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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #30: Veritas Mk.II Honing Guide Arrived

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Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 02-17-2015 08:56 PM 1648 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 29: Vintage 8" Folding Handle Draw Knife Acquisition Part 30 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 31: DIY Veritas Powered Sharpening System »

My ordered Veritas Mk.II Honing Guide arrived yesterday afternoon while I was out blowing snow hither and yonder.

It arrived in a slightly larger box than the one from the manufacturer. I was surprised it got here so quickly. When I looked at the originating address on the shipping invoice and box it became clear why. Lee Valley Tools Ltd has a physical presence in New York State: Ogdensburg. The shipping was free. Check. It was cheaper to buy from Lee Valley directly than through one of the large woodworking mail order firms that carried their line of goods. Check. I’m quite pleased with how fast the product shipped and how it arrived well packaged and safe. Check. And upon inspection of the honing guide, I have to say I am thoroughly impressed with its heft and construction. Check! If this guide doesn’t do something totally unexpected, I see myself buying from Lee Valley whenever they have what I need.

So here’s the manufacturer’s box:

Upon opening the box you are greeted with the instructions on use:

Here are the contents; the honing guide and angle adjustment gauge:

I haven’t weighed the honing guide. I’m guessing a couple of pounds, easily. The angle adjustment gauge is made of aluminum with brass turn knobs. I slid the gauge onto the leading edge of the guide to see how it fit. I think this is going to work nicely.

For what this does, this is a big investment for me. I think this set will make it possible for me to work effectively and safely with chisels and hand planes. The proof, of course, is in the pudding. Tomorrow I will put it to the test and report back my results.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



7 comments so far

View PaulJerome's profile

PaulJerome

57 posts in 2499 days


#1 posted 02-17-2015 09:01 PM

I have been using one for years. Great tool! I own numerous Veritas planes and tools and would recommend them to anyone considering a purchase.

-- Paul, Central Illinois

View Cantputjamontoast's profile

Cantputjamontoast

416 posts in 2899 days


#2 posted 02-18-2015 01:12 AM

it is almost impossible not to use correctly

You made a good purchase

-- "Not skilled enough to wipe jam on toast!"

View Jake's profile

Jake

850 posts in 1097 days


#3 posted 02-18-2015 08:39 AM

That is a solid purchase, I’ve used mine for about half a year now, it was a purchase well worth the price.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View LJackson's profile

LJackson

295 posts in 1060 days


#4 posted 02-18-2015 06:19 PM

Are there rollers on the bottom of the guide so that it doesn’t scrape your sharpening stone?

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#5 posted 02-18-2015 07:09 PM

Thanks for the thumbs up on this, PaulJerome, Cantputjamontoast and Jake. Appreciated.

LJackson, there is a wide brass roller on the bottom. I do have concerns on how long it will last rubbing against a diamond plate as course as 220/240 grit. I haven’t looked to see if the roller can be removed and if Veritas makes replacement. I have a heap of sharpening to do. I might find out sooner over later. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View Cantputjamontoast's profile

Cantputjamontoast

416 posts in 2899 days


#6 posted 02-19-2015 01:08 AM

I too wonder about the brass roller.

For “Coarse” grinding/honing I might use a different set up though she has held up pretty good on carborundum stones that are quite open.

-- "Not skilled enough to wipe jam on toast!"

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#7 posted 02-19-2015 01:19 AM


I too wonder about the brass roller.

For “Coarse” grinding/honing I might use a different set up though she has held up pretty good on carborundum stones that are quite open.

This was an all or none purchase. There is no other way for me to work a rough, nicked or wrong angled edge. We’ll see.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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