought in an extremely cool item for show-and-tell at one of our tech meetings: One of THE original Jobs/Wozniak hand-built Apple prototypes!!! He said it was one of two in existance – the other was in the Smithsonian.
It was a pretty crude affair – built into a wooden box, and completely hand wired. The memory consisted of lots of rows of hand wired ferrite cores.
I considered it such a privelege to be one of a handful of people allowed to actually hands-on poke around and examine such an important piece of computer history! Wish I had had a smart phone back then to take some pics…

-- Ed

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 825 days


#6 posted 02-19-2015 10:37 PM

I’ve seen pictures of the very unit you are talking about. I think that is the coolest part of computing, the start to it all. So much gets lost in the transition from inventor/initial business entrepreneur to corporate board run enterprise. At least you got to see it with your own eyes. Good for you. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View arvanlaar's profile

arvanlaar

40 posts in 663 days


#7 posted 02-20-2015 03:08 PM

Nice video Paul :) It felt like you were underwater in it haha! Like you, I am trying to get together a workshop and supplies on a shoestring budget so I really enjoy your series :) It’s hard being newlywed with a house and shop but no money haha!

I too work with computers. I am an SEO specialist as well as a front end developer with the back end guys for the life of them cannot figure out how to make things look nice :P

Keep up the good work!

-- New to working and learning as much as I can :D

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 825 days


#8 posted 02-20-2015 03:52 PM



Nice video Paul :) It felt like you were underwater in it haha!

Heh. You’re right. Well, it was either that or moving the camera as fast as my head moved around and that would make the strongest stomach turn from the motion. The optimal method would be to mount the camera on a tripod and take segments, stitching them together after editing. Someday. I enjoyed the fact that I made the ad hoc video. Before I get overly concerned about being a YT pro I need to get some actual work done.


Like you, I am trying to get together a workshop and supplies on a shoestring budget so I really enjoy your series :) It s hard being newlywed with a house and shop but no money haha!

Thank you. I’m glad my whining and often sarcastic optimism has given you something to relate to, if not avoid altogether. ;)

Being on a tight budget hits all ages and walks of life. You are at the beginning while I am closer to the back end. Our goals are the same: we want to be able to make stuff. The rest is minutiae that get in the way. :)


I too work with computers. I am an SEO specialist as well as a front end developer with the back end guys for the life of them cannot figure out how to make things look nice :P

I started working with computers in high school in 1973. Back then it was two Bell & Howell Teletypes (no monitors) and one IBM AS400. To play the game of monopoly, we had load up a fan-folded punch tape that lie within a wooden box similar to a small carpenter’s tool box. It took 20 minutes to load the program. Our greatest achievement was to setup a terminal so that when someone turned it on it would spit out some profanity or wise-crack print top the new operator. From there it all started for me in ‘87 and hasn’t stopped since. A lot of change.


Keep up the good work!

- arvanlaar

Thanks arvanlar. Appreciate the words and encouragement. I hope you get to reach your goals. Take care of the better half. Behind every great person is a… ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Roger's profile

Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#9 posted 02-20-2015 10:13 PM

hahaha Ed. Yes, I was expecting some tunes from an old Frankenstein or Dracula movie.. Still a good production.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 825 days


#10 posted 02-20-2015 10:24 PM



hahaha Ed. Yes, I was expecting some tunes from an old Frankenstein or Dracula movie.. Still a good production.

- Roger

Heh-heh. I may end up making an entrance clip to the Dungeon movies with something that would make Bela Lugosi turn over in his grave with a smile. ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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