LumberJocks

Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #16: Elevation Control Knob and New Table Fit

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 11-02-2014 03:16 AM 1724 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 15: Down-n-Dirty Router Table Base Project Part 16 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 17: Over-Engineering and Laughing at Oneself »

Shortly after I finished the router table base it occurred to me that this could be a multi-purpose base. I knew the melamine top wasn’t deep enough to accommodate the Skilsaw 3410-02 table saw, but the newly acquired Delta 35-510 had a smaller body that fit nicely with room to spare all around. The bolts you see sticking up from the melamine are for the router table. I was glad to see that they wouldn’t interfere with the table saw.

I am a pack rat, holding onto anything that has the remotest possibility of being useful in the future. I found in my parts bin a hardwood knob that I had long ago epoxied thin cork strips to for a grip. I drilled a 3/8” hole 1/2” deep into the flat end to accommodate the shaft, then routed out a slot across the hole for the sheer pin using my old Dremel Drill Press. Because of the cork grip it is easy to turn, but it does take quite a few turns to raise and lower the blade. For now this works well and the bent shaft may not allow for a replacement OEM wheel to work, anyway.

Tomorrow I will cut out a square hole in the melamine and chipboard top for sawdust extraction. I have some plywood that will work well in making a partial box underneath that will be attached to the chipboard back. Before I do that I will cut an extraction port out of the back that I can use with my shop vac. I’ll post pictures of this final adjustment when completed.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



6 comments so far

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5734 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 11-02-2014 04:26 AM

This looks familiar, a base that will support multiple tools.
All you need to add is a standing storage cabinet to hold the tools not in use.

However, I don’t rember where I have seen this.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 827 days


#2 posted 11-02-2014 11:34 AM



This looks familiar, a base that will support multiple tools.
All you need to add is a standing storage cabinet to hold the tools not in use.

However, I don t rember where I have seen this.

- oldnovice

I spend a lot of time watching woodworking YT videos and scouring the Web for plans. Some of those ideas have been incorporated into this construction. No specific plan has been used. I built around what I started with.

As the base is now, it weights about 50 lbs. A dust extraction box underneath the top will add weight, so I think this will now need to have retractable casters along side the base’s horizontal legs to minimize having to lift it. I have some ideas on how to do this without the expense of specific hardware designed for the purpose. Standing storage units along side the base or hanging attachments, I’m sure something will some to mind once I know what space it will occupy in the dungeon.

All in all, I am quite pleased with where this table/base has ended up. The recycling and reclaiming of materials to accomplish my goals compliments the way I think.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2468 posts in 1771 days


#3 posted 11-03-2014 05:32 PM

Wow, your stand is now serving double duty. It will be interesting to see what other uses you come up with for the stand.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 827 days


#4 posted 11-03-2014 05:40 PM



Wow, your stand is now serving double duty. It will be interesting to see what other uses you come up with for the stand.

- luv2learn

I did some measuring last night to see if the new DeWalt DW734 Thickness Planer would fit. It will, dimension-wise, but I would have to remove the bolts for the router table and table saw, which I wouldn’t have to do for the other two. I think I will concentrate on these two for this base and then back to finishing up the base for the Skilsaw 3410-02 table saw.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2468 posts in 1771 days


#5 posted 11-07-2014 05:20 PM

As far as where to place the dust collection port, I vote for cutting a hole in the melamine top. Let gravity be your friend. Would replacing the bolts for your router table and table saw with threaded inserts and then running the bolts from the top help to accommodate your thickness planer?

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 827 days


#6 posted 11-07-2014 05:39 PM


As far as where to place the dust collection port, I vote for cutting a hole in the melamine top. Let gravity be your friend. Would replacing the bolts for your router table and table saw with threaded inserts and then running the bolts from the top help to accommodate your thickness planer?

- luv2learn

I’m reluctant to cut a hole in the top. The size of it would undermine some of the torsional strength and weight the base has now. It would also limit what I can use the table for, unless I consider taking the cut out piece of melamine and make it into a removable lid that can support weight.

Regarding the bolt pattern: I’m pretty sure the bolts from below will be replaced with recessed nuts in the top of melamine. This worked well for the table saw.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com