LumberJocks

what i've been doing #13: Antique shoping and a new toolbox build..

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Dave posted 11-14-2011 04:10 AM 1088 reads 0 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: Been gone a while but all is well.. Part 13 of what i've been doing series Part 14: A small wood gloat with a tool or two »

I have been wandering around again searching for old tools. I have come across a lot but most were in bad shape or the price was astronomical.
I found a nice little 1 foot ruler. For $3.00.

Now mabee you guys can answer this question. Who implemented the tenth scale on these old rulers? I own two of these. One side has 1/4 scale and the other side is in 1/10 th scale.

And I found two nice clamps for $12.00 apiece.

I have been wanting to build a small toolbox for knives, marking devices and so on. I have a bunch of small pieces of different species of wood. I have chosen to build the box out of an assortment of wood and joinery. It probably wont be pretty but it will be different.
First the frame. Sapele

The coners are lap joined with pegs. The drawer rails are dovetailed.


I chose to mill up some material for panel frames and use cedar tongue and grove for the panels. I have a bunch of the frame material but I am not sure what it is. It has a very heavy medullary grain to it when you quarter saw it. It works very easy under the chisel or plane. It is also very brittle. Would you have a guess what it is.

I had found a nice bunch of planes at one old shop. The gentleman wanted $65.00 to $180.00 for the planes. I didn’t buy any. He had a nice Liberty that I was drooling over but he wanted to much.

My plane till is well stocked with a few good users. I may start collecting some transitional planes. Those seem a bit harder to find. I think because they weren’t made as long as the wooden planes.

Thanks for reading;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com



23 comments so far

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1696 days


#1 posted 11-14-2011 04:16 AM

Nice arsenal there Dave. Good looking bunch of planes!

-- Mike

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1587 days


#2 posted 11-14-2011 04:25 AM

I can’t be sure what that frame material is. I have gotten that same unusual grain pattern though when I saw some of what we have been calling white oak. Is this from the large slabs I gave you?

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1587 days


#3 posted 11-14-2011 04:31 AM

Since I am forced to live vicariously through you and KTMM (among others) when it comes to hand tools, you know I’m a little ignorant when it comes to planes. Please exaplain what a transitional plane is.
To show just how ignorant I am in handplane lingo, I know what two kinds of planes are, wooden bodied, and metal bodied.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5444 posts in 1343 days


#4 posted 11-14-2011 04:39 AM

That is QS Sycamore in the 9th pic, good looking box.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#5 posted 11-14-2011 04:48 AM

Why tank you very much paratrooper34. Thanks for the read.

.
Yep that would be the stuff William. It looks like white oak but its not. I love it cause it is very easy to work and has the look of oak.
You had the answer right there. It was the small amount of time when they transitioned from wood to metal construction. So the body of the plane stayed wood and the upper side of the plane was all metal. They did away with the wood wedge and introduced the ability to adjust the plane with levers or knobs. Not much later he bodies became metal.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1587 days


#6 posted 11-14-2011 04:54 AM

You mean I actually stumbled across a correct assumption without even making an assumption? I was only stating how little I knew about them. I wouldn’t have actually guessed that it was indeed the transition form the older wood to the newer style metal ones.
On second though, let me back up.
Yep, that’s just what I thought you meant by transitional.
That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1587 days


#7 posted 11-14-2011 04:55 AM

So Dave, is Shane right? Is this sicamore I’ve been calling white oak all this time?
If so, every single person I have had look at it in the Vicksburg area has been wrong in their white oak guess.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1587 days


#8 posted 11-14-2011 05:00 AM

Offtopic as all get out for this thread, but SuperD, I know you will appreciate this for my wood shop.
I picked this up today.

I got it for great price.
FREE!

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#9 posted 11-14-2011 05:04 AM

Thanks ShaneA its been driving me nuts. Now I know. Thanks for the comment on the box.
He right William just google qs sycamore and click images. You will see.
Yes stumbled on the answer did you.
(؛ ɹɐǝq ǝƃɐɹǝʌɐ ǝɥʇ uɐɥʇ ɹǝʇɹɐɯs ǝɹɐ noʎ ɯɐıllıʍ sǝʎ

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5444 posts in 1343 days


#10 posted 11-14-2011 05:07 AM

No doubt the 9th pic is sycamore. Way lighter than white oak, splits easy, but works well. In my projects I have a couple made from it. One of my favorite woods.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#11 posted 11-14-2011 05:21 AM

I love the grain. I does have a bit of a tendency for tear out. But it is no where as hard as oak. Thanks Shane,that was a great help.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#12 posted 11-14-2011 05:22 AM

William what ya gona brew in that?

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1587 days


#13 posted 11-14-2011 06:26 AM

Coffeeeeeeeeeeee!
It’s a stovetop drip coffee maker. It’s three sections. You put the coffee grounds in the middle section, boil water in a seperate pot, and pour it into the top section. The water drips down through the middle section into the bottom. You keep it on top of the wood burning stove, sort of off to the side, to keep it warm.
I researched the numbers on the bottom. This model was made for years and years, but this particular one was made in 1962.
Before you ask, you know I am not an antique collector. I am an antique user. It will be used this winter on the wood stove. Now I want to find a cast iron kettle to boil the water in.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#14 posted 11-14-2011 07:05 AM

MMM cast iron kettle will be a bit hard. And if you do find one she is going to cost a bit. Wait I got it keep a micro wave near the stove and hot water will be no problem. Hold on I know a guy who had some antique water for sale. He said it was on the top shelf right next to the powdered water ;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#15 posted 11-14-2011 02:28 PM

Nice set of tools. I’ve been restoring a few transitionals as well. Quit a mixed lot you have there.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

showing 1 through 15 of 23 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase