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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #10: Table Saw Base: The Saga Continues

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Blog entry by Paul Bucalo posted 10-17-2014 12:31 PM 2580 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Bench and Block Planes Purchase Part 10 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 11: Making Shavings »

Yesterday started out wet, as was the day before it, but the temperature was high enough I could be comfortable outdoors in a short sleeve shirt. I decided to move a couple of portable benches upstairs on the enclosed back porch to see if I could get more done on the table saw base. At that point, all I had together was the base framing, which comprised of four 2” x 4” pieces half-lap joined, glued and screwed together. I decided on building the framing longitudinally because I wanted strength with some flex. The reason for this is the dungeon floor is irregular and not even close to being flat in some areas. I planned on building a heavy base for its size to allow levelers to flex the base as needed. Because the shorter 1” x 6” boards used for the apron are butt joined to the longer sides, I also glued them as well as used screws. The longer sides are only screwed together.

The second picture shows the arrangement of the casters and how the levelers come into play because of the aprons. I didn’t need to use locking casters because once the saw is wheeled to where I want it, the levelers will be engaged. It wasn’t my intention to limit the swivel movement of the rotating casters, but now that I have given it some thought it’s probably for the best. The base doesn’t need to parallel park on a dime.

The next step is to build the framing for the top melamine board that the saw will be bolted to. Once done, I can measure what height I have created between the base and top constructions to determine what measurement is needed for the vertical corner framing. Target total height for the base is 34”, perfect for my small 5’ 6” frame.

With a weekend coming up, I should have the base completed by Sunday. The hold-up is not construction time. This project is being designed as I build it. Sometimes, it takes hours or days of research weighed against what I have for tools I can use and what I believe my skill level can make happen. Slow, frustrating at times, this is what I enjoy most about building things from scratch.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA



4 comments so far

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2447 posts in 1656 days


#1 posted 10-17-2014 12:51 PM

Most of my designing is done on the fly, I plan and plan but when it comes down to doing something I always hit a roadblock and have to improvise.

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 824 days


#2 posted 10-17-2014 01:04 PM



Most of my designing is done on the fly, I plan and plan but when it comes down to doing something I always hit a roadblock and have to improvise.

- Tugboater78

It’s inherent in my personality, Tugboater. I know I need to become more organized in my planning stage, but I enjoy the thrill of seeing where I can take a project on the fly. Of course, projects don’t always work out. ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2464 posts in 1767 days


#3 posted 10-17-2014 04:53 PM

”This project is being designed as I build it. Sometimes, it takes hours or days of research weighed against what I have for tools I can use and what I believe my skill level can make happen. Slow, frustrating at times, this is what I enjoy most about building things from scratch.
technoslick, you have just described the thought processes most of us go through when engaged in a project :).

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 824 days


#4 posted 10-17-2014 05:14 PM

Thanks. You know, luv2learn, it just seems like everyone I follow on social media sites pop their genius into SketchUp and automagically a great set of plans and an awesome project pops out thereafter. It’s heartening to know I am not the only one creating through trial and error off the cuff.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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