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Workshop by stuccoman posted 11-15-2018 02:59 PM 443 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

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stuccoman

5 posts in 27 days



,
United States

I am about to start turning a barn into a workshop. a bulldozer would be best?. but I have $25,000 to spend and it has to be under a existing roof. I am going to remove all the siding . to allow access to dirt areas I will be poring a couple slabs to create one solid slab. then I need to stabilize the building mainly trusses .
my question is . before I start were can I save money.

-- BP


6 comments so far

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BernieMay

28 posts in 3237 days


#1 posted 11-15-2018 11:39 PM

Please post pictures of the inside and outside of the barn. What are its dimensions?

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stuccoman

5 posts in 27 days


#2 posted 11-16-2018 03:07 PM

I have plenty off photo’s. I have to document everything I do to get reimbursed. I will try . I don’t understand how to load these photos. dimension’s are 30 X 30
thanks for replying

-- BP

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

108 posts in 1033 days


#3 posted 11-18-2018 04:48 AM

My shop started as a roof structure for a ratty old mobile home that we had to demolish before we could build our house. The roof footprint is 70×17. The county required that I hire a building engineer to determine if the roof was stable enough for my shop. Based on his report I had to “make” my 6×6 support posts into 10×10’s by sandwiching the 6 by’s with 2×10s. After that I did all of the prep work for the concrete, (leveling, gravel, compacting, etc.) and then I did the forms for the concrete. After the concrete was poured I did all the framing, inside walls, siding, insulation, installed a 100 amp box and running all of electric by myself over the span of 18 months. I turned the building into a 2 car garage, with a 13×13 store room, and a 30×17 woodshop. Doing all of the work myself, and sweet talking the local lumber store into giving me contractor pricing the shop cost $22,500. That includes the $1500 for the engineer, and 6k for concrete, and $2800 to the folks that installed the two garage doors, (my wife wouldn’t let me do those) Here is what it looked like at the start


And how it ended

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stuccoman

5 posts in 27 days


#4 posted 11-19-2018 03:05 AM

job well done. I removed my siding . this left me with real rough cut true 2 X 4 inch studs. . I found minor termite damage in other areas . but none in the framing. some minor worm holes. is this a problem?. 2 X 4s are on 24 inch centers. this is ok for me.
there is no rot. I don’t see any damage to the existing studs. I plan to pour concrete were needed. then beef up the trusses first.. I will deal with the framing as needed. I have never ran into this type of wood. Should I remove this rough cut lumber?. if its ok i would be more than happy to just brace it as needed.

-- BP

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

108 posts in 1033 days


#5 posted 11-19-2018 04:17 AM

The “rough cut” lumber is how it was done back in the day. If it is what I think it is, the only issue is that they are true 2×4, not the 1 1/2×3 1/2 we have today. If there is no rot or live bugs it should be fine.

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Zonker

13 posts in 51 days


#6 posted 11-20-2018 01:05 PM

The most effective way to save money on a project like this is to do as much yourself as possible. For my shop I moved from a 12×18 shed to a newly built 20×24 purpose built building (sort of, I used a modified garage kit from a local lumber store). You need to understand a little about construction because the person at the store just clicks buttons on the computer to assemble the kit. I eliminated/returned a bunch of unnecessary and over bought items which took the kit price down from 10,500 to right at 9k. So, first thing is I sold the shed, this eliminated the demolition cost and actually put a few dollars towards the project. I have a brother who has been framing houses for years and I “hired” him to help. I did pay his weekly wage but he threw in many extra hours and a few extra days. Next was electrical, I consulted with an electrician and made the deal that I would rough everything in and connect the easy stuff, and he would come in and set up the panel, run the new wire from the main panel in the house and cover anything else I couldn’t handle. This saved me about 4-5 hours at $85 an hour. I drywalled the interior, (go with t-111 at least around the lower 3-4 feet) I did the work myself and was able to borrow a drywall lift. If you can’t borrow one buy one, it is a huge time saver and also was used to move the insulation to the attic and set the attic ladder. You can get one at HF for under $200 and sell it off after you’re done. Lighting: I went with LED lights on the ceiling, mine came off of Amazon and were significantly cheaper than if I’d bought locally. But for the exterior lights, I used the local Lowes and got what I needed reasonably. Paint, my shop interior is a lovely shade of light green I call “Bile #3”. It was arrived at by mixing everything I had in the garage in a 5 gallon bucket and calling it a day. Having said that, I did spring for primer and ceiling paint. HVAC: I went with a Mini Split and am lucky enough to have a friend with an HVAC license, so I got the unit at the contractor price and install was lunch and a thank you. (He wouldn’t take cash.) That’s about all I can think of right now, Good Luck with your project and show us what you come up with.

-- Larry A. - I've made a small fortune with my woodworking. The trouble is, I started with a large fortune.

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